26" F.Barnes CO. Rockford Ill. - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by swatkins View Post
    The column has also been repaired with what looks like a very professional welding repair.
    YUP. No peening marks, so it was done with the whole thing hot. That's why there's no spackle under the paint. Nice machine.

  2. #22
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    Started working on the old girl today.. I've been planning and stress relieving a lot of straight edges lately so my mind has been on cast iron and thinking of repairing the cast iron table on the drill press.

    I'm torn on how to repair the top, it is a mess with holes all over the thing and not even flat enough to work on right now. The flatness I can take care of with a ride on the planer, the holes are a different matter.

    Here is a picture of the table as I found it.. 20170510_223049-1-.jpg

    Here is a short video of the table after it was cleaned up.




    After watching the cast iron welding repairs on the big radial arm drill that was dropped I'm thinking a little welding might be in order before the top takes it's planer ride...

  3. #23
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    As far as your motor/VFD size and torque, I have a 13x36" lathe that I retrofitted 3hp 3ph with VFD onto. The previous owner had (I'm assuming) tried to remove the chuck with the spindle locked in back gear, and shredded the back gears pretty extensively. I bought it cheap, and I usually run it in the lowest non-back gear speed with the VFD turned down pretty far for threading. The motor torque exceeds the capability of the lathe to take a stiff cut when threading 1", so plenty of grunt I'd imagine for your drill. I don't like to turn a VFD down past about 10 hz. though, as some pulse can develop in the torque, torque decreases, and motor cooling suffers.

  4. #24
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    Related details for the Barnes Upright and Sliding Head Drills
    barnes-details-1908.jpgbarnes-feed.jpgbarnes-backgears-1908.jpg1906-barnes-sliding-head.jpg1906-feed-barnes-sliding-head-drill.jpg
    John

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  6. #25
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    swatkins,

    In your video you asked whether to leave your drill pillar painted. It would not have been painted originally, but an oiled, machined surface. You don't need to spin it in a lathe though. I would wind the table to the top then remove the paint below the collar with paint stripper. Any rust remaining could be removed with emery tape, though if that seems too harsh, try some scotchbrite. Once that section is clean, wind the table well down, seal (e.g. masking tape) around the top of the table collar and clean up the top portion of the pillar.

    BTW, the full name cast into the drill is probably W.F & John Barnes Co.

  7. #26
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    I was wondering if you might be able to find a suitable sized old lathe face plate in good condition and make a hub adapter to fit the table clamp on your drill press ?
    It might save you a lot of work and if you can find something that has an unpopular thread or other suitable spindle mount you might be able to get it for a lower price.
    Regards ,
    Jim

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  9. #27
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    My 20" champion's table was significantly worse on the drill holes, atop being cast with the slaggiest iron I've seen.

    Happened upon a 2" thick plate burnout slightly larger than the table, drilled and tapped about 60 3/4-10 holes through it on a grid pattern and bolted it down flat.
    Looking back I wish I'd have just cut two perpendicular T-slots instead. Used the drill to push the tap through (3ph reversing is really nice) and snapped the square off the tap a couple times as it got dull. Sharpened and ground a new one on.

    ETA: welding up the holes, you aren't going to get it flat afterwords unless it's ground

  10. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Christie View Post
    I was wondering if you might be able to find a suitable sized old lathe face plate in good condition and make a hub adapter to fit the table clamp on your drill press ?
    It might save you a lot of work and if you can find something that has an unpopular thread or other suitable spindle mount you might be able to get it for a lower price.
    Regards ,
    Jim
    That is a great idea and one I'm pursuing now!

  11. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by [486] View Post

    ETA: welding up the holes, you aren't going to get it flat afterwords unless it's ground
    I was thinking that the welding material would be soft enough to plane off nicely as it's going for a ride on the planner.

  12. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by swatkins View Post
    I was thinking that the welding material would be soft enough to plane off nicely as it's going for a ride on the planner.
    Maybe if you can anneal/normalize it in that oven it'd take care of the hard spots from welding, or using more expensive filler than Brian did on his drill, like Ni99 or bronze

  13. #31
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    If you were to continue working on getting the rest of the drill working maybe by the time you have that finished and running perhaps a suitable piece to make the table with will have turned up .
    If not you could attach a piece of steel or cast Iron plate to the top of the old table and use it until something better came a long or do the weld repair you were thinking of.
    I know the tables on most of those old drills are in bad shape but there is always a chance that there is another old one where the table is good and the rest is scrap .
    I often find that the used part or piece of material I may have been looking for turns up after I have given up and repaired the one I had or bought something new.
    Regards,
    Jim

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  15. #32
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    I can verify that the column was not painted originally. The portion that the table mount travels along should be bright metal. Probably whoever was uninformed enough to paint that surface was uninformed enough to do a poor prep job, so the paint might be over old oil and come off relatively easy. I would try scraping it first to see how adhered it really is. If it is well stuck I used aircraft stripper (available from Sherwin Williams) to good effect on my drill, but wear your PPE as it is nasty stuff. If you lay the drill down there are bolts on the bottom of the column that will release base from column, then the table support can come off for cleaning.

    After paint is removed I had good luck with 3M abrasive pads (like a scotch-brite pad you use by hand) to get the rust off without removing any metal. Keeps the original tooling marks from when it was turned. If there is any bad rust a strip of emery cloth will work well also.

    On the table, I went through the same thought process as you currently are. I looked at buying a cast iron disc plus cylinder of the right size from McMaster and machining and brazing together but it was too expensive. I looked at the Cast iron scrap heap at my local scrap yard many times to see if there was a heavy flywheel or brake plate that would work. Yours looks like it could be brazed up decently if heated on a forge fire and allowed to cool on the same, then resurfaced. But it will always show.

    In the end it comes down to what level of restoration you are trying to attain. I use my press mainly for woodworking and installed a custom wood table over the shamed metal original. Once I didn't have to look at it, it didn't bother me nearly as much

  16. #33
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    I want to restore it so it can be safely used and that means I need the slots. After thinking about installing a lathe plate on it I'm sure T-Slots would be even better for hold downs and a lot easier to use.

    I can always put it on the planner, make it flat and just use it but there are tons of holes for oil and chips to collect in and soon it would be back to the shape it was in before I sandblasted it.

    A wood cover does not let me use the slots as effectively and I would always know what was under it

    I can put a 1/2 plate on it, and mill the slots, but if I have to buy that material and perform the milling it would be just as cheap and probably be less work to find a used face plate with T-Slots.

    I called my friend with the large lathes. Said he never used face plates and had none but I might check with the large machine used dealer, here in Navasota. They might have something not yet thrown in the scrap melting pot.


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