Designing a 3D METAL printer - Page 4
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  1. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by 9100 View Post
    How about a MIG head and changing wire size for the resolution desired vs speed.

    Bill
    This is actually a great idea.

    Have also thought about combining wire-feed and pressure to produce a pressure semi-forging effect.

    Graphite might make a suitable electrode type.

    _____

    It must be possible to produce a nozzle that will pipe liquid metal and cool it quickly as it exits the nozzle with a cooling gas, probably nitrogen. For metals that benefit from rapid cooling such as amorphous glassy metals, possibly employing various powder or ceramic additives to vary the mechanical strength, it must be possible to do spot-casting rather than wire-bead welding.

    ______

    It might also be possible to produce a stacking pre-formed structure which is clamped by electrodes, heated, and forged into place with a tool (or possibly abrasive particle jet), like small 3D pixels, and electrically heat the pixels before attaching them to the structure, thus reducing the loss of heat and thermal expansion of the object being worked and accelerating cooling times.

    It might also be possible to use magnetic induction heating to heat a very small quantity of ferromagnetic metal to a liquid or viscous state before dropping it into place, but it'd likely work as a powerful mobile phone signal disruptor if not built accordingly.

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    In terms of combining laser-melting with milling with an interchangeable head, there's examples of that:


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    Check out ----> Servicing Stop <----

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    From what I have read, the aviation industry (which produces a few airplanes at a time, VERY different from the Automotive industry, etc) used 3D printed parts for complex air duct transitions etc...also you can 3D print in Ultem which is about half as strong as Aluminum in terms of yield strength...some call it plastic steel....so things ARE moving along for low-strength, high complexity parts such as these ducts anyway....

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    I have to wonder if building the part on a "slant" would alleviate some of the Z-axis anisotropy problems, distributing them down into the x and y axis resulting in a more homogeneous part?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Neil View Post
    I have to wonder if building the part on a "slant" would alleviate some of the Z-axis anisotropy problems, distributing them down into the x and y axis resulting in a more homogeneous part?
    I have a couple of hobby printers, and for certain higher-stress parts (Usually paintball markers) I do this, it works quite well for that purpose, but only if you know where it should fail, and what angle to put it on (typically 45 degrees for my uses) to give it the best strength.

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    It looks like theres some commercial machines that are printing with 5 micron tolerance: Micro Laser Sintering - Macro possibilities . Its just a matter of build instructions being leaked and then hobbyists will be making their own.

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    IMHO you guys have got it wrong - trying to go the wrong way. Yeah direct laser sintering is great, but its high powers, inert atmospheres and laser requirments make DIY hard.

    What would be way easier - simpler is to use the compression moulding powders used in sintered parts makeing. Simply using the low powered diode or co2 lasers heat to just bind the wax binder together. Simple post heat cycle in a small kiln and you have great parts. Yeah you have shrinkage to consider, but thats not too hard with cad cam to allow for. Might not be the way to make rocket motor nacells, but works well for things like smaller gears - bits. Massive amounts of the old style SLR camares internals were made by compression molded sintered parts, if you could do the basic part assembly with similar powders it would be a lot eaiser power wise than direct sintering.

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    A couple thoughts. Fiber lasers (not YAG) are already at 150 kw power levels with 80% efficiency and this will radically change the way laser sintering is done.

    3D printing is going to take us to other planets. Printing metal in a hard vacuum and no gravity should prove to be much easier. Picture a long straight beam with a solar concentrator at one end directly pumping a fiber laser mounted to a rotating beam. Printing a hemispherical end, tubular hull, intermediate bulkheads, central shaft, air ducts, equipment mounting pads, etc. All this could be low precision fabrication with in place machining of critical surfaces. Use compact materials sent up from earth as wire. Build a wire extrusion system in orbit. Grind and reuse failed satellites, booster stages, captured asteroids, whatever. Big ship built in space that shuttles between planets, large enough to be nuclear powered.

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    Will You need Aluminum To bulid the printer's Frame? My wahtsapp: +86 15841249643

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    Quote Originally Posted by ZD Aluminum View Post
    Will You need Aluminum To bulid the printer's Frame? My wahtsapp: +86 15841249643
    Excellent, SPAM!, we could build it out of SPAM!

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    Imagine every future garage shop using an induction heater, or its equivalent, to build up forms from molten droplets. Next, imagine said induction heaters being powered by wind turbines or solar cells. It doesn't take higher math skills to see those two futures as—face it—mutually antagonistic.

    But printing your own objects would eliminate the energy cost of transportation of said objects to you from a central factory. The cost component of, say, ocean transportation for small commodity products like coffee cups is itself so absurdly small that building them at the place of consumption will never make economic sense. Right now, even assuming the acrylic output of my printer would withstand the heat of a cup of coffee—which it definitely will not—the modeling and support materials are respectively $300 and $130 per liter (not counting the cost of transportation, which is usually FedEx since transport by ship would cut into its shelf life). That's one expensive cup. Given 15 hours print time, I could machine it from solid metal and weld on a handle at lower cost and in less time. Or, to employ reductio ad absurdum I could machine a mold to make the SOB (and thousands like it) from porcelain for the same cost, in about the same time. The value engineering component alone is more glaring than the transportation cost component.

    Even plastic 3D printing has several orders of magnitude of improvement to hurdle before it could meet the fevered expectations of its hypemongers. I can't imagine metal printing ever doing this. The best laser-deposition schemes are arguably not yet even one order of magnitude better than the mig-wire turd-laying exercise touted in everybody's favorite, the "Goodbye, machinists" thread.

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    That's cooldsc_2018.jpg

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    Quote Originally Posted by Oldwrench View Post
    The best laser-deposition schemes are arguably not yet even one order of magnitude better than the mig-wire turd-laying exercise touted in everybody's favorite, the "Goodbye, machinists" thread.
    Really?

    Solid Concepts 3D Prints Another Metal Gun, ‘Reason’, a 1mm Auto 1911 | 3DPrint.com | The Voice of 3D Printing / Additive Manufacturing

    I think you should read around the subject a little more ;-)


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