Boyar Schultz 612 Spindle Rebuild - Page 2
Close
Login to Your Account
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 36 of 36
  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    North Carolina
    Posts
    1,839
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    125
    Likes (Received)
    324

    Default

    Very nice. I have the same Boyar Shultz belt drive grinder and I have done the spindle bearings some years ago. I do remember mine had loose balls, like bicycle head bearings. I did not have Kluber grease back then. Only Kendall blue wheel bearing grease. No trouble with the bearings yet. Guess it was a success. One other mod that I did was convert the table and the column to one shot pump oiling.
    --Doozer

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Ohio, USA
    Posts
    3
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Default

    I know this is an old thread, but...

    I just got one of these beasts myself. Spindle is noisy. RLamparter: this is one amazing writeup! Thanks a ton!

    Quick question: if I just want to try cleaning/relubing bearings, is it necessary to remove them from the spindle?

    Thanks,
    Wallace

  3. #23
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Canandaigua, NY, USA
    Posts
    2,438
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    103
    Likes (Received)
    926

    Default

    Yes, there's no other way to get at them. IMO, the old grease will be hard enough that some scrubbing, brushing or pokeing with a soft stick can be necessary.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Central PA
    Posts
    538
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    31

    Default

    Yup. Conrad's right. There's no way to get to the bearings without removing the spindle.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Canandaigua, NY, USA
    Posts
    2,438
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    103
    Likes (Received)
    926

    Default

    Don't underestimate these old girls. Mine is about as old as I am, and the bearings weren't exactly shiny when I cleaned and regreased them. Did a good cleaning of the important stuff, but didn't have time to strip and paint it. It's seriously ugly, probably painted with latex by a house painter. Added a VFD. Ground some pieces and brought them to work to check on much fancier equipment than I've got. The thing still grinds a 2.5" diameter puck to sub-micron flatness in both directions, and longer pieces seem OK too.

    I'm a bit baffled by the fact that when grinding is involved, everybody thinks the cost has to go up by 10X. If the parts are designed right, and not too much is left to clean up, grinding is the easiest job in the shop.

    One hint- they work way better if you have some way to balance the wheels.

    bs_grinder.jpg

  6. Likes stephen thomas liked this post
  7. #26
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    IL USA
    Posts
    9
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Conrad Hoffman View Post
    One hint- they work way better if you have some way to balance the wheels.
    bs_grinder.jpg
    Where do you find an accurate tapered rod to hold the wheel and arbor for balancing?

  8. #27
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Ohio, USA
    Posts
    3
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Default

    This one ended up being a "shake your head in wonder" story...

    Got spindle housing off - heard something rattling around inside. Got things apart. Someone had already replaced bearings, but hadn't tightened retaining nuts nor bent keeper tabs to hold them. Inner nut and keeper were sliding around on the spindle. Rear was hand tight. No grease on bearings. Sigh.

    Luckily, the bearings looked great! Front bearing was:
    https://www.motionindustries.com/pro...p?sku=00114155

    Rear looked like same brand, but couldn't find it. The cheapest I found that front bearing was $570!!! Someone paid >$1000 for bearings and then let the shop idiot reassemble the grinder!

    Anyway, cleaned all carefully, put 2 cc's of Chevron SRI-2 in each, and reassembled. Grinds way better than before (no surprise) but still a little noisier than I'd think it should be. But, it seems pretty solid and will be more than up to any hobby-type grinding jobs I'll ever have.

    Thanks again for the help folks!

    Regards,
    Wally

  9. #28
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Canandaigua, NY, USA
    Posts
    2,438
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    103
    Likes (Received)
    926

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by meowkat View Post
    Where do you find an accurate tapered rod to hold the wheel and arbor for balancing?
    I don't. I just stick an accelerometer on the chuck and do a 4-run single plane balance. It's pretty fast and easy- spreadsheet on my website will work out the weight and location of the final weight from the four trial runs with an arbitrary weight.

    On the bearings, SRI sounds like a good choice. Good for high speeds and should last near the life of the bearing. I have that, but used a Kluber because it was also on the shelf.

  10. #29
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    CT
    Posts
    36
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1
    Likes (Received)
    1

    Default

    excellent thread, thank you. I have a 612 that is noisy so this will help if I get to working on it. Very glad to see the pictures are still up too.

  11. #30
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    ch
    Posts
    1,987
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    185
    Likes (Received)
    255

    Default

    conrad, what exactly do you stick on there?

  12. #31
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Connecticut
    Posts
    3
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Default

    I have just joined this forum and I have a BS 612. I purchased it several years ago and have just powered it up and of course the bearings are howling..... rather than have a failure I am going to disassemble and inspect or replace the bearings, so finding your series of posts of your rebuild was just fantastic. You had mentioned that pictures were available and I am wondering if they are still available? If so would it possible to send them to my email account?

    On another note do you or anyone know of a list that might help identify the age of these bs 612's?

    THANKS FOR YOUR FANTASTIC POSTS!!!!!

  13. #32
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Central PA
    Posts
    538
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    31

    Default

    I haven't re-read the entire post, but after emailing you I noted that all of the photos for the sequence were present above. If you click on a thumbnail, it will show up as a full size picture. Are the full sized photos what you were looking for?

  14. #33
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Michigan
    Posts
    8,529
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2524
    Likes (Received)
    2874

    Default

    Great thread ..I don't have time to read it all today but will come back..few things I hope you mentioned..line up bearing marks/never blow bearings to a high spin RPM with air but hold and blow out is fine and the nose error is not that important because a light grind after rebuild will fix that.
    Oh and grease perhaps 1/4 to 1/3 filled...
    Will come back next week and read it closely..
    .00025 not bad for a used spindle nose...

    Oh and if one picks up a setting-long grinder..hand spin the spindle many times to set lose stuck grease and some may be ok to good..full speed may slide one stuck ball and ruin a bearing.

  15. #34
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Connecticut
    Posts
    3
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by RLamparter View Post
    I haven't re-read the entire post, but after emailing you I noted that all of the photos for the sequence were present above. If you click on a thumbnail, it will show up as a full size picture. Are the full sized photos what you were looking for?
    yes that is exactly what I had hoped for....however if I can use the existing photos I will do so....THANKS for the quick reply

  16. #35
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Central PA
    Posts
    538
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    31

    Default

    I thought it would be a good idea to comment that the bearings in my machine were Bardens and my serial number is around 11,500. Elsewhere on the internet I found that in some earlier machines Boyar Schultz used Fafnir MM 205 WI bearings as seen in the photos below. I *think* I read somewhere that these are the same bearings used in the spindles of Bridgeport milling machines and that they're less expensive than the Barden equivalent.
    85-fafnir-mm-250wi-front-bearing-large-.jpg 86-fafnir-mm-250wi-front-bearing-opposite-side-large-.jpg

  17. #36
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Canandaigua, NY, USA
    Posts
    2,438
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    103
    Likes (Received)
    926

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dian View Post
    conrad, what exactly do you stick on there?
    If I told you the exact p/n it wouldn't help, as I've been scarfing up surplus electronics for a long time. I think it's a Wilcoxon seismic accelerometer that probably cost a fortune. Most anything will do, but you have to filter it. I use an ancient General Radio vibration analyzer that has a notch filter. At 3600 rpm, that's 60 Hz. Without a filter you see too much noise. If I didn't have anything, I'd buy a cheap MEMS chip accelerometer and make a simple one or two opamp filter.

    FWIW, I bought one of the expensive Norton SG wheels. They're quite dense and no amount of dressing or fiddling would give me a good finish. Only when balanced was it remotely useful for anything. OTOH, I just got some thin 3/16" white wheels and they don't require anything at all other than a proper dressing.

    My machine is a bit noisy, but it doesn't show on surface finish. I think it's something to do with the front dust trap or maybe the weird EDMd coupling mine has. It doesn't use the usual rubber type.

    When the weather gets warmer I need to make a new in-out lead screw. Mine's worn to heck!


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •