Ice cream maker rebuild - Page 4
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  1. #61
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    Update on the rebuilt Country Freezer gear head.

    We've made a whole lot of ice cream and it's done quite well up until the last batch.
    After every couple batches I remove the gear cover and gears to smear a little fresh grease on the bushings and gear teeth, and I'd just done that 2 batches ago.

    Pictures attached.
    The two main gears pilot one in the other stainless steel on stainless steel and they galled quite a lot. This was never perfect and I tried to keep grease in there but apparently not enough or not right kind.

    img_2053.jpgimg_2049.jpgimg_2047.jpg

    Part of the solution will be an oilite bushing in the smaller gear and clean the spigot some on the other.

    Also notice that the gear tooth contact areas are galling too.
    I've tried two different brands of food safe grease and neither seem to do much good.
    I'm ready to use a real grease that is effective and not necessarily "food safe".

    Any thoughts or recommendations about the problem or solution?

    Grigg

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    Bored the one gear to fit a bushing, already had the bushing just needed to shorten and reduce flange diameter.
    The gear with the spigot was filed and stoned smooth as that diameter was already worn a hair smaller than desirable for the bushing on hand. The face beside spigot I later took a skim cut to clean up after checking assembled height of the gear set.

    img_2055.jpg

    Now to pick a grease and reassemble, then make some ice cream over the weekend.

    Grigg

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  4. #63
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    So far so good on the repair.
    img_2056.jpg

    Ended up using a red high temp grease because it's what I had.
    Still interested in opinions and better ideas on suitable grease for slow speed stainless steel gears.

    We've made I think 4 batches in the last couple weeks.



    Grigg

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  6. #64
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    Seems I didn't have enough fun the first go around rebuilding one of these.
    Actually 5 gallons at a time isn't always enough any more so I'm going to make a new pair of longer frame rails and double up.

    This time however I won't be rebuilding a brand new gear head. Instead I bought the raw castings and can start from that. Though not quite enough metal on them where it matters so making bushings as before.

    img_2183.jpg

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  8. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grigg View Post
    Actually 5 gallons at a time isn't always enough any more so I'm going to make a new pair of longer frame rails and double up.
    Grigg -

    You are falling into the same trap my Dad did in the late 50s. Now if it was a Mills 10 Gallon machine I'd have to scratch my head and come and help run it! Nice step up from the 5 gallon model.

    I'll have to try and remember to take a picture out in the shop tomorrow of some signs.

    Dale

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  10. #66
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    ...and now I'm hungry for some ice cream...."whitehouse" ice cream....

  11. #67
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    Default Flavors from the 50's

    Grigg -

    Think I have told before that my Dad's place had two 5 gallon Mill's machines to make ice cream, then about 1958 or so he came up with a 10 gallon machine and so got rid of the older 5 gallon one. All were bought used as far as I know - it was a very rare and major event to buy anything new. One has to remember that even back then the food business had the highest fatality rate of new start ups.

    At this time of the summer we would have between 30 and 35 flavors of hard ice cream available, plus soft vanilla and chocolate. A number of years ago my brother and I split up the left over signs that were still around. I have mine hung on the wall of my shop/garage - 14 foot ceiling in this part, hence the funny angle of picture. The large sundae was one of two that were on the roof of the building, one at each end - my brother has the other one. Only have 18 flavors, plus the sherbets. Off hand I can see that strawberry,cherry vanilla, butterscotch and black cherry are missing, plus some others that I might think of later. If my memory is right my brother sill has the recipe book - he actually made a lot more ice cream than I did. Starting the year I left for college (66) he made all the ice cream until he left, in 68. By then the business was tapering off some - Dad refused to compromise on quality and at that point people did not want to pay for good ice cream. The prices listed were, I think, what we were charging when I started dipping - at age 9 in 1958. I could barely get into the back of the cabinets and my hands were too small to hold 7 cones like I did later. At that time sundaes, sodas, root beer floats and milk shakes were 30 cents I believe, and banana splits 45 cents. My Dad was a real stickler for portion control - a dip was 3 ounces and it better not be under or over. We were expected to weigh a cone on a regular basis - and he could spot an over/under from 20 feet away. We also had to do all the addition mentally and be correct - we had no registers, adding machines or scratch pads - just two wooden cash tills. Plus you learned quick to always leave the bills on the window counter and hand the change over prior to putting it in the till - to prevent the 'look kid - I gave you a 20 not a 10'.

    Now I can look back at that as a great learning experience but at the time did my share of complaining that I was an abused kid having to work all those hours. Did not complain too much, though - the kids on the neighboring farms were working just as hard.

    And the spoon in the picture has no connection to the ice cream business - got the award as the 'pot stirrer' from the rest of the committee when we called our last pastor. They insisted I hang it there so I did.

    Dale

    ice-cream-1.jpgice-cream-2.jpg

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  13. #68
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    Thanks again Dale for the pictures and stories. The Mill's machines, were they wood tubs and ice, or more modern? What little I can find online about them I'm guessing old and similar design to the White Mountain but perhaps more robust?
    Here's an unusual one by George M Mills looks like dasher travels up and down Patent US314863 - Ice-cream freezer - Google Patents
    Company may have been Thomas Mills & Bro.


    I'm moving along on the upgrade, improvements, and rebuilding another gear head for our ice cream contraption.

    Most all the hardware and materials are in hand and already started on some brackets and little things.

    One item is the new/used wood tub came with a plastic bulkhead fitting siliconed in the bottom and other plastic valves and fittings. I don't care for that and will simplify and use brass/bronze stuff. The big hole at the bottom of the bucket was already sized to fit a 1" thru hull fitting as used on boats, so I found one, made a gasket, trimmed to length (not shown), and made an expanding rubber plug to seal it off real neat and tidy.
    To allow the fitting to sit flush made up a piloted sanding tool to spot face the curved wood inside and out.

    img_2207.jpg

    To accept the new ice cream maker the frame is growing to 7'-6" long and adding two new crossmembers. I like Micarta and decided to make all the crossmembers out of it and also revise the shapes a tad compared to the old ones.
    Hardest part of that so far is just moving the stuff, something like 250 lb of it. A friend came by last week to help get a piece out of the stack and last night to position on the Roll-In saw.
    Using a 3-4 pitch blade it cuts really nice. Get it set on the table and let the saw feed into it 6 or so inches at a time, turn it off, reset, and feed again. It staid put long enough to take the picture, otherwise two hands on it constantly adjusting for a straight cut. The roll in feature though not long enough travel was still really nice, better than hand feeding the whole thing.

    img_2210.jpg

    Grigg

  14. #69
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    Dale, I see you already explained about the Mills ice cream freezer being refrigerated back in post #60. I did find a catalog picture of one online but can't seem to find it again. Recently purchased a 1910 Mills catalog and it's quite interesting, lots of neat old ice cream stuff in there, and some ideas of things to make for my ice cream efforts.

    I've been steadily working away at remaking my ice cream contraption.
    The frame is all done. The old one was locust but we didn't have anything suitable and dry for the new longer frame. A friend had some Greenheart or Ipe salvaged form the Coney Island boardwalk that I picked up a couple weekends ago. It is tougher than woodpecker lips and finished up nicely.

    Made new stainless brackets for the milk can (radiator/cooling) and for the first jack shaft. Changed locations of things some for a neater fit and easier to work on stuff. Second shaft which powers the rear freezer is fit in bushings directly in the crossmembers. Also reworked the tensioners, 4 new bronze idlers, and made a new spring loaded over center tensioner for the rear freezer. Last night worked out all the belt lengths.

    Tomorrow a friend is coming over to help finish up things on the cart including axles and to set it on the ground.
    Next few evenings and weekend I have to finish machine work on the new gear housing.

    Everything thus far has taken longer than expected even though I expected it would and started extra early... Tuesday it has to be all done and working at 9:00.

    Pictures attached.

    Grigg

    img_2240.jpgimg_2241.jpgimg_2251.jpgimg_2257.jpg

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  16. #70
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    Lot of progress yesterday.
    About all that's left to do on the cart part is one keyseat in a shaft, bolt on front axle, and set it on the ground.
    The new gearhead for the second freezer is almost done machining, one more setup to bore the shaft hole and make two bushings. Then likely a lot of filing to correct gear tooth geometry enough they all fit in the housing.

    A few pictures of gear housing machine work, much like the first time earlier in the thread but a few differences explained here.

    First setup to drill and ream hinge holes. Prior to this I checked width outside those ears and there wasn't any material on one to clean up later, which was resolved by bending it to "add" some material.
    Also carefully measured the relationships of the shaft, hinge bosses, and bucket rim all set by the welded together hinge bracket.
    Decided where I wanted to later bore the shaft hole in the casting and added to that the offset to the hinge centerline.
    Other axis I worked from natural center of the gear housing which logically is center of the bucket. So from bucket radius (at inside top rim) subtracted hinge centerline offset(built into hinge bracket). This location as shown just doesn't work, not enough material on the casting hinge ears. Decided to shift 3/16" and later just mount the pivot point on bottom of bucket 3/16" offset as well.

    img_2260.jpg

    Earlier filled in the rough cast holes in cover, the manufacturer uses hex head bolts and I wanted countersunk bolts to provide a more positive location to help keep the gears centered.
    First drilled, tapped, and installed helicoils in gear housing.
    Second clamped cover in place and one at a time drilled 3/8" holes for bolts to supplement clamps. Then continuing around countersinking and fitting the 3/8" oval head Phillips screws to replace the bolts.
    This time unlike last time I could pick where the bolts went and use some logic. Worked out to look right on a 6.125" bolt circle with the two bolts offset 21° from centerline.

    img_2266.jpg

    More to come later.

  17. #71
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    The rest of the machine work on the gear housing was pretty much same as the first one. While set on the milling machine I bored the cover, turned spigot in center, and spot faceed around it. Machineed thrust surface for pinion, and outside width of hinge ears. Second setup on angle plate overhanging table to bore for pinion shaft. Plenty of material to bore right to size, instead fit a bushing for easy replacement in the future.
    Measuring inside and outside diameter to make thrust washer was again difficult but this time I found some little calipers to transfer the measurement.
    Worked real nice, I left a couple thousandths clearance at the OD and a light press or firm slip fit on the ID. Longer portion of spigot also turned for snug slip fit on an oilite bushing (gear turns on this stationary bushing).

    img_2274.jpg


    All the pieces and parts ready for grease and final assembly.
    Gear teeth took a little filing for a good enough mesh without binding, just a few hours this time.

    img_2281.jpg

    Made new screens again. The one on left from last time worked alright but was to restrictive, tendency to clog with fine ice and risk overflowing salt water into the ice cream (never did).
    Screen on the right is what came on the tub, lots of sharp edges.
    One installed has larger overall area, larger openings, and pressed dome. It's installed offset lower than center of outlet, so lots of it under the water/ice level instead of half above.

    img_2284.jpg

    Here it is all together, finally.
    Yes it looks strange with so much rear overhang but this wheelbase still fits on a little trailer I can pull behind the car.
    Although the short wheelbase is actually a good thing for maneuverability, which isn't great already and would be pretty terrible with the rear axle most of the way back.
    Still contemplating relieving the bottom rear of frame behind the axle 1" (like top front) but it doesn't really matter and I was running out of time.
    As it sits the center of balance is approximately front of milk can, the engine is seriously heavy for its size.


    img_2286.jpg

    Sunday we did a half batch in the new rear freezer to test it and the new drive system.
    Good thing too, I goofed and had a belt tensioner on the tight side of the belt (instead of slack side) so as the ice cream set and load increased the belt started to slip. It was on right side swinging clockwise (guess it just looked right and I didn't think about it), corrected to left side swinging counter clockwise.
    Luckily it was easy enough to fix and make new anchor for the spring. Glad to take care of that at home on my own time instead of 45 minutes from the shop with dozens and dozens of gallons to churn tomorrow.

    img_2289.jpg


    Otherwise it worked well, bucket didn't leak any, everything staid together. Gear housing ran smooth and quiet, did work some extra grease out of it between the two gears but I'll just wipe it occasionally and it'll probably become less and less of an issue.
    The new stiffer bracket for the milk can worked great, now it doesn't shake and wiggle. Also pleased with the new location of milk can, the fuel pump and filter under it, and new bracket and location for first jack shaft.
    New tensioner for new churn needed a little guard to help the belt stay over the pulley when disengaged, not a big deal and already done and ready to install.

  18. #72
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    I hadn't seen this thread before. Just read it through.

    You're a maniac Grigg. I mean that in the most complementary way.

    This thread should be "the definition" of labor of love.

    I'm guessing there are many such of your doing.

    Your efforts to improve things and do quality work are inspirational.

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  20. #73
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    Thanks,

    It's been a lot of work but fun.

    Today went real well, no trouble at all from engine or either ice cream maker. Not much of anything to change or do different.

    First batch went in at 10:00 and last out just before 4:00, with a pause for lunch and another time waiting for more mix.
    12 total batches which makes near 60 gallons from my machine. Total output for the day, electric 6 quart machines included, is over half our goal already. Tomorrow should be a short day, for comparison last year was over 3 days work.

    img_2292.jpg

    Grigg

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    Grigg -

    Nice job and the location is great also. I've been out of the net for about 4 weeks - always have said I got more done prior to retirement than I do now! Had grandson and granddaughter here for a couple weeks, went to the Adirondacks for a long family weekend, etc. etc. Not complaining at all.

    Just wish I was closer to Lexington so I could get some good ice cream!

    Keep churning.

    Dale

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  23. #75
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    Last week I entered a little thing I made in the county fair and the folks organizing it talked me into going home and fetching the ice cream maker to also enter.
    Thankfully the fair is just a couple miles down the road and they had a skid-loader with forks to unload and load.

    img_2332.jpg

    img_2335.jpg

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  25. #76
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    Grigg -

    Good going. Nothing like taking the prize at the county fair!

    Dale


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