16" Lodge and Shipley Advice Needed - Page 3
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  1. #41
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    Here`s a couple more pics and some commentary....

    img_0275-1024x768-.jpg

    img_0276-1024x768-.jpg

    In the parts list and diagrams that I have, it appears that the spindle for the tail stock, was directly engraved in inches of travel for drilling and boring operations. Instead,I have this shallow slot milled into the spindle.

    img_0277-1024x768-.jpg

    I assume that there would have been a stainless rule, pressed into the groove. Has anyone seen this....

    I will likely find a suitable ruler, and cut it to fit.

    Brian

  2. #42
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    Well, I found the answer on another site to my query about the tail stock groove, although, I had already assumed that a rule would have been pressed into it. I found a Brown and Sharpe 6" rule that fits nicely. It will do.

    img_0278-1024x768-.jpg

    I took the compound rest apart last night, to see why it was a little frozen in it's travel. I rightly, suspected the tapered gib. The rear of the screw slot had been broken out at some point, and someone flipped it over, cut another groove, and also broke that out. They had a combination of washers that really didn't work that well, allowing the gib to travel forward and bind.

    img_0282-768x1024-.jpg

    Here's a pic of the cross slide gib beside it for comparison...

    img_0283-768x1024-.jpg

    I plan on milling the end of the gib flat, and even with the back side of the slot, then mechanically fastening a tab of steel to the end, and making a proper shoulder screw with a nice fit.

    The bottom of the compound is a little worn, but still shows good signs of the original flaking.

    img_0279-768x1024-.jpg

    img_0281-1024x768-.jpg

    The micrometer dial seems to be frozen to the micrometer bushing, so that will be fairly difficult to free up. It's not surprising, given the amount of rust on the handle of the dial.

    Brian

  3. #43
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    Hi Brian, I've never seen a " Brown & Sharpe " rule that was " Made In England " before. " Starrett " had a factory in Jedburgh, Scotland but I'd love to know where the " Brown & Sharpe factory was.

    Regards Tyrone.

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  5. #44
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    Not much to add right now, but I did receive my McCrosky tool post in the mail today...

    I had been looking for a quick change tool post and holders on Ebay, but then I came across this McCrosky 5 1/2" turret tool post and bought it.

    img_0323-1024x768-.jpg

    img_0324-1024x768-.jpg

    img_0325-1024x768-.jpg

    I have a bucket full of big carbide tool holders that will fit this, as well as some large HSS, and this size is just right for my lathe. For what I do in my shop, this tool post will do nicely.

    Brian

  6. #45
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    Folks have a love / hate relationship with those - the very best of the four ways. Basically a solid no nonsense item that helped win at least two major wars.

    Old ones came with curved bottoms of tool slot and four rockers. Later, everyone just kept piles of shims handy to set tool height

    I have a 5 1/2 and a 7, but have not seen an 8 1/2 that I could afford yet.






    Quote Originally Posted by Sachmanram View Post
    Not much to add right now, but I did receive my McCrosky tool post in the mail today...

    I had been looking for a quick change tool post and holders on Ebay, but then I came across this McCrosky 5 1/2" turret tool post and bought it.

    I have a bucket full of big carbide tool holders that will fit this, as well as some large HSS, and this size is just right for my lathe. For what I do in my shop, this tool post will do nicely.

    Brian

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  8. #46
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    Hello John,

    Well, I will learn to love this one... I did some research on these before I committed to buy. It is very stoutly built and a rather ingenious design for indexing and clamping. It must have cost a small fortune when they were new on the market.

    I simply could not justify the cost of a used Aloris tool post and tool holders for this lathe. Especially as I make most of my money at carpentry. I am looking down the road at retirement, and may be able to augment my pensions with some machine work, though. Until then, Mr. McCrosky will fit the bill.

    John, what do you have that would take an 8 1/2 ? ...

    A size 7 is a monster....

    Brian

  9. #47
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    I like such things - don't have to have something for them to fit on



    Quote Originally Posted by Sachmanram View Post
    Hello John,

    Well, I will learn to love this one... I did some research on these before I committed to buy. It is very stoutly built and a rather ingenious design for indexing and clamping. It must have cost a small fortune when they were new on the market.

    I simply could not justify the cost of a used Aloris tool post and tool holders for this lathe. Especially as I make most of my money at carpentry. I am looking down the road at retirement, and may be able to augment my pensions with some machine work, though. Until then, Mr. McCrosky will fit the bill.

    John, what do you have that would take an 8 1/2 ? ...

    A size 7 is a monster....

    Brian

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  11. #48
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    I just came up from the shop..... I worked on getting both the cross feed and compound dials pressed apart. They both had their micrometer dials frozen to the micrometer bushings and this was unacceptable to me. The cross feed dial pressed apart easily, as it's construction provided a solid means of pressing, but the compound feed dial was another story. Because of it's construction, I had to make a pressing sleeve with a bore just .002" larger than the micrometer bushing, as the micrometer dial was sticking out by maybe .060" beyond the circumference of the bushing. When I bought the lathe, there was a largish piece of bar that was already partially drilled and bore on one end, so it became the fortuitous donor.

    I have no idea what kind of steel it was, but it machined nicely with carbide tooling.

    img_0355-768x1024-.jpg

    img_0356-768x1024-.jpg

    img_0362-768x1024-.jpg

    img_0365-1024x768-.jpg

    img_0366-1024x768-.jpg

    I had drilled a through hole, in case things got bound up inside, so that I could press the whole works back out. This didn't happen. I knew that I had not bored deep enough for the entire micrometer dial to come off of the bushing, but reasoned that if I got it the 1/2" pressed off that I had room for, I'd come up with something if it needed additional help.

    Brian

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    I'll include a few additional pics of the process of pressing the dial off.

    img_0367-768x1024-.jpg

    img_0371-768x1024-.jpg

    I got this far and had to resort to some ingenuity..... I had a bearing separator on hand, and utilizing some hold down bolts, T-nuts, etc. I cobbled together something that I could press it out the rest of the way.

    img_0374-768x1024-.jpg

    The compound micrometer dial had two ball bearings and springs, while the cross feed dial had one spring with an integral rod to provide the friction. Curious.....

    img_0376-768x1024-.jpg

    img_0375-768x1024-.jpg

    Brian

    This goes to show, that even the simplest of repairs, sometimes requires considerable time and effort. You have to love doing this, and not expect to ever get your time in currency, if you ever sell the machine that you put so much time into.

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    Hello gang

    I don't have a lot of new things to share on the L&S, but I have been looking into replacing the present 10HP 575v 3 phase motor, with a 230v 3 phase motor, and also, looking to upgrade my present 10HP RPC by adding an additional 10HP 3 phase motor. Finding a good used 3 phase motor, with the right RPM, voltage, and frame size, around here, is like trying to find hen's teeth.

    So, I called my local electric motor repair shop to see about new motors, and ended up buying these two. The Leeson, I believe, is a reconditioned motor, while the Techtop is new.

    I couldn't possibly have an old motor rewound for the price of these two motors, with a 3 year warranty.

    img_0432-1024x768-.jpg

    img_0433-1024x768-.jpg

    So, with the present 10HP 3 phase motor on my RPC, I now have 3 identical framed motors, with identical RPM's, voltages,etc.

    One will go on the lathe, and the other two will build my new RPC.

    Brian

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    In addition, I was pleasantly surprised when I walked by the lathe, the other day, to see two puddles of way oil, coming from the apron oil pump, onto the cross slide ways, and also way oil on the bed ways from the saddle. Now, that is promising....

    img_0452-1024x768-.jpg

    img_0453-1024x768-.jpg

    img_0454-1024x768-.jpg

    I will still go ahead and completely take the saddle and apron apart, to make sure that all of the bearings are good, and that the oiling system is working as it should.

    Now, on to the head stock. When I first took the head stock cover off, to inspect the gearing, I noticed a fine line of black spray inside the top. I also can see a very dark line in the oil sight glass at the rear of the head stock.

    img_0455-1024x768-.jpg

    I am preparing to remove the oil sump to inspect things and get fresh oil back into the head stock. I will also remove the oil filter to clean it up.

    What would be the best method of flushing any crud out the bottom of the gear box, before filling with fresh oil, in my case? I have plenty of kerosene on hand.

    Brian

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    Have enjoyed reading this thread. I have an old cone head Lodge and Shipley. It's a good machine, but not in the same league as yours.

    IMHO your L&S represents the "golden era" - when MANY manufacturers (foreign and domestic) were building the very best manual machine tools.

    Looks like it has a good home.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sachmanram View Post
    What would be the best method of flushing any crud out the bottom of the gear box, before filling with fresh oil, in my case? I have plenty of kerosene on hand.

    Brian
    I use diesel fuel, or kerosene would also work well. Drain the oil, fill or partly fill with fuel, run it (no load) if you can, brush and spray if you can't. Drain and rinse with more fuel if you like, refill with oil.

    If real nasty try to get the bulk of it out and rinse before the above.

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  20. #54
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    The most important thing to know is that oil is actually being brought up from sump low on back to oil stuff inside HS. There is no oil in headstock.
    How did the sump look? - I was amazed mine was so clean

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    Hello John

    I assume that your question was directed at me? I haven't taken the sump off yet, as my above question was to guide me, before I got things apart, so, I don't know what I will find. But, the dark line in the sight window, and the fine line of black spray that was present on the inside of the cover, tell me that there will likely be some crud in the bottom.

    I am planning on taking things apart on the weekend, carefully noting and measuring all of the adjusting nuts on the clutch/brake linkages, before I remove them to remove the oil sump.

    This linkage, as you noted, is a very clever and carefully thought out system, allowing a good range of adjustment for the forward and reverse engagement.

    In addition, if you remove the clutch cover plate at the top rear of the head stock, you can further fine tune the clutch and brake.

    Thanks for your input, Grigg... as I am unable to power this lathe up at the present time, I will do my best to clean it out without power to the lathe. I can always do it again, once it is in it's resting place and powered up.

    I also have to look into the quick change gearbox and do the same. The lead screw lever is very stiff to turn, so I'll sort that out when I get there.

    My paying work is frenetically busy right now..... I am trying to get the roof closed in a very large winery building, before winter really hits us. I will be working through the Christmas holidays, but will likely take a couple of weeks off in January, where I can devote some solid time to this lathe.

    I am so impressed with this lathe so far, and am very excited to really get working on it full time. I still have to get the lathe turned, and over to it's designated spot in the shop, but I want to pull the lead screw, feed rod and clutch rod, in order to remove the apron and saddle to get them cleaned and back to good order, before I move the lathe.

    Brian

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    Well, a few weeks later, and I finally got down to the shop to have a look at the oil sump, etc.

    As I removed the first drain plug, at the rear of the head stock, the first thing to come out was clean water..... not a lot, but not what I wanted to see. Mind you, it had been outside for a couple of years before I bought it. Next, was dark oil and some sludge. I expected to see some sludge, given the fine spray line on the inside of the head stock cover, upon my initial inspection.

    img_0511-768x1024-.jpg

    Next, was the Cuno oil filter at the front of the head stock. Upon removing the oil drain plug under the oil filter, again, I got a small amount of water, and then sludgy dark oil. Altogether, between the three oil drain cocks, I drained maybe 1 litre of oil, and a cup full of water. The Cuno oil filter looked in real good shape, with a bit of sludge on top of the fins.

    img_0512-768x1024-.jpg

    img_0513-768x1024-.jpg

    img_0514-768x1024-.jpg

    I had been waiting to do this inspection, as I had ordered a 5 gallon pail of Mobil Heavy Medium Mineral Oil.

    I will add more narrative and pics in the next post.

    Brian

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sachmanram View Post
    Well, a few weeks later, and I finally got down to the shop to have a look at the oil sump, etc.

    As I removed the first drain plug, at the rear of the head stock, the first thing to come out was clean water..... not a lot, but not what I wanted to see. Mind you, it had been outside for a couple of years before I bought it. Next, was dark oil and some sludge. I expected to see some sludge, given the fine spray line on the inside of the head stock cover, upon my initial inspection.

    img_0511-768x1024-.jpg

    Next, was the Cuno oil filter at the front of the head stock. Upon removing the oil drain plug under the oil filter, again, I got a small amount of water, and then sludgy dark oil. Altogether, between the three oil drain cocks, I drained maybe 1 litre of oil, and a cup full of water. The Cuno oil filter looked in real good shape, with a bit of sludge on top of the fins.

    img_0512-768x1024-.jpg

    img_0513-768x1024-.jpg

    img_0514-768x1024-.jpg

    I had been waiting to do this inspection, as I had ordered a 5 gallon pail of Mobil Heavy Medium Mineral Oil.

    I will add more narrative and pics in the next post.

    Brian
    Hi Brian, I once made the mistake of trying to take one of those filters apart. That was easy, getting it all back together again wasn't.

    Regards Tyrone.

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  25. #58
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    My next step, was to remove the oil sump itself, at the rear of the head stock. In order to remove the sump, I had to remove the 1/2" oil line that feeds the pump, as well as two connecting rods for the clutch system. I carefully recorded the existing positioning of the rods, in relation to the nuts securing them.

    img_0516-768x1024-.jpg

    img_0517-768x1024-.jpg

    I did this to the vertical clutch rod, as well as the cross rod, which attaches to the square clutch rod at the front of the lathe.

    I next supported the oil sump with wood on the motor and motor mount. I wasn't sure just how heavy the oil sump would be.

    img_0523-1024x768-.jpg

    It turned out to be very manageable, maybe 50 lbs. at the most. I pulled it out and placed it on a board on the floor.

    img_0524-768x1024-.jpg

    There was some black sludge in the bottom, which was to be expected, but what alarmed me was the broken teeth... !!!


    img_0526-1024x768-.jpg

    All seven of them... !!! There may be more, lurking in the sludge. This could mean two things.... a proper repair was done with the gear in question, and the sump was never cleaned out, or, it might mean that I have a "toothless wonder" inside the head stock. There is a large cover plate just above the oil sump, at the rear of the head stock, that might give a better view of the lower gearing. In hindsight, I should have also removed this cover upon my initial inspection, as I could not place the lathe under power.

    Until I have a look behind this cover, the jury is out. Whatever I find, I will forge ahead and fix what needs fixing.

    Brian

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sachmanram View Post
    My next step, was to remove the oil sump itself, at the rear of the head stock. In order to remove the sump, I had to remove the 1/2" oil line that feeds the pump, as well as two connecting rods for the clutch system. I carefully recorded the existing positioning of the rods, in relation to the nuts securing them.

    img_0516-768x1024-.jpg

    img_0517-768x1024-.jpg

    I did this to the vertical clutch rod, as well as the cross rod, which attaches to the square clutch rod at the front of the lathe.

    I next supported the oil sump with wood on the motor and motor mount. I wasn't sure just how heavy the oil sump would be.

    img_0523-1024x768-.jpg

    It turned out to be very manageable, maybe 50 lbs. at the most. I pulled it out and placed it on a board on the floor.

    img_0524-768x1024-.jpg

    There was some black sludge in the bottom, which was to be expected, but what alarmed me was the broken teeth... !!!


    img_0526-1024x768-.jpg

    All seven of them... !!! There may be more, lurking in the sludge. This could mean two things.... a proper repair was done with the gear in question, and the sump was never cleaned out, or, it might mean that I have a "toothless wonder" inside the head stock. There is a large cover plate just above the oil sump, at the rear of the head stock, that might give a better view of the lower gearing. In hindsight, I should have also removed this cover upon my initial inspection, as I could not place the lathe under power.

    Until I have a look behind this cover, the jury is out. Whatever I find, I will forge ahead and fix what needs fixing.

    Brian
    Nobody I know doing a " proper repair " would leave the missing teeth in the sump Brian. Prepare to see a gear with missing teeth unless I'm very much mistaken. I had a telescopic magnet for exactly that sort of eventuality. In fact I had several, all different sizes.

    Regards Tyrone.

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    Hello Tyrone

    I do expect, as you suspect, that I will find a toothless gear in the head stock. That will be unfortunate, and, likely, expensive. I will wait for the weekend to take that cover off to see what lies behind it. I have been very ill all Christmas holidays, and am back at work tomorrow.

    Brian


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