Shaper Forming Hot Iron - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    I had a crank shaper years ago, but I never used it for hot forming. I'd not thought of it yet; or, more accurately, I had not yet met my wise mentor who shoed me in that direction with the, "well of course" response that experience brings. Anyway, when I overload my geared shaper, whether on a cut or forming, the belt slips. The belt is its built in power. Don't think it doesn't deliver power though, because a flat belt can deliver just as much power as anything. A motor will pull down or stall; a belt slips--it's the same thing, except that a belt will come off if it can, removing the power altogether. I'm certain your motor would stall if you fed your shaper too much. Try it. Bump the head up against the vise and see what happens. But please don't sue me if it breaks in half.

    I'm sure someone here has stopped their crank shaper somehow. Anyone want to pipe in??

    Another thing about your crank shaper is that it will have different power at different points in the cycle, as well as for different stroke lengths. Being a crank, it'll have more power at the end of the stroke. Just like a toggle press, you want to work at the bottom, or end, of the stroke. When you're using a short stroke, the crank is closer to the shaft, so it'll have more power than with a long stroke. My geared shaper is the same anywhere except while it's shifting, which is right at the end of the stroke. When the forward belt is partly off the drive pulley and the return belt is climbing onto it, there's less power. It requires a little momentum to complete the cycle.

    On that note, when I set up my planer (also a belt shifter) I had it running too fast, and it pushed the stops every time it turned around. It had too much momentum. I slowed it down, and it works fine.

  2. #22
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    Another example here...

    Working Hot Metal with a Shaper - YouTubeI think it's a great idea...

  3. #23
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    Nice ideas. Thanks for sharing

  4. #24
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    you do realize this is Joel's shaper, the same one, in his shop, right?
    just with a different die set.

    Quote Originally Posted by LKeithR View Post
    Another example here...

    Working Hot Metal with a Shaper - YouTubeI think it's a great idea...

  5. #25
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    I'd be leery of trying to stop a crank shaper, there's a lot of momentum behind it and in ordinary shaper work an overload would probably end in a broken tool, not a stopped machine.

    You can, however, set the position of the stroke very accurately. Iv would think hot metal would have just enough give to let you bottom out the dies. I use to do some hot work in a punch press and I would creep up on the setting while turning the flywheel by hand. (I usually used a small piece of stock and a piece of paper as a setting guide.)

  6. #26
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    If I was going to try to do bending that required a bottoming action like that Z bend with a crank shaper I would use a leaf spring arrangement to do the pushing on the die.

    Depending on the shaper its not just a unstoppable hit like a punch press. Some have clutches that allow the operator to feather the power to the ram. The stroke still has to be completed unless the input is turned backwards, but its doesn't have to be an inevitable process. My G&E had a clutch feel that was wonderful.

  7. #27
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    "If I was going to try to do bending that required a bottoming action like that Z bend with a crank shaper I would use a leaf spring arrangement to do the pushing on the die."

    That's a good idea, gbent. How about a few stiff coil springs? They wouldn't have to be long, since it shouldn't require much travel. I like to pick up valve springs at the junk yard for that kind of thing. You could build in stops on the die so that it still returned at the same point, just softer.


    "I'd be leery of trying to stop a crank shaper, there's a lot of momentum behind it and in ordinary shaper work an overload would probably end in a broken tool, not a stopped machine.

    You can, however, set the position of the stroke very accurately. Iv would think hot metal would have just enough give to let you bottom out the dies. I use to do some hot work in a punch press and I would creep up on the setting while turning the flywheel by hand. (I usually used a small piece of stock and a piece of paper as a setting guide.)"

    fciron, Most cutting operations are done at a higher cutting speed than my shaper runs, which is set up mainly for bending. Do you think if the speed were slowed way down there'd still be the momentum problem? Maybe a motor driven one would have more torque then and the problem would actually be worse, I don't know. I'd love to see some of the hot work you've done with the punch press. I use mine for hot work all the time--as much as a power hammer. I say a press can do anything a hammer can do, and many operations are a lot easier with a press than with a hammer, though others are more awkward.


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