This steel 3d printing machine makes machinists obsolete. Goodbye machinists!
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    Default This steel 3d printing machine makes machinists obsolete. Goodbye machinists!

    This 3d printing machine uses a combination of mig welding wire 3d printing and machining to make machining quality 3d prints. Because the piece is machined as it is 3d printed, it requires no repositioning of the work. This means that it is able to print shapes that were previously impossible with machining. It eliminates the need for having a lathe and other machines.

    The cost savings from eliminating the machinist are huge. Several of these machines can be put to work in parallel increasing production while money is saved in labor costs by not hiring machinists. The projected cost is $3000 dollars, which is even cheaper than traditional mills.

    First a rought shape is 3d printed with mig wire like so:

    p2.jpg

    The part is machine as it is being 3d printed to end up with a part like this:

    w3.jpg

    Here is a prototype of the machine:

    rsz_ability3d-brings-metal-3d-printing-your-desktop-888-3d-printer-milling-hybrid-2.jpg


    Just thought I would let you know so you can start training and equipping your shop with these machines, or looking for another line of work.

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    News alert!!!

    Investment casting makes machinists obsolete.

    Metalurgists and Patternmakers seen in high demand.

    In other words: "Set the wayback machine Mr. Peabody".

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    Quote Originally Posted by jCandlish View Post
    News alert!!!

    Investment casting makes machinists obsolete.

    Metalurgists and Patternmakers seen in high demand.

    In other words: "Set the wayback machine Mr. Peabody".
    This doesn't have anything to do with investment casting. Please make logical arguments.

    first-they-ignore-you-then-they-laugh-you-then-they-fight-you-then-you-win-gandhi-jayanti-wis.jpg

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    Quote Originally Posted by jsmith3322 View Post
    Please make logical arguments.
    Those parts look like shit.

    Literally.

    Shit.


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    WOW, Those parts look WAY better than anything I can make with my foolish, obsolete, old fashioned lathes, mills and grinders. I give up, I just sent word to the wellfare office, I'll be down tomorrow, sign me up! Will anyone be available this weekend to help me drag all my machines to the scrap yard?

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    Yup, somebody who's never done any real machining or welding has a process/product that's gonna make everything else obsolete. For complicated shapes where strength isn't a primary concern it could be a real time-saver but I don't see it working for everything. If you need a 4" diameter pin for an excavator or crane why would you go to all the trouble of building up a piece of material and then machining it down. It would be far faster to start with a solid shaft and do the necessary work to it--I'm sure the shaft would be far stronger as well.

    Just another tool in the box...

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    I thought this was a forum for professionals? Original post reported. scum

    because responding is kind of funny: sorry kid, we're going to keep machinists on the pay-roll. they have this cool ability where they can turn all these bars of metal into good parts without buying any new equipment... you'd be surprised how cost effective it is, if you stepped into the real world some day.

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    Here is an investment cast bear:



    That is cast from Nickel-Chromium Steel.

    It is a test piece for a GE turbine blade casting process that Dad was involved with in the late '50s.

    That material is tougher than a whore's heart ... over 50 years ago.

    Do keep up.

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    You again?

    Fuck off with the trolling shit, already.

    You don't know what you're talking about. We've been over this: Additive manufacturing's impact on subtractive manufacturing

    ETA: Robotic autofeed welding has been around for decades and people have been using it like this POS machine in the OP for almost as long. It hasn't caught on because it makes shit. Good luck with that smaller shitbox.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jCandlish View Post
    Here is an investment cast bear:



    That is cast from Nickel-Chromium Steel.

    It is a test piece for a GE turbine blade casting process that Dad was involved with in the late '50s.

    That material is tougher than a whore's heart ... over 50 years ago.

    Do keep up.
    That's a very nice bear.

    It's good to keep our minds open to new technologies. We all benefit from better technologies and the new things that we may be able to make with them.

    A machine like this would revolutionize the world. It would never be the same again.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jsmith3322 View Post
    That's a very nice bear.

    It's good to keep our minds open to new technologies. We all benefit from better technologies and the new things that we may be able to make with them.

    A machine like this would revolutionize the world. It would never be the same again.
    Just to add some context - have you graduated from High School yet?

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    Those pieces look like pottery done without a wheel by a new student using the "rope" method. LMAO at your hilarious post, which obviously was meant to be funny.

    I'm sure such a machine might come in handy on an expedition to Mars, where they can't carry tons of bar stock and so wouldn't mind taking forever to wait for the machine to slowly build up pieces that might otherwise take months to arrive from earth.

    Having seen how well a modern CNC can carve beautifully finished pieces out of tough stainless steels I expect most shops will be eager to discard their obsolete machinery as soon as they can get their hands on this new marvel of technology.

    Oh look - there's another flock of those flying pigs!

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    Quote Originally Posted by jsmith3322 View Post
    That's a very nice bear.

    It's good to keep our minds open to new technologies. We all benefit from better technologies and the new things that we may be able to make with them.

    A machine like this would revolutionize the world. It would never be the same again.
    It sure would shake things up. I bet there would be a massive resurgence in blacksmithing, an ancient technique that could outperform that machine in speed, finish, and strength.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Milland View Post
    Just to add some context - have you graduated from High School yet?
    Hmm, and I was thinking he just graduated from some really fancy "design" college where free thinking was the order of the day rather than practicality and useful experience(like in the real word, or real engineering programs). But, I could be wrong, maybe he is still in high school. Almost certainly one or the other though. My other guess is that he just may be the salesman for these pos $3000 machines that he endorses so strongly.

    +1 on the pottery thing! I still have some crappy bowl thing I made in the 4th or 5th grade, looks just like the op's stuff.

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    jsmith3322, let's put this in perspective, OK? Additive machining is a useful tool, but it has relatively few commercial uses right now. It's never going to replace subtractive machining, but I would expect it to slowly expand out of few niches it currently holds. Let's talk about those niches:
    * Repair on wear parts. Putting metal on prior to re-turning journals or re-boring pin holes. Very mature area, typically welding or hot-powder spray. Enables but in no way replaces subtractive machining.
    * Low-quantity, high-value near-net composite parts. Somewhat mature area, typically CNC fiber layers, multi-op process. Minimizes subtractive machining, but still a need for form trimming, cutouts, hole drilling, etc.
    * Low-quantity, high-value near-net metal parts. Growth area, multiple technologies under development. Can be good replacement for investment casting in small quantities, with similar minimization of subtractive 2nd ops.

    None of those niches is going to put subtractive machinists out of business.

    Probably the largest number of additive machining systems are in an entirely different space: achingly low-volume, appalling low-value, toy generation. Those aren't going to put any professional in any field out of work.

    1st fundamental problem with current additive machining technologies is production time. It's just too damned slow right now, and must get several orders of magnitude faster before it can be a viable competitor against conventional subtractive machining for even small quantity jobs. I doubt that it will ever become a mass production process (by which I mean dedicated production process like casting, forging, stamping/forming, not Joe Jobshop).

    2nd fundamental problem with current additive machining technologies is the inherent tradeoff between surface finishes and production time. Rough-casting equivalent finish is OK for many purposes, but there are very, very few rough castings that do not require some sort of post-casting machining op.

    Additive machining shares a fundamental capability with casting that cannot be replicated with subtractive machining, and that's the ability to form internal spaces (coring). This is the capability I think offers the greatest growth potential for additive machining. However, like casting, more challenging internal spaces require structural support analogous to chaplets. When working in metals, those supports can be hard/impossible to remove.

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    I recently made a 20-hour print time Pokemon piggy bank (bulbasaur-bank, I guess) for my son. That was pretty fun.

    You fuckers really missed out on a sweet job, there, lemme tell ya.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JNieman View Post
    I recently made a 20-hour print time Pokemon piggy bank (bulbasaur-bank, I guess) for my son. That was pretty fun.

    You fuckers really missed out on a sweet job, there, lemme tell ya.
    I feel sorry for the lathe machines and machinists you put out of work with that. it's just gonna get worse I tell ya. I bet China is all over this shit

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    The OP assumes that the only way to shape metal is machining. Each one of the shapes shown can be made by processes other and machining. Now if he wants to talk about intentional void in the middle of a bar of steel, then he's got something to talk about.

    Tom

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    Quote Originally Posted by sfriedberg View Post
    jsmith3322, let's put this in perspective, OK? Additive machining is a useful tool, but it has relatively few commercial uses right now. It's never going to replace subtractive machining, but I would expect it to slowly expand out of few niches it currently holds. Let's talk about those niches:
    * Repair on wear parts. Putting metal on prior to re-turning journals or re-boring pin holes. Very mature area, typically welding or hot-powder spray. Enables but in no way replaces subtractive machining.
    * Low-quantity, high-value near-net composite parts. Somewhat mature area, typically CNC fiber layers, multi-op process. Minimizes subtractive machining, but still a need for form trimming, cutouts, hole drilling, etc.
    * Low-quantity, high-value near-net metal parts. Growth area, multiple technologies under development. Can be good replacement for investment casting in small quantities, with similar minimization of subtractive 2nd ops.

    None of those niches is going to put subtractive machinists out of business.

    Probably the largest number of additive machining systems are in an entirely different space: achingly low-volume, appalling low-value, toy generation. Those aren't going to put any professional in any field out of work.

    1st fundamental problem with current additive machining technologies is production time. It's just too damned slow right now, and must get several orders of magnitude faster before it can be a viable competitor against conventional subtractive machining for even small quantity jobs. I doubt that it will ever become a mass production process (by which I mean dedicated production process like casting, forging, stamping/forming, not Joe Jobshop).

    2nd fundamental problem with current additive machining technologies is the inherent tradeoff between surface finishes and production time. Rough-casting equivalent finish is OK for many purposes, but there are very, very few rough castings that do not require some sort of post-casting machining op.

    Additive machining shares a fundamental capability with casting that cannot be replicated with subtractive machining, and that's the ability to form internal spaces (coring). This is the capability I think offers the greatest growth potential for additive machining. However, like casting, more challenging internal spaces require structural support analogous to chaplets. When working in metals, those supports can be hard/impossible to remove.
    I don't like the term subtractive machinist! It makes me feel somehow "less than", and I am deeply offended. I think we need to come up with a politically correct alternative, any suggestions? Hopefully, it will be a really long phrase that we can then turn into a cool acronym.

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    "Please make logical arguments"

    - quote of the day


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