Delta/Rockwell table saw cross slide thread size
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    Default Delta/Rockwell table saw cross slide thread size

    I have a Delta/Rockwell 10” Unisaw, which I bought used over forty years ago. I would like to know more about the cross-slide... specifically, what thread size are the five holes in the ¾” steel slide? Moreover, what is the thread size of the post that fits into the cross-slide head? They are not what one would find in the hardware store. Please see the attached photo for reference.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 2017-06-18-16.19.42.jpg  

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    Default

    It's a miter gauge, not a cross slide!

    But besides that, it's a pretty old configuration. My 1985ish Unisaw miter gauge only has one hole, near the front. It's threaded 1/4-28, as is the locking handle. I suspect yours is the same. Delta didn't change things very often.

    if you don't have one of these, you should!

    Nut & Bolt Thread Checker (Inch & Metric) - Tap And Die Sets - Amazon.com

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    Default 3/8 National Extra Fine

    I don't have my old Delta miter gauge in front of me, but IIRC the large hole for the handle or, alternately, the hold-down, is a 3/8-32 thread in the National Extra Fine series.

    CORRECTION: IGNORE THIS! ORIGINAL POSTER AND OTHERS IDENTIFIED IT AS 1/2-20. SEE BELOW!

    JRR
    Last edited by SouthBendModel34; 06-19-2017 at 11:29 AM. Reason: Incorrect Recall

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    JRR,
    You may well be correct. Looking at the picture again, the four larger holes look to be about half the width of the 3/4" wide bar, while the one at the end is about one-third the width.

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    Default Thread Checker

    Quote Originally Posted by wawoodman View Post
    It's a miter gauge, not a cross slide!

    But besides that, it's a pretty old configuration. My 1985ish Unisaw miter gauge only has one hole, near the front. It's threaded 1/4-28, as is the locking handle. I suspect yours is the same. Delta didn't change things very often.

    if you don't have one of these, you should!

    Nut & Bolt Thread Checker (Inch & Metric) - Tap And Die Sets - Amazon.com
    wawoodman,

    Thanks for the reply. Sorry about my terminology. I will correct that in the future. The small holes in the 3/4" miter gauge are not 1/4-28. I checked at my local hardware store and on my thread checker in my shop. The large hole in the miter gauge head appears to be 1/2" fine... either 14, 16, 18, 20, 24, 27, 28, or 32. I thank you for your response though.

    Drew

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    Default Follow up

    Quote Originally Posted by SouthBendModel34 View Post
    I don't have my old Delta miter gauge in front of me, but IIRC the large hole for the handle or, alternately, the hold-down, is a 3/8-32 thread in the National Extra Fine series.

    JRR
    SouthBendModel34,


    Thank you for your reply. Regarding the hold-down, I am able to screw a 1/2-13 part way down... enough to know that the hole is definitely 1/2 inch. I just don't know what pitch it is. I tested all of the bolts in the hardware store and could not find a match. I will go to a local nut and bolt supplier in Miami to see what they recommend. Also, the holes in the 3/4 inch miter slide are counter sunk, so they look like they are different sizes as wawoodman suggested, but they are all the same.

    Miami Welding | Miami Welders | MitchellsMiami.com | Miami Welding Machine Fasters

    Otherwise, I will just drill and tap to suit. Thank you all for your help.

    Regards,

    Drew

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    On my 1970s vintage Rockwell Delta builders saw the large hole in the top of the miter gauge casting is 1/2-20 and the two smaller holes are 1/4-28, as is the hole at the end of the aluminum bar.

    I suspect yours are the same but have been damaged by someone trying to force the wrong size in.

    Probably the reason my bar has one hole rather than two is because it has a shorter bar.

    Edit: looking at your photo your miter gauge does not have the two outer holes, just the large one for the post on the optional holddown.

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    If you intend to use that thing then get the 34-568 clamp attachment. My bar does not have the three holes starting from the top, only the two at the end. The bottom most hole is for the guide washer if your table has T-slots. The second hole from the bottom is for one of the posts of the 34-568 attachment.

    In my experience the stock miter gauge is only good for rough framing carpentry. Get a Accu-Mitter for precision work and you will never look back. Another good thing to get is the 34-172 tenoning attachment.

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    Default

    I posted this link in another thread .
    http://www.sawcenter.com/unisawparts.htm
    I found it here.
    Delta Manufacturing Co. - History | VintageMachinery.org
    Maybe you can find more info. there .
    Jim

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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Scottl View Post
    On my 1970s vintage Rockwell Delta builders saw the large hole in the top of the miter gauge casting is 1/2-20 and the two smaller holes are 1/4-28, as is the hole at the end of the aluminum bar.

    I suspect yours are the same but have been damaged by someone trying to force the wrong size in.

    Probably the reason my bar has one hole rather than two is because it has a shorter bar.

    Edit: looking at your photo your miter gauge does not have the two outer holes, just the large one for the post on the optional holddown.
    Thank you Scottl,

    With this information, I can try again, but I will still need to visit my local nut and bolt supplier, as my local ACE hardware does not carry 1/2-20 bolts. Thank you for that.

    NOTE!! I would also like to thank Jim Christie and Rons for their valuable input.

    Kind regards,

    Drew

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    Quote Originally Posted by pak View Post
    Thank you Scottl,

    With this information, I can try again, but I will still need to visit my local nut and bolt supplier, as my local ACE hardware does not carry 1/2-20 bolts. Thank you for that.
    You touch upon a issue that has infected my location. The good hardware stores used to have all sorts of fasteners of all sizes and threads. No more, actually no more stores. The big boxers have acquired them and removed all that kind on inventory. The inventory is now all imported iron with only the most common sizes. More for the house wife with a weekend project, like hanging a picture. Times are sure changing, but screw that. I just go to the industrial supply places.

    Off the shelf now means off the boat.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rons View Post
    You touch upon a issue that has infected my location. The good hardware stores used to have all sorts of fasteners of all sizes and threads. No more, actually no more stores. The big boxers have acquired them and removed all that kind on inventory. The inventory is now all imported iron with only the most common sizes. More for the house wife with a weekend project, like hanging a picture. Times are sure changing, but screw that. I just go to the industrial supply places.

    Off the shelf now means off the boat.
    It's part of the general trend of hardware stores turning into what I call hardware boutiques where there are more decorative items than actual hardware. I've had to drive further to visit actual hardware stores and even then I might have to visit 2 or more plus auto parts stores to find what used to be common sizes of fasteners. Thank god for McMaster-Carr. If they ever go out of business I'll start referring to the time period after as the Post-apocalyptic era.

    One thing I am in the habit of when I do locate hard to find fasteners locally is buy a few extra to keep on hand, often in different lengths that could be cut down if needed.

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    Default The Orange Borg - Resistance is Futile! You will be Assimilated !

    There's a firm which supplies hardware stores with racks of divided drawers containing unusual fasteners. I can't remember the name right now, but you've seen them. That's where to look for 1/2-20 NF.

    Another place you might find a 1/2-20 thread is the head bolt or manifold bolt of an older American car.

    With apologies to Star Trek, The Next Generation, there's a huge orange Borg travelling around, assimilating all the small hardware stores.
    Just like the TNG Borg, "Resistance is Futile! You will be Assimilated!"

    Newcomers to this board may not have noticed the "Sticky Thread" up at the top of the forum, where we try to list the few remaining great hardware emporiums.

    Cherish your small stores. Buy whatever you can from them, even seasonal things that are cheaper at The Big Box. (Just knocking off the lawn care sales is enough to put some small shops in the red.)

    Oh, sure! You can buy all your stuff over the internet, maybe even from a supplier which is heavily into robotics to pick, pack, and ship! If you do, don't be surprised that the main street of your town becomes a series of empty storefronts, and your kids can't find summer jobs.

    I grew up in a suburban town of about 18,000 population. There were 5 hardware and paint stores plus a lumberyard within walking distance of my boyhood home. Each one had a unique stock which reflected the experience and opinions of their proprietors. If one of them did not have what I wanted, then likely one of the others would! That town is down to one paint store, one hardware store, and the lumberyard. Since the Orange Borg has opened up in the two adjacent towns, I fear for their future.

    On second edit: If you want to stock up, all sorts of odd lots of fasteners can be found at Flea Markets and auctions. Be judicious!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Scottl View Post
    It's part of the general trend of hardware stores turning into what I call hardware boutiques where there are more decorative items than actual hardware. I've had to drive further to visit actual hardware stores and even then I might have to visit 2 or more plus auto parts stores to find what used to be common sizes of fasteners. Thank god for McMaster-Carr. If they ever go out of business I'll start referring to the time period after as the Post-apocalyptic era.

    One thing I am in the habit of when I do locate hard to find fasteners locally is buy a few extra to keep on hand, often in different lengths that could be cut down if needed.
    I did something more drastic than this. I bought up surplus quantities of fasteners at a local outlet that sells electronic, whats the right word, junk. A bag that might cost $20 is $1. Not bragging, just had to do it. Sure saves time but it takes up quite a few AkroBin boxes.

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    Default

    For special threads a lathe is a very useful tool. Even if I can buy a fastener locally, or from McMaster Carr-comes next day, I often just cut the threads off a longer bolt and re thread it in the lathe to the thread I need. It is often faster than going to the hardware store even though I can get to one in about 20 min. That equals 40 min. driving and at least 10 min in the store and a few minutes getting my keys and wallet together. Even my plane change gear lathe I can setup and cut a thread quicker than that I and often I can get a better fit than a "store bought" one. But you do have to know what thread to cut.

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    Default Spot on Scottl

    Quote Originally Posted by Scottl View Post
    On my 1970s vintage Rockwell Delta builders saw the large hole in the top of the miter gauge casting is 1/2-20 and the two smaller holes are 1/4-28, as is the hole at the end of the aluminum bar.

    I suspect yours are the same but have been damaged by someone trying to force the wrong size in.

    Probably the reason my bar has one hole rather than two is because it has a shorter bar.

    Edit: looking at your photo your miter gauge does not have the two outer holes, just the large one for the post on the optional hold down.
    You were absolutely right about the sizes and the fact that the small holes were bunged up. I took my miter gauge to my local nut and bolt supplier and the miter gauge casting was 1/2-20 and the small holes were 1/4-28. He supplied the larger bolt, but I had to buy a 1/4-28 tap to clean up the holes. It worked out just fine. Thank you very much.

    Regards,

    Drew

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    I agree with the social commentary but the orange monster that ate your hadware store is showing a moderate amount of 1/2-20 fasteners.

    Sent from my SM-G900V using Tapatalk


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