The Standard Electrical Tool Co, Twin Wheel Tool Grinder
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  1. #1
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    Default The Standard Electrical Tool Co, Twin Wheel Tool Grinder

    I picked this up today. Needs some work but I'm excited to get it cleaned up and operational. I don't know a lot about it yet. The catalog pic is from around 1952, which I found here:
    Standard Electrical Tool Co. - Publication Reprints | VintageMachinery.org

    But I don't know the machines build year, guessing between late 40's to mid 50's.

    Some manufacture info here as well:
    Standard Electrical Tool Co. - History | VintageMachinery.org

    Mine has the 10" wheels and is listed as 10TD. The wheels spin, but the tables and guards are stuck. I need to get it tore down and go through it a bit. It supposedly has a bad motor, but I'm not sure yet.

    1.jpg2.jpg3.jpg4.jpg5.jpg

  2. #2
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    If anyone knows anything about them or has any thoughts, please post.

    Tag and catalog info:

    7.jpg6.jpg8.jpg9.jpg

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    Looks like a decent tool grinder to me.

    440V only motor is inconvenient, but the "bad" motor prob reduced your cost. A replacement 220/440 3 phase foot mount motor should be under $50. and you could even go single phase if you were willing to pay quite a bit more.

    Coolant pump belt was prob removed because the pump needs attention. Small electric submersible pumps are cheap enough if yours isn't easily fixable.

    6" wheels are more common than 10". If substituting, perhaps the proper wheel rpm could be achieved by a sheave change.

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    Check out wheel hole pattern and such to see wheel is still in the catalog..Could be a 60s machine...likely the same wheel as the Hammond..soak every thing for a week or two before cranking on tight bolts.

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    Dave was looking for 10" wheels earlier this year - a PM or email to him might tell you if he did any good

    WTB 10" plate type grinding wheel for Hammond grinder

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    Quote Originally Posted by johnoder View Post
    Maybe HAMMOND

    Excellent for aluminum oxide grinding of such as hefty HSS lathe tools, or silicon carbide (green wheels) for shaping hefty brazed carbide lathe tools, but not finishing their cutting edges which needs to be done on diamond wheels

    One supposes diamond wheels for this may be available for pricey type costs - in fact ALL these "plate mounted" style wheels are more and more out of the ordinary
    Linked from another thread, when I was asking some advice.


    Quote Originally Posted by johnoder View Post
    Dave was looking for 10" wheels earlier this year - a PM or email to him might tell you if he did any good

    WTB 10" plate type grinding wheel for Hammond grinder
    Quote Originally Posted by neilho View Post
    Looks like a decent tool grinder to me.

    440V only motor is inconvenient, but the "bad" motor prob reduced your cost. A replacement 220/440 3 phase foot mount motor should be under $50. and you could even go single phase if you were willing to pay quite a bit more.

    Coolant pump belt was prob removed because the pump needs attention. Small electric submersible pumps are cheap enough if yours isn't easily fixable.

    6" wheels are more common than 10". If substituting, perhaps the proper wheel rpm could be achieved by a sheave change.
    I came across this machine kinda by accident, I was looking for a tool grinder, but had something else in mind at the time. As johnoder pointed out originally that it would be good for rough shaping, not finishing, and nielho mentioned 10" plate wheels are not as common. Well in searching around I think thats pretty much right. I was considering changing the machine to a 6" wheel or something else. But I found I can get 10" wheels for rough work, plus Norton abrasives claim I can get made to order, non-stock availility wheels. Which works for me as I can keep the machine more original.

    And in thinking about it, and as you guys were talking about it I was looking at 6" diamond wheels, and other 6" wheels. Where I got this machine, the fella there had another machine that was a 6" I found pretty interesting. So I went back the next day and got it. Its from Hammond Machinery Builders. Well I think I'll keep both machines. Put a diamond wheel on the one side of the Hammond, and use the Standard Electric Tool machine for rough heavier work.

    I plan on doing a bit of a restore to both machines. I'll create a new thread for the Hammond, and do updates of the Standard Electric here. A couple of pics of the Hammond in the meantime:

    10.jpg12.jpg13.jpg14.jpg15.jpg

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    Is there any "up and down" on the "vise" side of the Hammond?

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    Some Blanchard type wheels can be re-holed and such to fit an out of found wheel..Check RPM specs. Most plates can be drilled and cut on a lathe...*but take care because they don't ring test, so you don't want the stress the wheel.

    *Always slow turn any spindle that has been setting for a time..a slug of hard oil or grease can cause a ball to not roll at start and so damage the bearings.. same for plane bearings..and *first be sure plane bearing have oil at both ends.

    If a bearing dose not feel smooth by hand consider at least tear down and clean and lube before running at speed.. a dry or not smooth bearing will be noisy or short life. Some may say if you tear it down then might as well put in new bearings.

    saw a grinder spindle filled with oil and so perg the bearings.. still running last time I saw the machine.

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    I have a "standard" 12" pedestal grinder. It is also 440V only but I run it fine on 240V. I am not brave enough to try to choke a 5hp grinder with something I am holding in my hands so the power reduction doesn't matter to me. I have had it for years, it works great and runs smooth.

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    Quote Originally Posted by johnoder View Post
    Is there any "up and down" on the "vise" side of the Hammond?
    Quote Originally Posted by michiganbuck View Post
    Some Blanchard type wheels can be re-holed and such to fit an out of found wheel..Check RPM specs. Most plates can be drilled and cut on a lathe...*but take care because they don't ring test, so you don't want the stress the wheel.

    *Always slow turn any spindle that has been setting for a time..a slug of hard oil or grease can cause a ball to not roll at start and so damage the bearings.. same for plane bearings..and *first be sure plane bearing have oil at both ends.

    If a bearing dose not feel smooth by hand consider at least tear down and clean and lube before running at speed.. a dry or not smooth bearing will be noisy or short life. Some may say if you tear it down then might as well put in new bearings.

    saw a grinder spindle filled with oil and so perg the bearings.. still running last time I saw the machine.
    Lifting up and down on vice side, its not banging, but it feels like maybe .002" or .003".

    By the looks of both machines, I'd say they have not been run in somewhere between 10 and 20 years. The paint is old, and it looks like they were painted after last use, as everything is painted, handles, dials, tables etc. I believe they came from the same place, which was a property or building being cleared out. Though I dont know the details.

    I plan on tearing these both down the whole way. So i'll get a look at the bearings, and such. As it looks less time consuming, I'll probably start with the Hammond. But it'll probably take me a week or two before I really tear into it, I need to finish some other things first.

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    Quote Originally Posted by johnoder View Post
    Is there any "up and down" on the "vise" side of the Hammond?
    I have the same one and yes, it does move up and down. I was told that the Hammond is set up specifically for sharpening lathe tooling, and the vice side is for making the chipbreaker with the narrow wheel, and the side with the table is for grinding your angles. I have the same unit, but have not set it up or used it. We do have one at work that I use.
    Joe

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    Quote Originally Posted by jdavi581 View Post
    I have the same one and yes, it does move up and down. I was told that the Hammond is set up specifically for sharpening lathe tooling, and the vice side is for making the chipbreaker with the narrow wheel, and the side with the table is for grinding your angles. I have the same unit, but have not set it up or used it. We do have one at work that I use.
    Joe
    Lol, I see I misunderstood johnoder's question. With pretty much all my dials and adjustments stuck, I hadn't figured out all the movements yet. I was curious about the skinny wheel, you answered that one, which is pretty awesome, thanks.

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    Quote Originally Posted by texasgunsmith View Post
    Lol, I see I misunderstood johnoder's question. With pretty much all my dials and adjustments stuck, I hadn't figured out all the movements yet. I was curious about the skinny wheel, you answered that one, which is pretty awesome, thanks.
    I have the Hammond, and a Cincinnati Tool and Cutter grinder that I picked up at an auction for 100. I think the Cinci can do it all, but I may keep it for setting up on carbide. I think I will fix them both up, and use. If I can do it all on the Cinci, I will sell.
    Joe


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