Did you guys see this from footwear industry?
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  1. #1
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    Default Did you guys see this from footwear industry?


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    That is pretty cool . . . I can’t say what I have seen in the Portland footwear innovation arena, but this is just the beginning of some significant innovations in the use of 3D printing in the footwear industry.

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    It's not quite ready for prime time in my experience. The resin technology from Carbon3D is amazing but they really struggle to print any part to the correct size on the first try. It can be tuned in but the first part always being a throw away is annoying.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TKassoc View Post
    It's not quite ready for prime time in my experience. The resin technology from Carbon3D is amazing but they really struggle to print any part to the correct size on the first try. It can be tuned in but the first part always being a throw away is annoying.
    Dimensional accuracy has been a challenge for me on my metal framed Prusa i3. I've spent hours and hours calibrating it. Although it's FDM and not resin type, so I'm not sure if one it easier than the other.

    I find it interesting that the 3D printing world is now shifting their focus to making the machines more user friendly. I just don't understand how they can overcome the nuances with printing something, because so many things need to be considered when generating the g code. Like layer orientation for a structural part, dimensional compensations for CTQ features, etc. Seems like there is a need software that can take a model, get some input from the user on basic usage, and generate a best fit type of parameters. But you still are well beyond grandma being able to print a replacement part for her vacuum (well, unless Dyson releases all their CAD to their customers!)

    I guess it would make more sense to have specific purpose printers, like this shoe one, where it does one general shape/thing really well, but can't print whatever you want.


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