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  1. #41
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    OK now I know what you are talking about. On mine the evidence of the hole is there but it has been plugged - looks like factory (its CI or steel machined flat), from the underside of the casting there is a rib around the hole. No idea as to function - idle speculation would be for the rotary grinder version which used the same base and carriage - never seen one though so just guessing that they put it there for something.

    On the stop - it definitely is designed to have a washer on the end, otherwise the over travel can drive it at least part way off the rod. I checked with he placement of the stop bolt (still have not made the handle), I'll post more pics later.

    Dimensions of the carriage ball stops (all taken with calipers). 1.375" wide by .625 tall. hole is .137dia .533 from one edge and is countersunk. I think the screw is a 6-32. I forgot to measure the thickness but 1/8 would work fine.

    On the dovetails - I actually think the later solution with dovetails on one side makes more sense. The side with dovetails is a precision scraped surface, tightening the dovetails pulls the carrier to the scraped surface. If you have dovetails on both sides your not pulling against one known surface your fighting between two (if they are scraped). I'm sure they both work fine.

    I'd be interested to see what you come up with for automating the X axis.

    Paul

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    Quote Originally Posted by PaulM View Post
    OK now I know what you are talking about. On mine the evidence of the hole is there but it has been plugged - looks like factory (its CI or steel machined flat), from the underside of the casting there is a rib around the hole. No idea as to function - idle speculation would be for the rotary grinder version which used the same base and carriage - never seen one though so just guessing that they put it there for something.
    That's going to bug the [email protected] outta me until I find out...

    Quote Originally Posted by PaulM View Post
    On the stop - it definitely is designed to have a washer on the end, otherwise the over travel can drive it at least part way off the rod. I checked with he placement of the stop bolt (still have not made the handle), I'll post more pics later.
    Mine is just a knurled nut and pinch rod, basically. Want me to remove it and take some pics?

    Quote Originally Posted by PaulM View Post
    Dimensions of the carriage ball stops (all taken with calipers). 1.375" wide by .625 tall. hole is .137dia .533 from one edge and is countersunk. I think the screw is a 6-32. I forgot to measure the thickness but 1/8 would work fine.
    Awesome. Thanks. Yes, it is 6-32. One of the broken off ones was sticking out enough for me to remove it by hand. The other is below the surface, so I'm praying for "easy"...

    Quote Originally Posted by PaulM View Post
    On the dovetails - I actually think the later solution with dovetails on one side makes more sense. The side with dovetails is a precision scraped surface, tightening the dovetails pulls the carrier to the scraped surface. If you have dovetails on both sides your not pulling against one known surface your fighting between two (if they are scraped). I'm sure they both work fine.
    You might be right. Might just be as simple as "less expensive to manufacture", too.

    Quote Originally Posted by PaulM View Post
    I'd be interested to see what you come up with for automating the X axis.
    Well, I was right at the point of finalizing a design for the B&S when the TP1 came along, and then Breze came along and posted this eloquent effort. ( links below ) In my head ( careful - it's murky in there ) I can see popping a hole through the side of the saddle ( on the left ) to allow for a belt to pass through and mounting a similar affair bracketed to the saddle itself.

    Section the shaft to allow engagement/disengagement with the rest of the shaft and spur gear that drives the table, and one would have a very nice little set-up.

    Links -

    Automated the Longitudinal Axis on my Manual Surface Grinder

    Automated Grinder Table, The Rest of the Story

  3. #43
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    I had a few broken off screws (same type - the ones that would hold stops in place). I think they get snapped off by being bashed iinto at end of travel. All the ones I ran into that were flush or below responded realy well to center punching and thenleft hand drill, spun each one out. Hope you have similar luck.

    OK more pics - scraped inside of column where dovetails and spindle mount block goes.


    Dovetails


    Inside of tilt mechanism - just a worm gear and chain that will allow you to control the movement easier. No reason not to make something that does the same function if you wind up with one without this feature.


    Spindle in place - looks like a grinder.


    Still meed to paint motor housing. I hate painted over hardware but I have little experience wilt pulling apart motors and even less with grinder spindles. I assume pulling the back or the cover off will not cause any problems (the SHCS in the pic)? I need to change the cord as well as it has seen better days.


    Picture of the locking bolt (that I need to make the handle for). A neat feature is that it is center drilled to allow oiling the rod it runs on - the parts list shows the handle and an oil screw.


    lat picture for now - stop rod with lock in place. Screw and washer should go in the end.

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    Paul, that "handle" is just a knurled knob. Here's some pics. Also, do yourself a favor and look at the back of the motor. I don't know if it is even possible on yours, but it's something you definitely want to investigate. It's one of those many little things that make me love this grinder from the get-go. ( all the little user friendly doo dads ) There's a spindle lock on the back of mine that makes swapping out wheel hubs REAAAAAAAAAALLY ridiculously easy and QUICK. After a lifetime of grinding, little things like that make my life a little more enjoyable...
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails img_0998a.jpg   img_0999a.jpg   img_1001a.jpg   img_1002a.jpg  

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    Take a close look at the knurled knob - in the center there may be a screw or similar to allow you to oil through the center of the bolt. otherwise you would just remove it. I'll either go with a knurled knob or maybe 6 lobed as that would be easy with a hex collet holder.

    The spindle lock looks neat. If you take it off I'd appreciate pictures. You can see mine just has a flat plate there. The hole in the center you can feel the spindle turn. That plate is painted in place really well, removed the 4 screws and scraped the paint but its still stuck at the moment. I was thinking of going to the next level, the small socket screws and the split just forward of those. I would assume that should not cause any issue with the motor spindle?

    Paul

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    Quote Originally Posted by Zahnrad Kopf View Post
    I think I am going to keep this one for a while. It's really a very nice, compact, well built grinder!
    Between the two of you - and I've been in Paul's shop and seen firsthand the quality of work he does - you've convinced me of that.

    I've added the Taft-Pierce to my Parker-Majestic SG 'wishlist'. If/as/when .... and AFTER I get the REST of the Old Iron out of its various wheelchairs and cribs and put back to work, anyway.

    Bill

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    Careful... ... ... might be brush holders back there... Don't let anything go SPROING!

    I'll do that for you. Gimme a day or two and I'll take it apart and make some measurements or models and prints for you.

    Yes, the knob has an oil port or sort. Actually works very well. Takes very little pressure to lock the table traverse. ( another of the doo dads I referred to ) Yet another is that micro cross feed. I'm really shocked that I haven't ever come across these before and that they're not as popular as breathing. Very friendly machines.

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    Quote Originally Posted by thermite View Post
    Between the two of you - and I've been in Paul's shop and seen firsthand the quality of work he does - you've convinced me of that.
    I've added the Taft-Pierce to my Parker-Majestic SG 'wishlist'. If/as/when .... and AFTER I get the REST of the Old Iron out of its various wheelchairs and cribs and put back to work, anyway.
    Bill
    I know I'm bordering on gushing, here... but it really does strike my fancy. Take that as coming from someone that's kinda hated grinding most of my life and only really started liking it more in the last 6 or 7 years, mostly of necessity for the types of parts we make. Grinders are just not usually FRIENDLY machines, all the way around the horn. This one has piqued my interest, though. Small foot print, plenty of mass, and lots of "user"-centric features. Haven't put a chuck on this one yet, but I can't measure anything with my millionths indicator on the table. It just baaaaaaarely "hovers" a bit.

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    Quote Originally Posted by PaulM View Post
    I assume pulling the back or the cover off will not cause any problems (the SHCS in the pic)?
    Flat-cover at centre alone should be fine, and all you need to get at least a partial eyeball on that bearing and change-out the cord.
    Entire end-bell pull is NOT entirely a safe assumption. Many motors carry their bearings in the end-bell. T-P or P-M et al with direct-drive motors are in a carefully balanced embrace with their spindles, and the less risk of disturbing any part of it, the better.


    Bill

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    Popped the flat cover, as suspected it was well glued by paint both at the OD and at the center hole. Wiring in a new cord will be easy now.
    Quick inspection of the end of the spindle looks like there is an internal hex so it could be held with a allen wrench, seems like an obvious thing to do but from your comments may in fact be rare (at least on other grinders).
    A spindle lock should be relatively easy to fit up, I'm dreaming up options, it will be interesting to see what is in yours when you get around to it.

    Paul

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    Quote Originally Posted by PaulM View Post
    Popped the flat cover, as suspected it was well glued by paint both at the OD and at the center hole. Wiring in a new cord will be easy now. Quick inspection of the end of the spindle looks like there is an internal hex so it could be held with a allen wrench, seems like an obvious thing to do but from your comments may in fact be rare (at least on other grinders). A spindle lock should be relatively easy to fit up, I'm dreaming up options, it will be interesting to see what is in yours when you get around to it. Paul

    Hey buddy, I actually started to do it for you last night, but Herself came to tell me that the furnace had stopped working so I got elbows deep in that for a few hours last night... I'll make sure to get you good pics at the least, tonight. If you want models and/or prints it'll be a few days after.

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    Here ya go buddy... About as simple as it can possibly get... Should take all of two hours to whip it up and install it.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails img_1003a.jpg   img_1004a.jpg   img_1005a.jpg   img_1006a.jpg   img_1007a.jpg  


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    More because they won't all fit.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails img_1009a.jpg   img_1010a.jpg   img_1011a.jpg   img_1012a.jpg   img_1013a.jpg  


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    Also, I've now had the table off as well as all the guards and handwheels. I've found the number "5" stamped on each major piece. Other than that, I cannot find any other numbers on this old girl. I can't possibly have the fifth one made... Can I? Anyone intimate with these things know where else I might find a serial number to date the thing?

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    Yes looks like it should be easy to make one.
    Using a woodruf key as shown (or pins or keystock...) and slotting the internal mating part would give me an excuse to make up a internal slotting tool for the little shaper I got a while ago.
    Can't help any more on serial number (obviously not in the same locations as on mine), maybe someone with an old one has more info.
    Paul

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    May be... and as much as I love my own shaper, this is a 10 minute keyway broaching job. Quick'n'dirty. And THAT coming from the most easily distracted... Ooh! Shiny! Errr... what are we talking about... ?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Zahnrad Kopf View Post
    .. Ooh! Shiny! Errr... what are we talking about... ?
    Numbah FIVE!

    No real reason you couldn't have the fifth one ever made.. of that model, anyway.

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    may be a 10 min broaching job but I don't have any of those, so many ways to skin that cat.

    Paul

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    Quote Originally Posted by PaulM View Post
    may be a 10 min broaching job but I don't have any of those, so many ways to skin that cat. Paul
    So how about this - You've certainly helped me enough. If you get busy with other stuff, send it to me and I'll do it for you.

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    Quote Originally Posted by PaulM View Post
    I'd be interested to see what you come up with for automating the X axis. Paul
    So I took a quick peek in there tonight... My original thought of cutting a hole in the side of the carriage is not going to work because the left hand side's roller way is RIGHT there. And, while there is a little room up under the carriage, it's not a lot. So I'm starting to think along the lines of a stepper motor mounted parallel to the driving shaft. The problem with that is how to drive it. A driver is easy, but can one tell a stepper motor to drive and reverse with switches? I imagine that one would need some sort of pulse generator to drive it. So... that's stepper motor, driver, pulse generator, switches and power supply...

    I'm also thinking that I'm going to do away with the very cool green lens ( and light behind it ) that harkens wonderfully to that era that it came from, but in practice seems fairly useless... Plus I think I would like better guarding at that end of the table to boot. Probably bend up a winged attachment for that end to catch grit ( and eventually coolant and grit ).

    Other than that, I need to make a bracket to mount the e-mag's controller and make some magnet hold downs, as the ones that went with this magnet seem to have taken a Zen attitude and found their own path, away from the magnet.

    Was a bit very pleasantly surprised when I fired it up for the first time and could barely even tell it was running. Had to stare at the wheel to make sure! AMAZINGLY quiet motor and spindle.

    Oh, and Paul... when you're ready to pull the wheel hub and find out it is a Taft Pierce hub, feel free to call and I'll tell you what thread to cut when you make a new puller! I'll give you a hint - it's NOT the ONLY other two I've ever found...


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