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    Quote Originally Posted by jsmith3322 View Post
    The 3d printer doesnt create with the SAME precision as cnc, it has MUCH BETTER precision of 5 microns. You saying that cnc has 0.0005" is bs. cnc tolerance is .002 inches at the very most. That's 50 micron and that's with very specialized machines. Read this so you actually get some education: http://www2.mae.ufl.edu/designlab/La...Tolerances.pdf
    You have no idea what you are talking about. None.

    Quote Originally Posted by jsmith3322 View Post
    I just destroyed you logically.
    *tips fedora* m'dumbass.

    Seriously you sound like some fedora wearing neckbeard fuck from reddit when you say shit like that. It certainly doesn't help your credibility.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jsmith3322 View Post
    The 3d printer doesnt create with the SAME precision as cnc, it has MUCH BETTER precision of 5 microns. You saying that cnc has 0.0005" is bs. cnc tolerance is .002 inches at the very most. That's 50 micron and that's with very specialized machines. Read this so you actually get some education: http://www2.mae.ufl.edu/designlab/La...Tolerances.pdf
    I took manufacturing methods in school too. That paper you posted as gospel is just a general guideline for students that have never made anything.

    I have been involved with a few 3d printed metal objects. They all required finish machining to hold an acceptable profile tolerance and surface finish. These components also cost several multiples of what a regular machined part would.

    Machining and casting are not going away any time soon.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rob_b View Post
    ....
    5-6 hours if i remember correctly. The main benefit of a nylon soft jaw is that you really have no chance of scratching an otherwise finished part.
    Ouch... so maybe one hour to draw and actually machine it conventionally.
    But if you can just walk away and it is not consider a machine in you overhead rate, does not eat much maintenance, consumables, floor space, electricity......
    $10/hr machine against a $60 .......
    Bob

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    I took manufacturing methods in school too. That paper you posted as gospel is just a general guideline for students that have never made anything.

    I have been involved with a few 3d printed metal objects. They all required finish machining to hold an acceptable profile tolerance and surface finish. These components also cost several multiples of what a regular machined part would.

    Machining and casting are not going away any time soon.

    Oh im sorry I didn't realize that you're smarter than a university. Let me guess, you didn't go to college because you were just too smart for it. Or you just didn't "try" but you're actually a closet genius. Hell lets just scrap the university system since we've got you around. Who needs them.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JNieman View Post
    You have no idea what you are talking about. None.



    *tips fedora* m'dumbass.

    Seriously you sound like some fedora wearing neckbeard fuck from reddit when you say shit like that. It certainly doesn't help your credibility.
    You're a classic bitter desperate machinist that replies with insults, but no facts or evidence. I bet you don't even know what a micron is.

    What are you going to do when all that machinery you paid so much for to those companies is obsolete in a few years? I bet you took financing on it. You're going to go on the forum to bitch and insult others, all the while providing no evidence or making any logical arguments.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jsmith3322 View Post
    You're a classic bitter desperate machinist that replies with insults, but no facts or evidence. I bet you don't even know what a micron is.

    What are you going to do when all that machinery you paid those companies for is obsolete in a few years? You're going to go on the forum to bitch and insult others, all the while providing no evidence or making any logical arguments.


    Wait a second...This coming from the guy that didn't know if a cheap ass contraption could cut steel and came here asking for help? On a budget of $3k? Trying to make a robot? Ha! such entertainment hearing you squeak about how the world is in upheaval and machinists are doomed. Get out of your parents basement.

    Oh, and comments about what a univeristy publishes and what works in the real world? I've run a research lab at a university and am now engineering at the largest US facility in its industry. Both jobs were in the same field (wood products). I can tell you from first hand experience that those axioms that the academic world are so fond of printing can quickly fall apart in practice.

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    Quote Originally Posted by inwoodcutter View Post
    Wait a second...This coming from the guy that didn't know if a cheap ass contraption could cut steel and came here asking for help? On a budget of $3k? Trying to make a robot? Ha! such entertainment hearing you squeak about how the world is in upheaval and machinists are doomed. Get out of your parents basement.

    Oh, and comments about what a univeristy publishes and what works in the real world? I've run a research lab at a university and am now engineering at the largest US facility in its industry. Both jobs were in the same field (wood products). I can tell you from first hand experience that those axioms that the academic world are so fond of printing can quickly fall apart in practice.
    Classic desperate machinist is so desperate that he went over my whole post history trying to see if he could find some kind of argument to make. I won't read you post history, I don't care about it at all.

    Obviously I don't want to spend more than $3000 on a technology I know is obsolete.
    Obviously I don't want to spend $500,000 on the several cnc machines that are necessary to
    make a metal product. Then I don't want to spend $40,000 a year on each machinists, several of which work in each machine. Then I don't want to spend $10,000 a month on the floorspace for all of those machines. And I dont want to spend tens of thousands on the tooling. Not to mention tens of thousands on software, and computers. Not when I can buy a 3d printer to make me any part for $30,000, which i can carry myself, and put it in my house and plug it in, no matter how much you people bitch here about how your jobs are actually secure because you say so, right guys? right?

    I work at a car suspension parts factory. I could buy the 3d printer for 30,000 and have more capability than that entire facility that cost them tens of millions and hundreds of thousands to run each month.

    You're a carpenter. I cut wood with a hand saw and shape it with sandpaper.

    Well see how many people buy your wood products when a 3d printer can print it in carbon fiber.

    How about making arguments with evidence and some logic, instead of bitching about how your profession isn't obsolete because you said so.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jsmith3322 View Post
    Oh im sorry I didn't realize that you're smarter than a university. Let me guess, you didn't go to college because you were just too smart for it. Or you just didn't "try" but you're actually a closet genius. Hell lets just scrap the university system since we've got you around. Who needs them.
    Lets go with closet genius, I like that title more than mechanical engineer.

    Manufacturing is not the focus of universities. Mechanical engineers need some background in it to function, so they take a 3 hour course - part of which is your link. It is geared toward students who have never set foot in a garage or shop before (the majority) and the information was 10-20 years out of date when I was in college.

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    You know the forum has an ignore feature, right?

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    Quote Originally Posted by jsmith3322 View Post
    Classic desperate machinist is so desperate that he went over my whole post history trying to see if he could find some kind of argument to make. I won't read you post history, I don't care about it at all.

    Obviously I don't want to spend more than $3000 on a technology I know is obsolete.
    Obviously I don't want to spend $500,000 on the several cnc machines that are necessary to
    make a metal product. Then I don't want to spend $40,000 a year on each machinists, several of which work in each machine. Then I don't want to spend $10,000 a month on the floorspace for all of those machines. And I dont want to spend tens of thousands on the tooling. Not to mention tens of thousands on software, and computers. Not when I can buy a 3d printer to make me any part for $30,000, which i can carry myself, and put it in my house and plug it in, no matter how much you people bitch here about how your jobs are actually secure because you say so, right guys? right?

    I work at a car suspension parts factory. I could buy the 3d printer for 30,000 and have more capability than that entire facility that cost them tens of millions and hundreds of thousands to run each month.

    You're a carpenter. I cut wood with a hand saw and shape it with sandpaper.

    Well see how many people buy your wood products when a 3d printer can print it in carbon fiber.

    How about making arguments with evidence and some logic, instead of bitching about how your profession isn't obsolete because you said so.
    OK, I'll humor you only for the entertainment of yet another crazy hippie bullshit response from you.

    It took 30 seconds to look over the dozen or so posts you have here and realize you are a lunatic.

    If the economics of 3D printing are so great then why are we all not flocking to the technology? You can make any part on a 3D printer that cost you $30,000? How many of those parts could damn near every member here crank out on a $1500 Bridgeport in 1/10th the time and better accuracy, and in a steel that has superior mechanical porperties?

    So buy your $30,000 printer and run the suspension mfr. out of business if it is so easy. Have you ever actually made anything from start to finish? That a person or business found useful and paid for it? What do you do at the suspension factory? Push a button? Oh, I'm sorry, I bet you sweep the floors.

    Am I a carpenter or a desparate machinist? So you cut wood with a hand saw and sand paper? You are such a Luddite! Toss out those ancient techniques and print your carbon fiber. In the mean time I'll keep making cabinets with CNC saws and routers and other high rate equipment (our door shaper runs 1000 doors an hour). Will 3D printers displace wood? Only when they can recreate wood grain. Our customers want the look and feel of real wood. Nothing printed (even 2d vinyl wraps) has been able to replace that yet.

    How long has the steel stud been around? 20, 30 years? It has yet to completely displace the good old wood tubafur. Last time I was at the big box home improvement store there was still plenty of lumber. They have extruded deck material that is a wood-plastic composite. Has that replaced all wood decks? Nope.

    I'll keep using as much evidence and logic as you have, just to play fair.

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    I didn't need to look at his post history - I remembered seeing the dumbass tube cutting thread and immediately knowing he's out of place, here.

    For the fuck of it...

    1- the graph posted re: manufacturing tolerances is for the median expectable, with a side of caution, not the extent of capability. The graph was also drawn up in the early 20th century and never changed. It's just copied over and over, seemingly with fewer pixels each damned time, and reprinted ad infinitum.

    2- I'm not a machinist - I'm a designer (and sometimes programmer) who has been a machinist and programmer, and still can, working in manufacturing. I also personally own, and have put my own money into, additive manufacturing machinery. I also regularly sub out professional work when a process is required I don't have the capability of. I guarantee I know more than you do on this topic, judging by your posts, and am much better posed to take advantage of this technology at the point of full maturity. You're obviously just a fanboy with the most superficial experience.

    3- you'd do well to step off your high horse. This forum is not completely full of a bunch of over wearing ignorant rednecks that barely finished high school. There's a lot of engineers and highly formally educated people on here (seeing as it IS a professionally-aimed forum, and not for those cutting brass tube for toy projects while sitting in their living room) and people who've been formally trained on industry-specific topics over decades of experience, as well as actual leading subject-matter-experts in various disciplines and trades. You'd do well to relocate your humility.

    4- Many here (not me) are business owners. The primary goal of business owners is to make money. Those here are among those more educated on modern technology as they obviously are comfortable using the internet to stay abreast of what's happening in the world. If additive manufacturing is set to be profitable, I guarantee it'll start popping up more frequently in shops across the world. As it is, it's a niche process, which is why the best course right now, is for a shop to set up with an automated team of 3d printing machines networked and automated to the lowest possible overhead, to be contracted as-needed by manufacturers. Most cutting edge manufacturing processes start this way... they pop up in niche businesses until the technology is affordable enough, or the ROI is near enough, that you can start buying ones and twos for individual businesses spread around.

    5- You're constantly applying so many assumptions to people with no reason - you have a serious chip on your shoulder and are projecting.. either serious issues, or you're just making shit up to continue trolling - I guarantee no one gives a shit other than that you should lay off. Sorry if me alluding you're a dumbass is what fired you off. Though to be fair, you're not doing much to change my opinion there.

    6- You're assuming that capabilities automatically mean the status quo is obsolete. Until the /economics/ also exceed the status quo, it isn't better, yet. Yes, it's an uphill battle. On equal ground, the new thing might take the lead easily. But it isn't on equal ground. It's competing with an enemy that has a head start. It has the benefit of the economics of scale. The benefit of established logistics. The benefit of consumer normalcy. The benefit of widespread competitive pricing due to mass adoption. It takes more than 'capability' to become 'better'. Just because your theoretical $30k printer can make a part with much less raw material waste, fewer quantity of processes, and maybe even to a higher degree of precision, that doesn't mean you're more capable. Your factory probably spits out tons of parts-per-hour. Your machine would run at hours-per-part. What about springs? I may be wrong (wouldn't be surprised) but I haven't read anything in the heat treatment developments of laser sintered steels to suggest that a spring is capable of withstanding millions of cycles like your automotive suspensions would require. Can you 3d print a functional coil spring with existing heat treatment processes? Is anyone even close to that? Even a leaf spring? Yes, pneumatic or hydraulic dampeners are great, but are not, yet, standalone, and you couldn't make a good-enough bore that many times deeper than diameter, so those are out of consideration, currently, anyhow.

    7- Aside from the economics... 3d printing is FAR off from being able to replace many processes. Flatness, parallelism, perpendicularity, surface roughness, cylindricity of precision bores... these are the Achilles' heel of DMLS/SLS and other additive processes, and of the utmost importance to machine building. At the least, when additive processes become common, we'll still need traditional processes to refine the results (just like castings). The precision required to sinter or electron beam weld material together to get the necessary function of a bearing bore, or a sliding fit for a guide shaft, or ball screw carriage... it would be incredibly impractical with even the most cutting edge theoretical processes, maybe impossible still. Your best hope is the marriage of additive to traditional. Not replacement. You need some perspective.

    8- Are you familiar with typical manufacturing requirements for machine building? We make a lot of components and framework for robotic machinery, precision grinding and honing machines, and lots of tool&die work. Between our best mill machinists/toolmakers and wire edm processes, hitting tolerances over several inches within .0001s is routine. Perpendicularity within a few thou over 20+ inches is an occasional requirement. Think about what you think the most precise traditional machining process is... now understand that someone had to make those components even more precisely in order for that machine to perform as it does. Even with some in-situ adjustments, tramming, and alignments, you have to have something very true to begin with.

    Read more, post less - you'll benefit greatly.

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    Jnieman, what you wrote is probably going over his head anyways, but it's nice to read an intelligent response to a troll.
    Myself, I could not do it, as I immediately wanted to start calling him less than pleasant names.

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    Last 2 posters had it right.

    3D printing may have some uses, likely will (does).

    But, a cast part in plastic, or metal, is very accurate, strong, and cheap in medium qty and up.
    But, a machined part is relatively fast to get, is very good, very accurate, and quite cheap, relatively.

    Lets say a new, my-invention-here, 3d printer, at nanoscale and lightspeed, can make metal bits almost as fast as a cnc lathe/mill.

    The powder/material will be much more expensive than a std billet in whatever metal, be it steel, alu or unobtainium.

    And the laws of fysics say that the sintered/printed piece is porous and less strong.
    It may well be, at some point, Good Enough.
    And some simple finishing like wicking paints/lacquer/ovens/laser may make the surfaces look or feel "solid".

    But all the above wont be easy as in the machine+materials will be expensive, and wont be cheap.
    And slow.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JNieman View Post
    I didn't need to look at his post history - I remembered seeing the dumbass tube cutting thread and immediately knowing he's out of place, here.

    For the fuck of it...

    1- the graph posted re: manufacturing tolerances is for the median expectable, with a side of caution, not the extent of capability. The graph was also drawn up in the early 20th century and never changed. It's just copied over and over, seemingly with fewer pixels each damned time, and reprinted ad infinitum.

    2- I'm not a machinist - I'm a designer (and sometimes programmer) who has been a machinist and programmer, and still can, working in manufacturing. I also personally own, and have put my own money into, additive manufacturing machinery. I also regularly sub out professional work when a process is required I don't have the capability of. I guarantee I know more than you do on this topic, judging by your posts, and am much better posed to take advantage of this technology at the point of full maturity. You're obviously just a fanboy with the most superficial experience.

    3- you'd do well to step off your high horse. This forum is not completely full of a bunch of over wearing ignorant rednecks that barely finished high school. There's a lot of engineers and highly formally educated people on here (seeing as it IS a professionally-aimed forum, and not for those cutting brass tube for toy projects while sitting in their living room) and people who've been formally trained on industry-specific topics over decades of experience, as well as actual leading subject-matter-experts in various disciplines and trades. You'd do well to relocate your humility.

    4- Many here (not me) are business owners. The primary goal of business owners is to make money. Those here are among those more educated on modern technology as they obviously are comfortable using the internet to stay abreast of what's happening in the world. If additive manufacturing is set to be profitable, I guarantee it'll start popping up more frequently in shops across the world. As it is, it's a niche process, which is why the best course right now, is for a shop to set up with an automated team of 3d printing machines networked and automated to the lowest possible overhead, to be contracted as-needed by manufacturers. Most cutting edge manufacturing processes start this way... they pop up in niche businesses until the technology is affordable enough, or the ROI is near enough, that you can start buying ones and twos for individual businesses spread around.

    5- You're constantly applying so many assumptions to people with no reason - you have a serious chip on your shoulder and are projecting.. either serious issues, or you're just making shit up to continue trolling - I guarantee no one gives a shit other than that you should lay off. Sorry if me alluding you're a dumbass is what fired you off. Though to be fair, you're not doing much to change my opinion there.

    6- You're assuming that capabilities automatically mean the status quo is obsolete. Until the /economics/ also exceed the status quo, it isn't better, yet. Yes, it's an uphill battle. On equal ground, the new thing might take the lead easily. But it isn't on equal ground. It's competing with an enemy that has a head start. It has the benefit of the economics of scale. The benefit of established logistics. The benefit of consumer normalcy. The benefit of widespread competitive pricing due to mass adoption. It takes more than 'capability' to become 'better'. Just because your theoretical $30k printer can make a part with much less raw material waste, fewer quantity of processes, and maybe even to a higher degree of precision, that doesn't mean you're more capable. Your factory probably spits out tons of parts-per-hour. Your machine would run at hours-per-part. What about springs? I may be wrong (wouldn't be surprised) but I haven't read anything in the heat treatment developments of laser sintered steels to suggest that a spring is capable of withstanding millions of cycles like your automotive suspensions would require. Can you 3d print a functional coil spring with existing heat treatment processes? Is anyone even close to that? Even a leaf spring? Yes, pneumatic or hydraulic dampeners are great, but are not, yet, standalone, and you couldn't make a good-enough bore that many times deeper than diameter, so those are out of consideration, currently, anyhow.

    7- Aside from the economics... 3d printing is FAR off from being able to replace many processes. Flatness, parallelism, perpendicularity, surface roughness, cylindricity of precision bores... these are the Achilles' heel of DMLS/SLS and other additive processes, and of the utmost importance to machine building. At the least, when additive processes become common, we'll still need traditional processes to refine the results (just like castings). The precision required to sinter or electron beam weld material together to get the necessary function of a bearing bore, or a sliding fit for a guide shaft, or ball screw carriage... it would be incredibly impractical with even the most cutting edge theoretical processes, maybe impossible still. Your best hope is the marriage of additive to traditional. Not replacement. You need some perspective.

    8- Are you familiar with typical manufacturing requirements for machine building? We make a lot of components and framework for robotic machinery, precision grinding and honing machines, and lots of tool&die work. Between our best mill machinists/toolmakers and wire edm processes, hitting tolerances over several inches within .0001s is routine. Perpendicularity within a few thou over 20+ inches is an occasional requirement. Think about what you think the most precise traditional machining process is... now understand that someone had to make those components even more precisely in order for that machine to perform as it does. Even with some in-situ adjustments, tramming, and alignments, you have to have something very true to begin with.

    Read more, post less - you'll benefit greatly.
    Very good writeup, but it is still the faster, cheaper, more accurate argument in many words. Feed it to the troll and it is still troll shit that will be flung back. The snot nose you are addressing won't understand one tenth of it. No point arguing, since the final arbiter is the market, both on the supply and consumer side. Now only if i could 3d print my cutie personal female robot...any ETA on that one?

    dee
    ;-D

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    @hanermo
    You can throw a block of titanium on the shelf and forget about it for years. Last I read, you have to store the raw titanium powder in a vacuum or inert gas bath to prevent complete oxidation that will annihilate the melting properties. Like you mention.. it's something many people forget/neglect.

    However, I believe the heat treatments of DMLS/SLS/SLM metal parts has managed to get typical porosity to a tenth of a percent. The parts were already head and shoulders about MIM parts, IRT porosity, but process improvements can get the raw parts at 0.1% porosity, with best results being less than that, even. With subsequent heat treatment that is still being developed, it improves more.

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    Jnieman,

    I love that response. Poetry only to fall on deaf ears.

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    Additive vs. subtractive is a technically and economically-driven choice, not a war. In fact, the current technologies are complementary.

    Additive sensationalists tend not to account for the complexity and depth of manufacturing infrastructure that supports machining. Specifically, the material alloying, refinement, forging/rolling/extruding, and heat treatment. It takes a huge amount of effort to produce raw materials that are homogenous and free of impurities/inclusions. These processes are manipulating material at the crystalline level. Furthermore, machining can be inserted anywhere in the manufacturing process chain: beginning, middle, and end. In contrast, 3D printing is a final process. With the exception of low temp age hardening, which has its own issues, 3D printed parts are generally not suitable for high temperature heat treatment.

    So for 3D printing to dominate, it not only needs to obsolete machining (cycle time, dimensional tolerance, and surface finish), but it also needs to obsolete machining's material infrastructure. DMLS and powdered metallurgy is a dead-end road in this regard. We need to see a game-changing technology that manipulates material at the crystalline (atomic?) level, not merely a maturation of existing technology.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Orange Vise View Post
    We need to see a game-changing technology that manipulates material at the crystalline (atomic?) level, not merely a maturation of existing technology.
    Printing at the molecular and sub molecular level is a distant probability, it is likely in a far distant future when a number of fundamental challenges are addressed related to putting an atomic or sub atomic particle in a location by external force and making it stay put. Can you even estimate the energy levels that will be necessary? Transporters? Beam me up Scotty.

    dee
    ;-D

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    very good now people who read this have good material to read

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    Quote Originally Posted by JNieman View Post
    I didn't need to look at his post history - I remembered seeing the dumbass tube cutting thread and immediately knowing he's out of place, here.

    For the fuck of it...

    1- the graph posted re: manufacturing tolerances is for the median expectable, with a side of caution, not the extent of capability. The graph was also drawn up in the early 20th century and never changed. It's just copied over and over, seemingly with fewer pixels each damned time, and reprinted ad infinitum.

    2- I'm not a machinist - I'm a designer (and sometimes programmer) who has been a machinist and programmer, and still can, working in manufacturing. I also personally own, and have put my own money into, additive manufacturing machinery. I also regularly sub out professional work when a process is required I don't have the capability of. I guarantee I know more than you do on this topic, judging by your posts, and am much better posed to take advantage of this technology at the point of full maturity. You're obviously just a fanboy with the most superficial experience.

    3- you'd do well to step off your high horse. This forum is not completely full of a bunch of over wearing ignorant rednecks that barely finished high school. There's a lot of engineers and highly formally educated people on here (seeing as it IS a professionally-aimed forum, and not for those cutting brass tube for toy projects while sitting in their living room) and people who've been formally trained on industry-specific topics over decades of experience, as well as actual leading subject-matter-experts in various disciplines and trades. You'd do well to relocate your humility.

    4- Many here (not me) are business owners. The primary goal of business owners is to make money. Those here are among those more educated on modern technology as they obviously are comfortable using the internet to stay abreast of what's happening in the world. If additive manufacturing is set to be profitable, I guarantee it'll start popping up more frequently in shops across the world. As it is, it's a niche process, which is why the best course right now, is for a shop to set up with an automated team of 3d printing machines networked and automated to the lowest possible overhead, to be contracted as-needed by manufacturers. Most cutting edge manufacturing processes start this way... they pop up in niche businesses until the technology is affordable enough, or the ROI is near enough, that you can start buying ones and twos for individual businesses spread around.

    5- You're constantly applying so many assumptions to people with no reason - you have a serious chip on your shoulder and are projecting.. either serious issues, or you're just making shit up to continue trolling - I guarantee no one gives a shit other than that you should lay off. Sorry if me alluding you're a dumbass is what fired you off. Though to be fair, you're not doing much to change my opinion there.

    6- You're assuming that capabilities automatically mean the status quo is obsolete. Until the /economics/ also exceed the status quo, it isn't better, yet. Yes, it's an uphill battle. On equal ground, the new thing might take the lead easily. But it isn't on equal ground. It's competing with an enemy that has a head start. It has the benefit of the economics of scale. The benefit of established logistics. The benefit of consumer normalcy. The benefit of widespread competitive pricing due to mass adoption. It takes more than 'capability' to become 'better'. Just because your theoretical $30k printer can make a part with much less raw material waste, fewer quantity of processes, and maybe even to a higher degree of precision, that doesn't mean you're more capable. Your factory probably spits out tons of parts-per-hour. Your machine would run at hours-per-part. What about springs? I may be wrong (wouldn't be surprised) but I haven't read anything in the heat treatment developments of laser sintered steels to suggest that a spring is capable of withstanding millions of cycles like your automotive suspensions would require. Can you 3d print a functional coil spring with existing heat treatment processes? Is anyone even close to that? Even a leaf spring? Yes, pneumatic or hydraulic dampeners are great, but are not, yet, standalone, and you couldn't make a good-enough bore that many times deeper than diameter, so those are out of consideration, currently, anyhow.

    7- Aside from the economics... 3d printing is FAR off from being able to replace many processes. Flatness, parallelism, perpendicularity, surface roughness, cylindricity of precision bores... these are the Achilles' heel of DMLS/SLS and other additive processes, and of the utmost importance to machine building. At the least, when additive processes become common, we'll still need traditional processes to refine the results (just like castings). The precision required to sinter or electron beam weld material together to get the necessary function of a bearing bore, or a sliding fit for a guide shaft, or ball screw carriage... it would be incredibly impractical with even the most cutting edge theoretical processes, maybe impossible still. Your best hope is the marriage of additive to traditional. Not replacement. You need some perspective.

    8- Are you familiar with typical manufacturing requirements for machine building? We make a lot of components and framework for robotic machinery, precision grinding and honing machines, and lots of tool&die work. Between our best mill machinists/toolmakers and wire edm processes, hitting tolerances over several inches within .0001s is routine. Perpendicularity within a few thou over 20+ inches is an occasional requirement. Think about what you think the most precise traditional machining process is... now understand that someone had to make those components even more precisely in order for that machine to perform as it does. Even with some in-situ adjustments, tramming, and alignments, you have to have something very true to begin with.

    Read more, post less - you'll benefit greatly.
    very good now people who read this have good material to read


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