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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by egh214 View Post
    ... I am saying that you couldn't predict its slip plane distribution and thus not predict as well where the weak spots in your print would be, as far as any work I am aware of. ...
    Why can't you predict the slip planes? You know the alloy and the heat treat history. You know it was directionally solidified - the heat enters the top and exits the bottom. You know the thickness of each layer. There should be a preferred orientation from solidification and layers(or partial layers) of fully recrystallized grains between. If you know the solidification direction and the crystal structure, then you know the preferred slip planes. The fully recrystallized grains will likely also have a preferred orientation since they are growing on top of grains with a preferential orinetation.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave G. View Post
    Why can't you predict the slip planes? You know the alloy and the heat treat history. You know it was directionally solidified - the heat enters the top and exits the bottom. You know the thickness of each layer. There should be a preferred orientation from solidification and layers(or partial layers) of fully recrystallized grains between. If you know the solidification direction and the crystal structure, then you know the preferred slip planes. The fully recrystallized grains will likely also have a preferred orientation since they are growing on top of grains with a preferential orinetation.
    From what I understand it comes from adding a layer of hot metal on top of a layer of hot metal. You can't predict the cooling rate of the full part. This is also an issue if some of the walls are thinner than others, with a different cooling rate you have different grain growth and thus a more unpredictable structure. The prints that seem to work well are slow prints, that are fed a large amount of metal and following this have to be put through an array of testing to make sure they don't have issues.

    I really think they could have solved this problem as I am seeing some really awesome metal prints out there. I really just want to know how they solved this. From what I have heard the only way to solve this would be to be able to predict the temperature of each layer and have your machine adjust the weld temperature accordingly to create uniformity in the piece, thus making quality welds.

    I work in a metal manufacturing plant and I am interested in this for future endeavors, I just don't want to invest the money if this is still an issue or if its going to cost 500K-1Mil for a quality print. I'll email my professor who was researching this and this post doc student I went to grad school with and see if I can come up with any papers and such for you guys to check out.

    I would also like to clarify, I bet this printer is awesome! I don't mean to talk down on this product, if that is how it is coming off. I meant to just give a heads up about some inherent metal printing issues that I am aware of that you don't see anyone talk about outside of the academic community. By all means this thing probably makes an awesome print and most likely has some amazing applications!

  3. #23
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    I requested quotations for aluminum and stainless parts the replies were very high apparently due to the required supports that needed to be also printed. Is it possible to print over a pre-cast piece of let's say plaster to act a support?

    Is the temperature window between sintering and melting so small that you require a $60K furnace? PID temperature controls are precise and kilns can contain stainless steel containers that can be continually purged with inert gas.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by egh214 View Post
    From what I have heard the only way to solve this would be to be able to predict the temperature of each layer and have your machine adjust the weld temperature accordingly to create uniformity in the piece, thus making quality welds.
    I'm sure if Fronius can do it (and have done it) with manual and robotic welding (even with wildly dissimilar metals), 3D metal printing manufacturers can do it too. It's really pretty simple to correct for.

  5. #25
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    I just want to print electrodes.. can someone make that happen this month please? Ill actually buy that. cash in hand.

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Motorsports-X View Post
    I just want to print electrodes.. can someone make that happen this month please? Ill actually buy that. cash in hand.
    EOS can DLMS copper EOS Additive Manufacturing of high-quality metal parts I think you might be be underestimating the price tag though...


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