Can I use a Fadal 3016 w/4th axis for a 3D Printer?
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  1. #1
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    Default Can I use a Fadal 3016 w/4th axis for a 3D Printer?

    Hi All,

    I have a Fadal vmc. My son has been pestering me for a 3D printer.

    I see many print heads,parts, etc on Amazon. MUCH cheaper than buying a decent home use 3D printer in the $1k-3k price range.

    Is there a kit or way to use my fadal as the x-y-z motion for a 3D printer?

    Has anyone done this with a Fadal vmc? I do see desktop mills being used and some company converting a Hurco vmc.

    My son's projects are often large so the 30" x 16" travel of the VMC is a plus (if useable)

    Thanks for any help.

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    Given that DMG sells a ($2M) DMU with a plasma deposition head ("3d printing in stainless steel") I'm sure you could get it to work.

    You are going to have to figure out to mount, support, and feed material to the hot head, all without damaging your Fadal, but given the weight of the hobby stuff, I'd think the whole rig could be attached to a CAT-40 tool holder.

    Control might be a little funky....

    I don't have my Prusa yet, so I can't tell you whether trying to copy that design into a VMC shell is a good plan or not - but from what I read details like what the build plate is made of, how level it is, its temp, etc. matter.

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    Control might be a little funky....

    That's my main concern. I think the build plate could just be switch controlled. I was hoping that maybe I could use the "M" function from the control to trigger the flow of plastic, etc. I just do not know how the print heads actually work....

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    The print head on a 3d printer is a 4th axis. It is coordinated with the x&y axis velocity. It also reverses when stopping to suck back the filament so it doesn’t smear during a rapid move. The print head is heated and you need a temperature controller for that as the temperature must be very consistent. Most plastics other than PLA need a heated print surface too. The heating controllers can be turned off and on by M codes. I set up my home built mill for 3d printing but haven’t finished it as I installed a new PLC recently.

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    People have been doing it for a while now.
    3ders.org - 3DP Unlimited's large format X1 3D printer lets you print bigger | 3D Printer News & 3D Printing News

    You may want to download a 3dprinting slicer like CURA and look at it's output, which is just g-code, and see if you can make that work with your fadal controller.

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