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    Default 3D printing a pizza

    First the space program gave us Tang, and now they're adding solid food.

    Reportedly this printer can make a pizza aboard the International Space Station. Looking forward to the restaurant reviews.

    NASA Funds Technology to Enable Astronauts to Print 3D Pizzas in Space : News : Nature World News

    and

    This Robot Could 3D Print Pizzas in Space for Astronauts | Inverse

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    Big damned deal.

    Give me a ride up there and I'll make a pizza without needing a ridiculously expensive printer to do it!

    But I'll probably have to leave out the trick where I throw the crust into the air and spin it.

    Steve

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    Well now there goes your 16 YO chances at getting an
    entry level minimum wage job....right out the window.
    (pizza thrower)

    Why not automate the CEO's ? The cost reduction would be much greater.....

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    Quote Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
    Why not automate the CEO's? The cost reduction would be much greater...
    I've already been automated. However, my operating system is often stuck in a loop: "Yes, dear...yes, dear...yes, dear..."

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    Quote Originally Posted by SteveF View Post
    Big damned deal.

    Give me a ride up there and I'll make a pizza without needing a ridiculously expensive printer to do it!

    But I'll probably have to leave out the trick where I throw the crust into the air and spin it.

    Steve
    Flexibility of food is a big psychological factor in long-duration space excursions. It's not the novelty of "OMG IT MADE A PIZZA" - it's the novelty of a machine taking base ingredients and being able to make a complex (relatively) food product. All with crude heavy-handed preservation techniques, little-to-no-moisture for microbial growth inhibition, and very-long-term storage with minimal waste, minimal mass, and not prone to causing a big mess in micro-gravity.

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    Didn't seem to be too much of a psychological burden for those of us who served in the Army with a very small number of choices in the C-ration or MRE cases. Soyuz/Mir mission crew seem to have survived nicely without 3D pizza printers. Honestly, only NASA is run with the same mentality as the CEO of Gillette who once famously said "My job is to make every shave as expensive as possible".

    Steve

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    Wasn't there a NASA study a few years back on what kind of foods they would have on a mars mission?

    I seem to remember Rand Paul criticizing it. Go to Hawaii and get paid $5000 to think about what kind of food you would want to eat. Answer was pizza.

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    First report I ever saw about using 3D printing to make food. Cleaning the nozzles seems like interesting technology.

    Didn't know it would push somebody's sourpuss buttons. You guys pissed off because it's part of a globalist conspiracy to deny the earth is flat, or what? Lighten up ffs, sheesh

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    Quote Originally Posted by SteveF View Post
    Didn't seem to be too much of a psychological burden for those of us who served in the Army with a very small number of choices in the C-ration or MRE cases. Soyuz/Mir mission crew seem to have survived nicely without 3D pizza printers. Honestly, only NASA is run with the same mentality as the CEO of Gillette who once famously said "My job is to make every shave as expensive as possible".

    Steve
    Aww, boo hoo, you didn't like your food, so nobody else can have good food either.

    Crybaby.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sea Farmer View Post
    First the space program gave us Tang, and now they're adding solid food.

    Reportedly this printer can make a pizza aboard the International Space Station. Looking forward to the restaurant reviews.

    NASA Funds Technology to Enable Astronauts to Print 3D Pizzas in Space : News : Nature World News

    and

    This Robot Could 3D Print Pizzas in Space for Astronauts | Inverse
    Skip the 3D printer. Let's just go straight for the Star Trek replicator. Couldn't cost much more than 5-10 trillion dollars to make.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sea Farmer View Post
    Aww, boo hoo, you didn't like your food, so nobody else can have good food either.

    Crybaby.
    Yeah but, Bruh... A machine that prints a pizza??? Are you kidding me? Cause its so hard to pat out some dough and put tomato sauce, cheese and pepperoni on it. Good grief...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Addison View Post
    Yeah but, Bruh... A machine that prints a pizza??? Are you kidding me? Cause its so hard to pat out some dough and put tomato sauce, cheese and pepperoni on it. Good grief...
    When you think about this, the equivalent of making a pizza in outer space would be making one on earth in a swimming pool. Those ingredients, with a lack of gravity, will simply start to diffuse though the living environment and before you know it the astronauts (or fish in the pool) will be breathing flour, pizza sauce and maybe a few pepperoni.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sea Farmer View Post
    First the space program gave us Tang, and now they're adding solid food.

    Reportedly this printer can make a pizza aboard the International Space Station. Looking forward to the restaurant reviews.

    NASA Funds Technology to Enable Astronauts to Print 3D Pizzas in Space : News : Nature World News

    and

    This Robot Could 3D Print Pizzas in Space for Astronauts | Inverse
    Seriously? The agency that NO LONGER HAS A SPACE SHUTTLE (or even any rockets!) is going to waste taxpayer money on this nonsense? Even a non "space scientist" should be able to figure it would be more cost (and weight) effective to prepackage "modular" pizzas where cheese, dough, and various topping combos were freeze dried as thin layers that get assembled in a stack that suits the users fancy before being re-hydrated and heated. If the "oven" were built like a fume hood any loose crumbs could be captured before they got loose into crew spaces.

    There NASA, I just simplified your space pizza program for you and I didn't even get paid for this one.

    I'll even suggest an acronym, Pizza Orbital Overlay Nondisruptive or POON.

    Then NASA can be famous for another food item, POON, to go along with the well known TANG.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Addison View Post
    Yeah but, Bruh... A machine that prints a pizza??? Are you kidding me? Cause its so hard to pat out some dough and put tomato sauce, cheese and pepperoni on it. Good grief...
    You ever watch them make food in microgravity?

    It's not about being difficult. It's about not having a dedicated cafeteria in some mission areas, and reducing risk of F.O.D. in critical mission areas. It's easier to control debris than it is to launch excessive mass by putting people-perfect panel enclosures on everything.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Scottl View Post
    Seriously? The agency that NO LONGER HAS A SPACE SHUTTLE (or even any rockets!) is going to waste taxpayer money on this nonsense? Even a non "space scientist" should be able to figure it would be more cost (and weight) effective to prepackage "modular" pizzas where cheese, dough, and various topping combos were freeze dried as thin layers that get assembled in a stack that suits the users fancy before being re-hydrated and heated. If the "oven" were built like a fume hood any loose crumbs could be captured before they got loose into crew spaces.

    There NASA, I just simplified your space pizza program for you and I didn't even get paid for this one.

    I'll even suggest an acronym, Pizza Orbital Overlay Nondisruptive or POON.

    Then NASA can be famous for another food item, POON to go along with the well known TANG.
    So should we wait until there is a man-capable spacecraft sitting on a launch pad before we invest in plans of supplies? You make no sense. You've apparently never had to handle procurement, scheduling, and project management for complicated projects.

    I don't see why not having a space shuttle (which isn't really true) matters. Both Dragon and Starliner are nearly ready to go, and Trump+Congress are pledging support for exoplanetary missions, aimed toward long duration mission planning.

    As for a waste of money... NASA is a net-profitable venture for FedGov, netting $3-8 per $1 invested, last I read. They must be doing SOMETHING right.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Flail View Post
    When you think about this, the equivalent of making a pizza in outer space would be making one on earth in a swimming pool. Those ingredients, with a lack of gravity, will simply start to diffuse though the living environment and before you know it the astronauts (or fish in the pool) will be breathing flour, pizza sauce and maybe a few pepperoni.
    Very true, but does the 3d printer itself not have the exact same issue? Remember the printer is in the "pool" itself... As far as I can see the printer uses pre-made dough, packaged tomato sauce and silly string for cheese and simply deposits is in the shape of a pizza. If everything is already made, who needs a cnc pizza maker to assemble it?

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    A few years ago, my son was an intern at Nathan Myrvold's company- Intellectual Ventures.
    They were developing prototypes of food printers there.
    The whole place is kind of like Tom Swift's lab, with a bunch of Phd's dreaming up stuff, and a fully staffed shop for almost anything making the prototypes.
    They were also working on a laser beam that injured, but didnt kill, female mosquitos, to keep them from laying eggs. It didnt shoot at males, and it was more or less working the last I heard.

    Intellectual Ventures Lab | Intellectual Ventures Laboratory

    this guy, Pablo Holman is a leader in food printing tech.
    We will eventually be able to print food: Inventor Pablos Holman - Livemint

    You do realize that you have been able to get edible cartridges for printers for some years now?
    Its established tech for cake decorating.
    Edible Inks and Cake Printers

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    Quote Originally Posted by JNieman View Post
    As for a waste of money... NASA is a net-profitable venture for FedGov, netting $3-8 per $1 invested, last I read. They must be doing SOMETHING right.
    Don't know what your source is for that, but it sounds highly, highly unlikely. NASA's budget comes 100% from the American taxpayer. Now I can well believe that the FedGov might consider tax revenue to be "profit" but in objective terms it is not.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Oldwrench View Post
    Don't know what your source is for that, but it sounds highly, highly unlikely. NASA's budget comes 100% from the American taxpayer. Now I can well believe that the FedGov might consider tax revenue to be "profit" but in objective terms it is not.
    It's not revenue-positive when you simply add receipts/expenses. It's a profitable value from the standpoint of private industry, including manufacturing. Taxpayers put in something like $18bil, depending on year, and with that taxpayer investment, we see far greater economic value, in the order of 10-14x (I tend to lean on the more conservative numbers like the 3-8x I mentioned, because... it's still a Federal agency. They aren't there for profit - they're there for service to us)

    The value gained is through the technology invented. The entire solar power industry owes a significant portion of their efficiency to NASA fund developments. Defibrilators, GPS, etc. Studies crop up continually to describe the economic impact. One example, Measuring the economic returns from successful NASA life sciences technology transfers. - PubMed - NCBI shows specific impacts on life science R&D only. It defines and measures the economic impact and return on investment, showing great economic gains.

    It's what the taxpayers get back - not what NASA profits, that I mean. What do 'we' get out of it? I think we get a vastness that is immeasurable and important, less tangential, and surely less 'bankable' - but the numbers indicate that the American taxpayers sees economic improvement far and above what we taxpayers put into NASA.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JNieman View Post
    It's not revenue-positive when you simply add receipts/expenses. It's a profitable value from the standpoint of private industry, including manufacturing. Taxpayers put in something like $18bil, depending on year, and with that taxpayer investment, we see far greater economic value, in the order of 10-14x (I tend to lean on the more conservative numbers like the 3-8x I mentioned, because... it's still a Federal agency. They aren't there for profit - they're there for service to us)

    The value gained is through the technology invented. The entire solar power industry owes a significant portion of their efficiency to NASA fund developments. Defibrilators, GPS, etc. Studies crop up continually to describe the economic impact. One example, Measuring the economic returns from successful NASA life sciences technology transfers. - PubMed - NCBI shows specific impacts on life science R&D only. It defines and measures the economic impact and return on investment, showing great economic gains.

    It's what the taxpayers get back - not what NASA profits, that I mean. What do 'we' get out of it? I think we get a vastness that is immeasurable and important, less tangential, and surely less 'bankable' - but the numbers indicate that the American taxpayers sees economic improvement far and above what we taxpayers put into NASA.

    Sent Using Tapatalk - Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma, Tahlequah OK


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