Oil black treatment..... very nice
Largest Manufacturing Technology
Community On The Web
Close
Login to Your Account

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 49
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    St Louis
    Posts
    15,846
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1151
    Likes (Received)
    2182

    Default Oil black treatment..... very nice

    A thank you to Limi Sami and Cizewski for putting me onto that process. Had a little time to try it out and got what I regard as very nice results. Did just what was suggested, heated the parts through the blue into the gray oxide, then dumped them in the oil. No hassle. Used some oil out of the misc odds and ends container, no idea what it was, looks like mostly 90 wt gear oil.

    The other piece of steel is just a reference to show what regular steel looks like in the same light.





    Thanks again, couldn't be easier and result looks good.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Indiana
    Posts
    11,355
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    339
    Likes (Received)
    2670

    Default

    Yesterday, SWMBO oven roasted a chicken in a stainless pan with no lid. Chicken fat sprayed in drops onto the hot pan and left black spots that did not want to be scrubbed off with a copper mesh pot scrubber. I gave up and left some spot on the pan.

    All of which suggests another way of blacking steel parts and getting a very durable finish.

    Larry

  3. Likes SouthBendModel34, jkopel liked this post
  4. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    erie,pa
    Posts
    6,656
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    13253
    Likes (Received)
    3060

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by L Vanice View Post
    Yesterday, SWMBO oven roasted a chicken in a stainless pan with no lid. Chicken fat sprayed in drops onto the hot pan and left black spots that did not want to be scrubbed off with a copper mesh pot scrubber. I gave up and left some spot on the pan.

    All of which suggests another way of blacking steel parts and getting a very durable finish.

    Larry
    ...And preparing a delicious roast chicken at the same time...

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Texas
    Posts
    1,019
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    326
    Likes (Received)
    281

    Default

    Almost every steel part we make gets oil blackened. Its easy and effective. Also gives parts a form of "wear indicator," which is handy for warrenty service. Most parts don't reqire any prep as cutting oil and coolant residue just bake off.

  6. Likes JST, Limy Sami, digger doug liked this post
  7. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Georgia
    Posts
    169
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    183
    Likes (Received)
    71

    Default

    Thanks for posting your results. Since reading that thread I've been wondering just how it would look. This has always been my plan for the nuts/bolts on my 1913 Metz (car) so it is nice to know that it is going to work.

  8. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    St Louis
    Posts
    15,846
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1151
    Likes (Received)
    2182

    Default

    Since you do have to temper the parts to prety soft to do it, past blue temper, it's nit for everything. But it does look good.

  9. #7
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    New Jersey
    Posts
    571
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    51
    Likes (Received)
    197

    Default

    I like that!

  10. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Norfolk, UK
    Posts
    15,626
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    11031
    Likes (Received)
    10571

    Default

    Thanks for posting with pics JST, and I'm glad you're happy.

    Just a thought -long time since I've done it, get 2 pieces of identical material leave one machined finish, one heat blacked, and one oil blacked clean em off and spray liberally with something like WD40 then leave outside but under cover, and watch how they ''weather'' over time - might be interesting and some pics would be nice ?????

    & take care

    Sami

  11. Likes RCPDesigns, Chris Figgatt liked this post
  12. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Baltimore, MD, USA
    Posts
    3,817
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    226
    Likes (Received)
    468

    Default

    I made up a t-nut and stud to mount a BXA tool post on my 14" ATW's compound, I did the black oil treatment on it- came out great. I used waste motor oil from the recycle container. I didn't get the dark color, I think because the part wasn't hot enough.

  13. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Morgantown, WV
    Posts
    586
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    137
    Likes (Received)
    245

    Default

    I showed my boys that process. Generally we use old crap oil and the vapors really smell bad. Several times they have done it in the basement. Talk about something that gets momma fired up!

  14. Likes SouthBendModel34, IronReb liked this post
  15. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Sussex, England
    Posts
    2,939
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    9
    Likes (Received)
    533

    Default

    As to oil black durability I find it good for a year or two, often more, as anti rust on outdoor, garden type, jobs. Varies a lot depending on exposure and how well the black got done. Very much on par with ordinary commercial black bolts.

    Lasts effectively forever inside. Got some parts I did maybe 30 years back in the workshop still looking decent.

    My usual mistake is to try and run too many parts per session through a fairly small pot of oil. Once the oil gets past a bit warm the blackness tends to drop off along with level of protection. I donated a pint of fresh Castrol Magna BD 46 to my pot last time round. Somebody overfilled the P&W gearbox and something had to be done with the excess after syringing it out.

    Clive

  16. Likes Limy Sami liked this post
  17. #12
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Moscow,Idaho,USA
    Posts
    847
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    976
    Likes (Received)
    342

    Default

    dscn0253.jpgI used the same process to blacken some 4-40 screws I made. Works and looks great.

  18. Likes Limy Sami, RCPDesigns liked this post
  19. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Eastern Massachusetts, USA
    Posts
    3,233
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2993
    Likes (Received)
    2780

    Default

    I was turned onto hot oil bluing years ago by someone who was helping restore an antique wagon. The first piece I did was a stamped steel trigger guard off an old Marlin .22 and the blue/black finish that resulted was IMO as good as the average factory bluing.

    On the wagon they used multiple treatments of heat and olive oil that built up a weather resistant finish that was matte black and was actually more of a coating than a blue.

  20. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Eastern Massachusetts, USA
    Posts
    3,233
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2993
    Likes (Received)
    2780

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Greg Menke View Post
    I made up a t-nut and stud to mount a BXA tool post on my 14" ATW's compound, I did the black oil treatment on it- came out great. I used waste motor oil from the recycle container. I didn't get the dark color, I think because the part wasn't hot enough.
    It usually works best with an oil that smokes at a fairly low temperature.

  21. Likes SouthBendModel34, Limy Sami liked this post
  22. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Norfolk, UK
    Posts
    15,626
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    11031
    Likes (Received)
    10571

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Scottl View Post
    It usually works best with an oil that smokes at a fairly low temperature.
    One of the best I ever saw was the old black sulphurised cutting oil - well used and out of a cam auto lathe or similar, stinks worse than shit but no pain no gain.

  23. #16
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    erie,pa
    Posts
    6,656
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    13253
    Likes (Received)
    3060

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Limy Sami View Post
    One of the best I ever saw was the old black sulphurised cutting oil - well used and out of a cam auto lathe or similar, stinks worse than shit but no pain no gain.
    I dunno, my neighbor bought the rear section of a Farmall M, just for a gear,
    it had been sitting for a LONG time, and the oil that came out was
    the blackest I have ever seen, stained your hands so bad, it was hard
    to get rid to the stains even when your hands were clean.

    I've seen some used oil from diesels, that where really black.

    I wonder if the process could use a lower temp, if the oil is heated
    to almost boiling, cold the parts dropped in, and left for 1/2 hour or so.

  24. #17
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    St Louis
    Posts
    15,846
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1151
    Likes (Received)
    2182

    Default

    Beginner's luck!

    Did a small batch, and they turned out with a clear grey. I suspect that eother the oil got too hot, (no idea why that would be an issue), or the parts were not all the way back to a steely grey after passing through boue and purple... not hot enough. But the oil sure bubbled as if it was OK.

    ONE part did come out black and it was not the first one into the oil. Same material for all parts.

  25. #18
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Norfolk, UK
    Posts
    15,626
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    11031
    Likes (Received)
    10571

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JST View Post
    Beginner's luck!

    Did a small batch, and they turned out with a clear grey. I suspect that eother the oil got too hot, (no idea why that would be an issue), or the parts were not all the way back to a steely grey after passing through boue and purple... not hot enough. But the oil sure bubbled as if it was OK.

    ONE part did come out black and it was not the first one into the oil. Same material for all parts.

    IME I'd say not hot enough, and not helped by cold oil.

    FWIW ignoring the colour requirement, the clear grey is still a quite durable finish.

  26. #19
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    St Louis
    Posts
    15,846
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1151
    Likes (Received)
    2182

    Default

    Funny thing.

    The finish looked steel gray when pulled out of the oil. But I left them sitting to cool off and most darkened to a near-black. No idea how, or why. They were not very hot by then, but still quite uncomfortable to hold.

    When they went in, they were hot enough that the oil bubbled and smoked. For the least black one, which was the first in, the oil was still bubbling when the next part went in, which was a smaller part.

    SHOULD the oil be hot, or cold? You seem to suggest not cold, someone else above thought that the color was not as good after the oil was hotter.

    Also: If the color is not good the first time, is there a best way to redo it? I cleaned off the first try for this small run, using detergent to remove the oil so the oil would not burn onto the surface and block oxidizing. Then I heated them to as uniform a gray oxide as possible, and dunked them again. Still got the gray color oout of the oil, but it did darken apparently just from sitting out to drain off oil.

  27. #20
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Vt USA
    Posts
    5,804
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    488
    Likes (Received)
    1756

    Default

    Drain oil from the tractor gives the deepest color!

    When the parts are large enough, and hot enough, a wonderful "open flame event" can be part of the experience.

    Pyros like that a lot! '-)

    Indoors, the baked and blackened oil finish lasts a life time.!


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •