1945-46 Brown & Sharpe No.1 Universal grinder #5426 - Page 3
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  1. #41
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    Correction to previous post. It looks like I miss-read the parts list, and the #1 shares the same wheel spindle as the #2-4.

    -Doug

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    Quote Originally Posted by Elam Works View Post
    Correction to previous post. It looks like I miss-read the parts list, and the #1 shares the same wheel spindle as the #2-4.

    -Doug
    Easy to tell - 2, 3 and 4 wheel spindles have 2" bearing journals at least 4" long - these are the smooth round areas you see if you slip off the semi-spherical bearing "boxes"

    My spare spindle / boxes/ pulley assy for the #4 weighs at least 80 Lbs

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    Extremely well detailed, described, and illustrated job.

    -Marty-

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    John,

    That makes it easy then, the #1 is definitely a smaller spindle. The journals are only about 7/8 diameter.

    The parts list is a little confusing in that it only gives one part number for the wheel spindle (part #1). In other instances it footnotes parts that are unique to either the #1 or to the #2-4; but in the case of the spindle - and obviously now other items - it apparently relies on the owner supplying the model and serial number to receive the correct replacement.

    I did think it odd to come to the delusion they were the same size, as the book was clear the #2-4 were offered with a slightly larger and wider set of default stones. Granted it was clear a different hub for the wheel was used, but a larger spindle too makes natural sense.

    -Doug

  5. #45
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    Default 1945-46 Brown & Sharpe No.1 Universal grinder #5426

    Now a trip into the spindle bearing construction. Actually I think the bearing construction is probably the most interesting aspect of the spindle. Besides, the spindle is pretty much all about the bearings.

    The first picture shows the right hand pillow block (the book calls them wheel bearing sleeves) and its journal. Back against the pulley flange is one of the steel thrust washers with three grooves cut in the face to allow oil through. There is another, captive thrust washer in the other end of the pillow block. Some of the extensive spiral oil grooves can be seen inside the bronze bearing.

    The second picture shows an isolated spindle bearing and its pillow block. The curious spherical shape nestles in the wheel head clamps (see previous post), and presumably its self-aligning properties prevents any misalignment stress being applied to the bearings. It is important to remember the hole seen goes up, so the oil from the drip-feed is not cut off! The threaded end caps on the two pillow blocks are subtly different so they cannot be interchanged. The one on the right has thrust washers to control the axial end-float of the spindle, and the one on the left does not and can ‘float’ on the shaft slightly. In this picture the retaining nuts have been backed off a little so you can see the joint between the nuts and the housing.

    Third picture simply shows the nuts removed. Many of these nuts would use the same c-spanner in the tool kit. One of the several tools we are missing, but a universal c-spanner works just as well until a specific wrench can be made. These don’t get done up Godzilla-tight.

    Fourth picture shows the bronze sleeve removed. The outside is tapered and there is a matching taper in the pillow block. One nut draws the bronze further in to the taper of the pillow block and the other locks it, or pulls the taper back out, as needed. The large oblong window/slot is for the felt oil wiper and spring, seen adjacent. When installed in the wheel head, the felts are at the bottom of the bearing.

    Last picture is another view of the sleeve and housing. The bronze is split so that it can collapse, and this is how the radial clearance is adjusted. One completely bisects the bush through the window for the felt and the other two nearly so from the outside. This creates three segments that can – more or less – collapse inward. The groove through the felt has a flexible material filling the slot, presumably to prevent the oil from leaking away out through the ends. Also visible is the small peg on the bush that mates with a slot in the housing and prevents it from spinning. Inside the housing is an annular groove that allows the oil to get from the drip oilier at top of the pillow block (via the hole) around the outside of the bronze to the felt at the bottom.

    -Doug
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails dscn0629.jpg   dscn0673.jpg   dscn0674.jpg   dscn0660.jpg   dscn0684.jpg  


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  7. #46
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    Default 1945-46 Brown & Sharpe No.1 Universal grinder #5426

    Now on to the spindle proper. First picture shows it in its minimal essentials. THE SHAFT. The enlarged view at the top shows a close up view of the left hand journal. Dimensionally it does not show much evidence of wear, but visually some lines can be seen. Will try a little polishing on this to see if it cannot be improved. If that gets nowhere, there is the possibility of giving it a very light lick on an identical B&S #1 Universal in the neighborhood.

    First thing that gets installed is the pulley flange. This is slipped on from the left and screws on till it abuts the small shoulder on the spindle (second picture.) Presumably there are different sized flanges to suit the different pulleys mentioned in the handbook. We only have the one pulley set, so don’t know for certain. If the shaft to the left of the flange looks tapered, that is not an optical illusion, it does have a slight taper for the pulley. The pulley proper is taper mounted so that it will run true. Unscrewing the flange just mentioned will push the pulley off its taper, and so serves as an extractor. Two holes in the face of the flange are for a peg spanner provided in the toolkit.

    In the third picture the pulley is installed and the bearing block is slipped on the right hand end. The cap and nut that control the end-float of the shaft is in place. This view also happens to show how far one has to dismantle the spindle to change the wheel. The right-hand bearing and its end float adjustment can be left undisturbed, but everything to the left of where the 1/2” wide wheel mounts as indicated by numeral 1 has to be removed. Next comes the wheel flange (#2), which is keyed. The wheel nut, #3. The pulley nut, #4, with a collar to protrude over the end of the bearing block. The left-hand bearing block, #5. The right-hand wheel hub and nut is indicated by #6. By rights, this should only be installed when it is being used. There should be a protective sleeve installed over the thread and taper when not using the hub. Don’t have this and will have to make a facsimile.

    The pulley and stone can be removed as a unit without disturbing the mounting of the stone. However you still have to dismantle the left side of the spindle and in addition use the threaded pulley flange to push the pulley off its mounting taper. I suppose in this manner several different grades of stones can be kept mounted and ready, without the expense of keeping several entire spindle assemblies on hand (verses the smaller expense of keeping several spare pulleys). However, since one will probably have to dress and true the wheel anyway, about the only savings in leaving the wheel mounted is avoiding rebalancing the wheel.

    The left hand bearing is allowed to float on the shaft a little bit, and axial end float control is via the right-hand bearing. With assembly tolerances of the spindle and the spindle clamps, there would be the potential of an exposed gap alongside the bearing that coolant and grit could enter. So the nut for the pulley has an extended collar that extends over this gap to provide some shielding. This can be seen in the fourth picture, with the bearing block pulled away slightly.

    The spindle was polished a slight amount to remove the lines in the left-hand journal and the bronze bearing closed up to suit. The last picture shows the spindle and bearings mounted in the lathe to help bed in the new oil felts.

    -Doug
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails dscn0651.jpg   dscn0652.jpg   dscn0672.jpg   dscn0703.jpg   dscn0698.jpg  


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  9. #47
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    Default 1945-46 Brown & Sharpe No.1 Universal grinder #5426

    We will get back to the spindle in a bit. Mounting a new stone and rebuilding the drip oiliers; the excitement is palpable!

    Meanwhile a set of original belt guards for the headstock were borrowed and replicas made. The first picture shows the original mounted on the headstock, with the replica laying below. The belt on this end drives the headstock spindle.

    The next picture shows a 'enhancement' to the replica guard. The original is hard up against the oil cup, so a dimple was made just to allow a little more clearance. Just a small refinement to have bragging rights over other #1 B&S Universals!

    Picture three shows the back of the headstock with the guard removed. Here can be seen the bracket the guard clips on and is suspended from. The ends have loops that capture tabs on the guard. Undoubtedly the headstock will be described further in excruciating detail but a little summary now will be inflicted. The motor sits on the vacant platform and drives the shaft at the top of the headstock via the flat belt that can just be glimpsed through the opening at the end of the platform. The upright lever operates a clutch/brake on this shaft. The pulley at the top drives the headstock via another flat belt to the pulley at the bottom. The small pulley is a tensioner.

    Picture four. This is the other end of the headstock, facing the work area. Here the guard is held on simply by two cheese head screws. There is another flat belt at this end too. It also is driven off the shaft across the top of the headstock. So, two flat belts driving the work head, what gives? The belt on the right (rear of the work head) drives the spindle. This is used when grinding with a chuck, face plate, or a live center. When grinding on a dead center (which was considered more accurate), the belt on the left is used. The spindle is locked prevented from rotating by a pin plunger. The belt only drives a pulley surrounding the dead center. The pulley is there solely to drive the work piece via a dog (same idea as a lathe dog).

    But I digress; this was to be about belt guards. Last picture show the original and the replicas laid out. Some Neanderthal has cut a notch in the one original guard (lower right). The replica for it (upper right) still needs a little more work. Notches cut in the mounting ears for the screws and the notch towards the spindle needs to be finished by enlarging it to final size and cutting a nice radius like the original has.

    -Doug
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails dscn5658.jpg   dscn5661.jpg   dscn5665.jpg   dscn5664.jpg   dscn5669.jpg  


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  11. #48
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    Default 1945-46 Brown & Sharpe No.1 Universal grinder #5426

    Two more views of the headstock on the #1; now from the back side. This different from the #2-4 in that the base retained the vintage round shape. A mouse had managed to get in via the aperture around the motor shaft, climbed up the internal belt cavity, through a core hole into the main housing, squeezed down past the sleeve for the spindle, and had a bomb proof larder in the base of the casting.

    Third picture is a close-up of the curious folded clip that retains the tab on the rear belt guard.

    Top cover off and the countershaft with the clutch and brake is revealed (forth picture). The circular hole patterns and pins are for the clutch and brake adjustment. These seem rather elaborate. The thrust faces for the shifting fork are simple threaded collars with pinch clamps. Two more of these would have sufficed for the clutch and bake adjustment, one would have thought. The green thing is the drive belt from the motor.

    Fifth picture. With the countershaft out, the fork to shift between clutch and brake (center is neutral) can be seen. The machined saddles at each ends are for the flanged bearing housings.

    -Doug
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails dscn5672.jpg   dscn5673.jpg   dscn5675.jpg   dscn5676.jpg   dscn5678.jpg  


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  13. #49
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    Default 1945-46 Brown & Sharpe No.1 Universal grinder #5426

    The work head casting are cleaned up and ready for a check over and a slap from the paint brush. The cover is stamped with a match mark (second picture), as is the work head.

    Third picture shows the main work head spindle. The primary bearing surface is a continuous taper, relived in the center. There are corresponding tapered bronze bearings in the headstock.

    At the rear of the main spindle (fourth picture) there is a housing containing a ball bearing. This seems to be a supplemental support to counteract the tension of the belt. No such supplemental support is provided for the front belt. However since that was used only to drive the work (via a dog) for dead center work, perhaps it was deemed a locked work spindle did not need the support. This photos is obviously out of sequence, being before the parts were cleaned up. This bearing was knackered and needed replacing. It receives oil that leaks out of the bronze bearing at the tail end of the work spindle.

    The fifth picture is the other end of the work spindle. It is pulled out a little to show the floating thrust washer that is interposed between the shoulder of the spindle and the face of the bronze bushing. There is no means of adjusting the bearing readily. The thrust washer has to be ground to the correct thickness to allow the shaft to sit into the taper just the desired amount. The inside surfaces of the bronze was coated with old varnished and burnt oil, indicating oiling was only done on February 29th. The oil cups are on the backside of the work head; out of sight and out of mind. However it cleaned up just fine. The shaft had a little bit of marking, but polished up. The shaft was checked in the bronze with and without the thrust washer and revealed that the thrust washer needed to be ground thinner by four thou. A half thou on the diameter was allowed for the oil film.

    -Doug
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails dscn5684.jpg   dscn5688.jpg   dscn5683.jpg   dscn5679.jpg   dscn5696.jpg  


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  15. #50
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    Default 1945-46 Brown & Sharpe No.1 Universal grinder #5426

    The first picture shows the counter shaft removed from the work head. The large pulley is the drive from the motor. The tapers on each end are for the smaller pulleys to the work head spindle. The one to the right drives the work spindle, the one to the left drives the dog plate that idles on the nose of the spindle when the spindle is locked (dead center). The flanged housings at each end contain ball bearings. These felt very lumpy, but flushing out with brake cleaner and re-oiling seems to have restored them. Which is fortunate as stripping down the countershaft and the brakes and clutch pack looks like a bother. Everything has to press off the tail end of the shaft, due to a shoulder at the opposite end. In other words the first bearing is easy to remove, but to get to the other bearing everything else on the shaft has to be pressed off.

    There does not seem to be any means to adjust the end float of the shaft. There were no shims between the bearing housings and the worked casting, but there might be on the shaft. Otherwise it must be that B&S were very careful to machine all the components with just the right assembly tolerance! Some clearance is needed, but too much end float would upset the brake and clutch settings. The fact that this countershaft runs faster than the work spindle and needs to take the end thrust of the brake and clutch actuation is likely why they used a ball bearing at each end.
    Second picture shows the belt tensioners. These are in essence cam followers, though made by B&S. Inside the housing are double row ball bearing units. These are all uniformly bad and will need replacing, and probably last saw lubrication when B&S assembled them.

    Last picture for now, with the work head parked on the machine. Slowly getting there! Also clever folk will note the wheel spindle and tailstock have magically advanced along in progress. Will get back to them in future. Meanwhile I need to take a break as scribe and read my latest issue of Techno-Rag least my subscription be revoked.

    -Doug
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails dscn5689.jpg   dscn5709.jpg   dscn5697.jpg  
    Last edited by Elam Works; 11-15-2017 at 09:39 AM.

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  17. #51
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    Default 1945-46 Brown & Sharpe No.1 Universal grinder #5426

    Work head continued. First picture is of the dead center drive pulley assembly. This threads onto the nose of the spindle, and while the spindle is locked this pulley can spin freely upon it to propel the work dog. The post sticking up is what drives the tail of the dog, and it pivots to facilitate the different sizes of dogs. The pulley is the largest diameter at the bottom; flat belt drive with a slight crown. The radial screw seen at the seven o’clock position locks the pulley to the outer sleeve of the hub.

    Next picture shows the pulley removed. Note how the pulley is core out to save material. On the right is the sleeve and hub, which with the larger pulley removed, reveals the smallest pulley in the range. The smallest pulley is the outer sleeve of the hub. There is an intermediate, slip on pulley as well, but we don’t have that. This small pulley (and the larger ones when slipped over) rotate on a plain bearing around the hub proper. This carries the drive post around, only the threaded portion seen in the center remains stationary with the spindle (and dead center). No problems here other than the swiveling quadrant that holds the post for the dog was a bit chewed up where bitten by the locking screw; which was missing and needed to be made.

    Third picture shows it back on the head stock, motor and internal belt up to the countershaft installed. The motor only needed an oil cup replacing and runs as smooth as a sewing machine. Probably not surprising as it was manufactured by Diehl, a main supplier to – and then subsidiary – of the Singer Sewing Machine Co. The coolant pump motor is also Diehl, but the main spindle is a Westinghouse and the power feed is a two speed motor by Master Electric Co. All are almost certainly original to the machine.
    The rear splash guard were missing, so originals were borrowed and replicas made. Four and five are pictures before and after in-situ. They are a mirrored pair as there is one on each rear corner. They have to be removed when the compound is set at anything other than ninety degrees.

    -Doug
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails dscn5730.jpg   dscn5731.jpg   dscn5813.jpg   dscn5775.jpg   dscn5806.jpg  


  18. #52
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    Default 1945-46 Brown & Sharpe No.1 Universal grinder #5426

    Now back to the wheel head. With the bearing felts bedded in, it was just a matter of dropping the spindle into the wheel head saddles (first picture). At the left hand end of the spindle is a hub for an optional stone, up to five inch diameter permitted. When not in use the taper and tread gets covered by a ‘hubcap’. I know I promised that this would get made, but due to issues beyond the power of this scribe, it did not get done. I tried to shame the brother into it, but to no avail. Deduct five points… Instead, optional wheel hub with a spacer (to replace the missing wheel) was installed. In my mind this is sub-optimal as it just that much larger and more items to not be in balance. Oh well.

    Picture two shows the clamps to good advantage. Third picture shows the clamp raised so the spindle assembly can be lifted out. The knurled knobs have a clever feature in that if you push them forward a little the base flange will hook under a cavity in the clamp, holding it in the up position.

    Forth picture, and the compound is pretty much ready for the motor. The substantial horizontal post is for the wheel/belt guard that can pivot up and out of the way. Keen observers will note this photo was taken a little earlier than the last post as the top half of the work head has yet to be installed. Anyway, the spindle motor (see next picture) is the original. The Babbited steel shell bearings are the ones I mentioned a few posts back that were a little loose, though the motor runs smoothly. Did not find a source for new bearings of that type, and given the 3600 rpm and oil cup lube not sure if bronze bushings would be a good replacement. For now, it has been decided just to try it as is. If it is a problem we do have a more modern motor than can be dropped in place while the original is sorted out. The modern motor does not have the provenance of the original, so would like to retain it if possible.

    Fifth picture Rear view with the motor on, but not cinched down. The motor pulley we have is the larger one for the I.D. spindle head. It would frag the ten inch wheel installed! So need to make a pulley, paint the belt and wheel guard, and install the belt. Exciting developments for a future post! Also can be seen the two rea splash guard, nestled either side of the cross slide. As mentioned in the last post, if the cross slide is swiveled, the guard on that side has to be removed. They just sit in place, held only by gravity.

    -Doug
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails dscn5699.jpg   dscn5701.jpg   dscn5702.jpg   dscn5703.jpg   dscn5807.jpg  


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  20. #53
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    Default 1945-46 Brown & Sharpe No.1 Universal grinder #5426

    The wheel spindle is a plain bearing, and lubrication is critical. So drip sight glass oil cups are provided to ensure a constant and total loss supply of oil. The operator is expected to constantly monitor how hot the bearings are running. Even tightening the clamps too much holding the spindle is advised against!

    Three oil cups came with the machine in order to make two functional. Unfortunately two had cracked glasses for the oil reservoir. One has a single crack and one was in three pieces. I had the clever idea to try one of the thinner variants of Loctite. While I know it will not set up in the presence of oxygen, I thought it might cure in the tight interface of the crack. So the pieces were clamped up in a collet (with release paper to keep it from sticking) to hold it cylindrical and tight. However after several days it had not even attempted to setup. So plan B was to use the adhesive to stick the rear view mirror to windshields. This worked fine (second picture), but then reading the instructions it seems this adhesive is a isocyanate or ‘super glue’ and I believe that stuff degrades in the presence of fluids. In any event it really was too viscous, and part of the fix for the glass with the single crack was relying to some extent on capillary action. I felt at most the crack could only be expanded a few thou safely to clean and introduce the glue. So on to plan C, buy some polycarbonate tubing and make new ‘glasses’. This was a bit of a waste as the shortest length of tubing available was eight foot and two inches was required. At least it was cheap. Afterward, I found that replacement glass can be had on eBay for the folks restoring hit & miss engines. The polycarbonate was still cheaper, even with the shipping. Gave some tubing to a friend so he had a lifetime supply to repair his oil glasses.

    Also noted (too ate) that the same suppliers sold the flat cork washers used to seal the ends of the glass tubing. Generally we get stuff like that from McMaster-Carr, but they don’t have them anymore (or leather cup washers). So low durometer O-rings were used instead. Results with a cheap-o polish with the Scotbrite pad in picture three.

    Since I have two photo spots left in this post, a quick mention of the tailstock. This got disassembled and partially re-assembled before I even notices. So the forth picture shows the quill already reinstalled. It did not require anything other than a cleaning up. The joints around the split clamp (clamp for the quill) are filled with the same stiff, but flexible material that the slots in the spindle bearings are. (Fourth picture) Probably a very hard felt, pointed out by the red arrows. In this case allows the joint to move yet keeps the grit out. Of all the things that had gone missing over the years, the little wooden handled paint brush for the white lead pot is still in place.

    Fifth picture shows the front side of the tailstock, now all assembled but yet to be painted. The prominent clamping lever at the nose is to hold the axillary diamond dresser. That will be seen in a future post. The nose housing that mounts it also provides the cavity for the felt that wipes the quill.

    -Doug
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails dscn5712.jpg   dscn5713.jpg   dscn5717.jpg   dscn0693.jpg   dscn0697.jpg  


  21. #54
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    Default 1945-46 Brown & Sharpe No.1 Universal grinder #5426

    Just a fill in post before getting into coolant guard production.

    As promised, the picture of the tailstock with the diamond dresser mount installed. This was another item that had gotten mislaid, so borrowed the one from the 1947 #1 to make a copy.

    Picture two. Belt installed on the table and cross feed drive. This is a J series poly-vee belt. Running it directly on the crowned surface of the pulleys, and will see how it holds up. Only had one original flat belt with the machine (work head) so pretty much all the belts needed to replaced. Could have had canvas flat belts made to order, but the poly-vee belts are cheap and readily available.

    Powered up the machine and ran the table feed for a while, all worked smoothly. Still some issues with the cross feed, I think the part behind the hand wheel with the counterweight needs to pivot more freely. The table drive is a two-speed motor, and there is a fair amount of reduction by the time it gets to the table!

    The main spindle motor is wired up too, but as yet no pulley or belt installed. The work head motor has been run, but a receptacle needs to be installed so it can be plugged/unplugged from the base. Originally it was wired in directly, but that wire had been cut when the machine was dismantled and a plug is a good idea if the work head is removed to use the universal work holder in its place. We don't have the B&S universal work holder, and I already have a Monoset grinder for tool grinding, but best to be prepared if the occasion ever arises. Beside it provides a convenient place to splice the connection. The wire disappear into the back of the lower base behind the electrical board. No overwhelming desire to pull that out and upset the little demon named Watt that lives back in there and spins all the motors. When he gets mad he vanishes in a puff of smoke and electrical things stop working!

    Third picture. Here she is as of yesterday. Coming along, but still a lot of small details to attend to.

    Forth picture shows the cupboard is getting bare. Not too much left to install! The motor on the internal grinding spindle is a later owner modification. B&S had it driven from the same motor that drove the O.D. wheel.

    Back in a few day. Or a week. Or whenever...

    -Doug
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails dscn5817.jpg   dscn5815.jpg   dscn5827.jpg   dscn5789.jpg  

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  23. #55
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    Default 1945-46 Brown & Sharpe No.1 Universal grinder #5426

    One of the items that got lost along the way was/were the motor pulleys. There was a pulley, but quite large; larger than the pulley on the wheel spindle. The wheel motor is a 3600 rpm, so with that pulley the wheel would be spinning a merry 6800 rpm, comfortably exceeding the 2400 rpm limit of a ten inch by 1/2 inch stone. The large pulley was - of course - for the internal grinding spindle option. Fortunately the operator's manual does state what the interchangeable pulley diameters were. The smallest used for the ten inch wheel, and two slightly larger ones for when using a six inch wheel. It did have the advantage in using up some short offcuts of three and four inch bar stock. The sort of scrap you keep around for decades waiting for the right job to come along. Since I did not want to re-chuck it anymore than I had to, access to every surface but the counterbore was had by the expedient of welding the slug to a bit of rod for a sacrificial shank. This face would later be machined away forming the counterbore.

    Probably we would only ever need the smallest pulley, but while setup to turn the one, I decided might as well make all three. These were turned on a modern machine that we won't mention the name here, but it is synonymous with potmetal casting alloy in the UK... I do not want to say any verboten words like the "C" or the "A" word here least I be chastised!

    A blunder was almost made in that I started out using the pulley for the ID grinding attachment as a template for the hub dimensions. Something was not working out, and drew my attention to the fact that the belt line for the OD spindle and the ID spindle were not aligned. In hindsight, they did not have any reason to be since the internal grinder spindle is an entirely separate attachment. There was a slight offset between the two of about a quarter inch. #5704 to the rescue again and it provided the dimensions for the smallest pulley, which were extrapolated to the next two larger sizes.

    First picture shows the new pulleys. The adaptor for the motor and the pulley cap nut can be seen in the foreground. The the adaptor fits on the motor shaft with a parallel bore; and no shoulder to pull up against. So the adaptor is retained by a dog point set screw with a corresponding hole in the motor shaft. You have to take the pulley off to get to this (you can see the hole for it in the picture), but then normally the adaptor stays on the motor shaft. The taper worked out to just a little under 14 degrees included angle. It did not seem to work out to any other know taper standard that I could find. Not that that was a problem, as the traditional method was used of starting out small and adjusting the taper until it mated nicely.

    Then it was just a matter of broaching the keyway. Slight complication for being on an angle, but that just meant a tapered bush needed to be made (second picture). A tapered wedge underneath to plumb it up and it was just like any other broaching job in the arbor press. Other than the economy broach was not keen on the total thickness of the part. But pushing it a little at a time and giving the broach time to spring back straight saw it through. The last pulley seemed to be a bit of 1045 steel (it was in the unmarked pile of scrap), as the difference in turning and broaching were noticeable.

    The nut side has a recess (third picture). It is not known if the two larger pulleys originally had any addition work on them to reduce the weight, as neither #5426 or #5704 have them present. The 6-3/8 inch pulley for the ID attachment is cast in a thin section, and actually weighs less than the largest solid pulley (3-13/32 inch at the crown).

    Last picture is of a chart that was presumably supplied with the machine. Not sure if this picture is from the internet or in the collection of stuff with #5704; the owner is having a look. It basically duplicates information in several separate charts in the operator's manual.

    -Doug
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails dscn5894.jpg   dscn5941.jpg   dscn5945.jpg   feeds-speeds-table.jpg  

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    Default 1945-46 Brown & Sharpe No.1 Universal grinder #5426

    #5426 came with a coolant pump and eighteen gallon tank (very heavy!) At first the idea was to make a smaller tank that would take up less space, but I think experience with our surface grinder that has a minimal amount of coolant in circulation showed that use and evaporation played too much havoc with the concentration. A greater volume helps moderate the variations. The tank nestles in the rear corner of the machine (see first picture) and we will put it on castors (which was an original option). I am not sure what coolant options were available in the mid-forties. A handbook from the 1029s mentions the use of water with the addition of Sal-Soda to inhibit rusting. But by the 1940 edition, the word "coolant" is definitely in use, with no other elaboration than to use any "...of the better grades of commercial coolant compounds added to water should prove satisfactory as a coolant."

    The pump itself is a standard centrifugal type (second and third picture). B&S sold a line of vane and gear type pumps in their catalog that could be purchased separately from the machinery, and this is the #206 with the addition of a clamp on collar to suspend it from the corner of the coolant tank.

    The pump needed little attention other than a check over and a re-wrap of the insulation on the field leads. And a lick of paint. Like the work head motor, it was supplied by Deihl Mfg. Co. (Singer Sewing Machine). See forth picture.

    Last picture shows a base made for the grinder. Any of the small machines we like to have on a base of sorts to make it easier to move around with a pallet jack. The rear leg is detachable so as not to interfere with the coolant tank or anything else that will be stored around the machine.

    Next time will be more wet and wild coolant related topics with new splash guards being manufactured, and a problem that had come to light with unreliable cross feed.

    -Doug
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 1944-coolant-arrangment.jpg   dscn5871.jpg   dscn5866.jpg   dscn5878.jpg   dscn5961.jpg  


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