Ice cream maker rebuild - Page 4
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  1. #61
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    Update on the rebuilt Country Freezer gear head.

    We've made a whole lot of ice cream and it's done quite well up until the last batch.
    After every couple batches I remove the gear cover and gears to smear a little fresh grease on the bushings and gear teeth, and I'd just done that 2 batches ago.

    Pictures attached.
    The two main gears pilot one in the other stainless steel on stainless steel and they galled quite a lot. This was never perfect and I tried to keep grease in there but apparently not enough or not right kind.

    img_2053.jpgimg_2049.jpgimg_2047.jpg

    Part of the solution will be an oilite bushing in the smaller gear and clean the spigot some on the other.

    Also notice that the gear tooth contact areas are galling too.
    I've tried two different brands of food safe grease and neither seem to do much good.
    I'm ready to use a real grease that is effective and not necessarily "food safe".

    Any thoughts or recommendations about the problem or solution?

    Grigg

  2. #62
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    Bored the one gear to fit a bushing, already had the bushing just needed to shorten and reduce flange diameter.
    The gear with the spigot was filed and stoned smooth as that diameter was already worn a hair smaller than desirable for the bushing on hand. The face beside spigot I later took a skim cut to clean up after checking assembled height of the gear set.

    img_2055.jpg

    Now to pick a grease and reassemble, then make some ice cream over the weekend.

    Grigg

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  4. #63
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    So far so good on the repair.
    img_2056.jpg

    Ended up using a red high temp grease because it's what I had.
    Still interested in opinions and better ideas on suitable grease for slow speed stainless steel gears.

    We've made I think 4 batches in the last couple weeks.



    Grigg

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  6. #64
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    Seems I didn't have enough fun the first go around rebuilding one of these.
    Actually 5 gallons at a time isn't always enough any more so I'm going to make a new pair of longer frame rails and double up.

    This time however I won't be rebuilding a brand new gear head. Instead I bought the raw castings and can start from that. Though not quite enough metal on them where it matters so making bushings as before.

    img_2183.jpg

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  8. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grigg View Post
    Actually 5 gallons at a time isn't always enough any more so I'm going to make a new pair of longer frame rails and double up.
    Grigg -

    You are falling into the same trap my Dad did in the late 50s. Now if it was a Mills 10 Gallon machine I'd have to scratch my head and come and help run it! Nice step up from the 5 gallon model.

    I'll have to try and remember to take a picture out in the shop tomorrow of some signs.

    Dale

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  10. #66
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    ...and now I'm hungry for some ice cream...."whitehouse" ice cream....

  11. #67
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    Default Flavors from the 50's

    Grigg -

    Think I have told before that my Dad's place had two 5 gallon Mill's machines to make ice cream, then about 1958 or so he came up with a 10 gallon machine and so got rid of the older 5 gallon one. All were bought used as far as I know - it was a very rare and major event to buy anything new. One has to remember that even back then the food business had the highest fatality rate of new start ups.

    At this time of the summer we would have between 30 and 35 flavors of hard ice cream available, plus soft vanilla and chocolate. A number of years ago my brother and I split up the left over signs that were still around. I have mine hung on the wall of my shop/garage - 14 foot ceiling in this part, hence the funny angle of picture. The large sundae was one of two that were on the roof of the building, one at each end - my brother has the other one. Only have 18 flavors, plus the sherbets. Off hand I can see that strawberry,cherry vanilla, butterscotch and black cherry are missing, plus some others that I might think of later. If my memory is right my brother sill has the recipe book - he actually made a lot more ice cream than I did. Starting the year I left for college (66) he made all the ice cream until he left, in 68. By then the business was tapering off some - Dad refused to compromise on quality and at that point people did not want to pay for good ice cream. The prices listed were, I think, what we were charging when I started dipping - at age 9 in 1958. I could barely get into the back of the cabinets and my hands were too small to hold 7 cones like I did later. At that time sundaes, sodas, root beer floats and milk shakes were 30 cents I believe, and banana splits 45 cents. My Dad was a real stickler for portion control - a dip was 3 ounces and it better not be under or over. We were expected to weigh a cone on a regular basis - and he could spot an over/under from 20 feet away. We also had to do all the addition mentally and be correct - we had no registers, adding machines or scratch pads - just two wooden cash tills. Plus you learned quick to always leave the bills on the window counter and hand the change over prior to putting it in the till - to prevent the 'look kid - I gave you a 20 not a 10'.

    Now I can look back at that as a great learning experience but at the time did my share of complaining that I was an abused kid having to work all those hours. Did not complain too much, though - the kids on the neighboring farms were working just as hard.

    And the spoon in the picture has no connection to the ice cream business - got the award as the 'pot stirrer' from the rest of the committee when we called our last pastor. They insisted I hang it there so I did.

    Dale

    ice-cream-1.jpgice-cream-2.jpg

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  13. #68
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    Thanks again Dale for the pictures and stories. The Mill's machines, were they wood tubs and ice, or more modern? What little I can find online about them I'm guessing old and similar design to the White Mountain but perhaps more robust?
    Here's an unusual one by George M Mills looks like dasher travels up and down Patent US314863 - Ice-cream freezer - Google Patents
    Company may have been Thomas Mills & Bro.


    I'm moving along on the upgrade, improvements, and rebuilding another gear head for our ice cream contraption.

    Most all the hardware and materials are in hand and already started on some brackets and little things.

    One item is the new/used wood tub came with a plastic bulkhead fitting siliconed in the bottom and other plastic valves and fittings. I don't care for that and will simplify and use brass/bronze stuff. The big hole at the bottom of the bucket was already sized to fit a 1" thru hull fitting as used on boats, so I found one, made a gasket, trimmed to length (not shown), and made an expanding rubber plug to seal it off real neat and tidy.
    To allow the fitting to sit flush made up a piloted sanding tool to spot face the curved wood inside and out.

    img_2207.jpg

    To accept the new ice cream maker the frame is growing to 7'-6" long and adding two new crossmembers. I like Micarta and decided to make all the crossmembers out of it and also revise the shapes a tad compared to the old ones.
    Hardest part of that so far is just moving the stuff, something like 250 lb of it. A friend came by last week to help get a piece out of the stack and last night to position on the Roll-In saw.
    Using a 3-4 pitch blade it cuts really nice. Get it set on the table and let the saw feed into it 6 or so inches at a time, turn it off, reset, and feed again. It staid put long enough to take the picture, otherwise two hands on it constantly adjusting for a straight cut. The roll in feature though not long enough travel was still really nice, better than hand feeding the whole thing.

    img_2210.jpg

    Grigg


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