Identification of vise table revisited (Further examination) - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Milland View Post
    Do you ever sleep? I'm starting to think the Dance Master (Gordon) was almost right, but reversed, and you're actually five different people around the world writing as Monarchist.
    Quote Originally Posted by Tyrone Shoelaces View Post
    That's been my theory for a long while. " Monarchist " is actually a cabal of retired engineers or maybe " An Infinity Of Monkeys ".


    Regards Tyrone
    I had theorised that he was a university computer science department doing some real world testing and fine tuning their AI / conversational intelligent agent software to be able to hold a technical discussion.

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  3. #22
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    Default Chas. Parker Vises: Desireable, but not Rare

    TheHeavyMetal asked:

    >"I found through a e-bay ad that parker cast dates are punched on the beams and was wondering if other manufacturers did this?"

    Wilton vises have a date code stamped on them, somewhere. AFAIK, that's the only other vise mfr. who did this.

    >"Are there records of production numbers,especially the parkers."

    {Questions should end with a question mark - it helps the reader!]

    No such records survive AFAIK, but see below for a possible source of such information.

    From http://www.thelampworks.com/lw_companies_parker.htm :

    "In 1957 The Charles Parker Company was acquired by the Union Manufacturing Company of New Britain, CT., with the last remnant of the Parker operations ending around 1987."

    Note that the linked webpage in turn cites:
    ##Parker, Lewis C, III, et al. The Parker Story, Knoxville, TN: The Parker Story Joint Venture Group, 2000, vols 1 & 2.

    >"I have not seen any other 289 1/2's.its a great vise but how many are out there?"

    Parker vises are not rare. They tend to be "survivors" - eternally useful for their original purpose, so they are not scrapped. The production numbers must be substantial because I see plenty of them at local flea markets.

    >"what do the 1/2's indicate? and is that 978 the biggest parker?"

    IIRC, the 1/2's indicate Parker models with jaw widths like 3-1/2", 4-1/2" etc. Not sure if I remember this correctly.

    The 978 is not the biggest Parker. A few moments with Google will turn up old catalog pages with Parker model numbers and specifications. The weights go up over 100 lbs.

    >"I hope my days of killin vises are over and since there was a high mortality rate ive acquired a surplus."

    ANY vise can be destroyed by abuse! Don't overstress any vise and don't pound heavily on the so-called "anvil" on the back - that's for light taps from a small hammer, as for tinner's rivets and such. If you want to smack something with a BFH, don't do it on a bench vise! Get a blacksmith's leg vise !

    >"but if theres one that is a coveted relic. I think I should sell."

    A Parker in good condition would qualify as "coveted." Parkers with a swiveling rear jaw for non-parallel work are especially coveted.

    Bonus information: I've seen two Parkers with original paint in a dark maroon color. But vises are not like antique cars: duplicating the original color is not important. IMHO, Kelly Green is a good color for a vise. The raised lettering could be "picked out" in Dulux Gold. (Hint: A "Cosmetic Wedge Sponge" dipped lightly in paint is a good way to "pick out" the tips of the lettering.)

    >"Bonus questions who and when built the ugly one"

    {Again, if you want readers to recognize that something is a question, please use a question mark!]

    There is a visible, though not read-able, maker's mark on the lower end of the moveable jaw. Give us a sharp, well-lit photo of that mark and perhaps you will get the answer you seek. SWAG: It's of European origin.

    This unidentified vise is "interesting" in that it has unusual U-shaped recesses in the back of the stationary jaw. What was their intended use? Swage blocks>

    John Ruth

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  5. #23
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    "I had theorised that he was a university computer science department doing some real world testing and fine tuning their AI / conversational intelligent agent software to be able to hold a technical discussion."

    Could be... They need to find the grandpa Simpson knob and turn it down a few notches.

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  7. #24
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    Could be an infinity of monkeys somehow connected to a reference library in a feedback loop. Would that be an uncountable infinity?

  8. #25
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    I have two of the "ugly Britt's"and a swage block vise has its advantages.these suckers are heavy but I will avoid gettin the 20#er over my head as to not add any more to the"it was a good vise"awhshituary's. thank you John Ruth, positively informative.i expect your a knowledgeable tradesman who's forgotten more than chestbeaters know. moving on.

  9. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by SAG 180 View Post
    I had theorised that he was a university computer science department doing some real world testing and fine tuning their AI / conversational intelligent agent software to be able to hold a technical discussion.
    Which would also Explain Noah Brown (and his offspring)....that or inbreeding.


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