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Thread: giant cranes

  1. #101
    D Foster is offline Plastic
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    Hi Guys,

    Not been around for some time, but I have been searching for information and pictures of Giant Cantilever and Hammerhead cranes in the interim. Hopefully you will find some of these interesting:

    http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1309/...2998ee0b_b.jpg
    http://www.shippingtimes.co.uk/images/barclaycurle.jpg

    Barclay Curle & Co crane, Scotstoun, Glasgow

    http://www.river-clyde.org.uk/images...0-%20Crane.jpg
    Titan Crane, James Watt Dock, Greenock

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/nol/shared/spl...7922/img/1.jpg
    http://cache.daylife.com/imageserve/...VR2n1/340x.jpg
    Titan Crane, John Browns Shipyard, Glasgow

    http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3021/...2bfbdba1_b.jpg
    Whyalla, South Australia

    http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2253/...abef880a_b.jpg
    NEM crane, Wallsend

    http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2183/...a0fd15e9_b.jpg
    Shepherd Offshore, Tyneside, formerly Vickers Maxim?

    http://www.hartshorn.us/Navy/crane-Yokosuka.jpg
    Yokosuka, Japan

    http://www.sproston.com/images/brixe...hammerhead.jpg
    Pearl Harbor Hammerhead Crane, built 1935, 200ton capacity, scrapped 1980

    http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2366/...1554c04b_b.jpg
    Brooklyn Navy Yard
    Last edited by D Foster; 09-16-2008 at 08:51 AM.

  2. #102
    JHOLLAND1's Avatar
    JHOLLAND1 is online now Titanium
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    Gustave Eiffel answered critics of his tower before its assembly on the Champ de Mars.
    "There is an attraction and charm inherent in the colossal that is not subject to ordinary theories of art."
    Each of these lifting structures had a brutal appeal that tagged its location. Container hoisting gantry cranes may be more efficient but monotonous and devoid of character.

  3. #103
    D Foster is offline Plastic
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    Mitsubishi Shipyard, Nagasaki, Japan:

    http://hikoma.lb.nagasaki-u.ac.jp/view/5/5233.jpg & http://hikoma.lb.nagasaki-u.ac.jp/view/3/3834.jpg

    "This is a hand-tinted picture postcard published between 1890 and 1920 and showing the hammerhead crane at the Mitsubishi Nagasaki Shipyard. The 150-ton electric hammerhead crane was imported from Motherwell Bridge Company of Scotland in 1909 and installed alongside the Mitsubishi shipyard at Akunoura."

    Rosyth Dockyard, Scotland:

    http://farm1.static.flickr.com/55/13...e7553b11_b.jpg

    Does anyone know if the crane still exists?

  4. #104
    D Foster is offline Plastic
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    Yokosuka Naval Yard, Japan.

    View showing the 350 ton Hammerhead crane on the right and a smaller older (1918) Giant Cantilever crane on the left hand quay:

    http://images.google.co.uk/imgres?im...%3Den%26sa%3DN

    Yokosuka 350 ton crane - picture probably taken from the Giant Cantilever crane?

    http://www.servicepals.com/gallery/d...uka__japan.jpg

  5. #105
    cutting oil Mac is offline Hot Rolled
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    Rosyth dockyard - Re D Foster, ,yes the big Rosyth dockyard crane is still in operation, I frequently see it going over the Forth road bridge, when i visit my daughter in Dunfermline As an aside to cranes has anyone ever seen the photographs of Admiral Beatties grand fleet, proceeding under the Forth Railway bridge, having left Rosyth naval dockyard heading out into the North sea, where they met the German fleet at Jutland the following evening This was a masterpiece of photography, being taken in the moonlight, The late Sir Winston Churchill stated that Rosyth, was Britains finest located Royal dockyard ( Sorry to go off topic slightly)

  6. #106
    D Foster is offline Plastic
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    Thanks for the info, I had heard that it was due for scrapping recently.

  7. #107
    Mark McGrath is offline Diamond
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    Quote "
    Rosyth Dockyard, Scotland:

    http://farm1.static.flickr.com/55/13...e7553b11_b.jpg

    Does anyone know if the crane still exists?"

    This crane was scrapped along with several others in the last two years.They did off course spend several hundred thousand pounds overhauling them first.
    Mark.

  8. #108
    D Foster is offline Plastic
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    Hi Mark,

    Thank you for the information - well that's the world total of surviving giant cantilevers down by two with the loss of the Titan Crane at BAE Systems Fairfield Yard in Glasgow last year:

    http://images.google.co.uk/imgres?im...%3Den%26sa%3DG

    Dale

  9. #109
    Mark McGrath is offline Diamond
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    Apparently there were five Titans on the Clyde at one time.Is that only two left now?

    Mark.

  10. #110
    cutting oil Mac is offline Hot Rolled
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    Read your post this morning Mark, & went up to my Daughters over Forth bridge today, cant believe Royal Dockyard Titan, is no longer with us, I thought it was still in situ, within the last few months, Time must be playing tricks with me, It looked from a distance in very smart condition, Had a nice paint job,

    Titans still with us, on the Clyde 4 off--- The James Watt Dock Crane Greenock
    John Brown Crane Clydebank.
    Barclay Curle Crane at Whiteinch,Glasgow ( Formerly the old North British Diesel Engine Co, Makers of ships diesel engines-- Not to be confused with the North British Loco Co)

    Finnieston Crane, Glasgow will be easily accessed by visitors from the town centre when preserve, Pity the big hook & its pulley block, + all the ropes have been removed, Scrapped perhaps? I can wager a guess that there will be no finance available to put the said items back on, This will make it rather meaningless as an industrial artifact Typical!

  11. #111
    Mark McGrath is offline Diamond
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    I read somewhere that the block and ropes were removed from the Finnieston crane for safety reasons.Apparently the jib section is enclosed/being enclosed in stainless steel mesh to make a visual impact with the lighting that`s going on it.Probably to keep the pigeons out also.
    I was aware of the Barclay Curle Titan but have not worked in either Greenock or Clydebank for years so was not sure if they were still there.
    Was thinking also about the big gantry crane in,I think, Fergusons at Greenock.Was right on the side of the Glasgow road.Trying to remember if it was 200 or 400 tons.
    What about Butters cranes?Do they still exist?I remember about 1970 a company I worked for in Bathgate built two towers for them for derrick cranes for Hong Kong.We trial erected them in the yard before they went.

  12. #112
    cutting oil Mac is offline Hot Rolled
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    Hello Mark,
    The old established firm of Butters is long gone a victim of the "crazy mid eighties" I think it was merged with Kone ?, And Bennie Butters the director is dead also, Butters supplied many o/head & derrick cranes all over the country & a very nice range of advanced design dockside cranes also, they never were big enough as a firm to enter into the titan crane market, Although along with Anderson Grice of Carnoustie, it would be a toss up of a coin, as to which firm built the last steam driven derrick, Butters in the 1970 period & Anderson Grice possibly slightly later.

    On thew lower Clyde, I think the cranes you might remember, are at Port Glasgow, theiir are two fair sized but reasonably light duty shipyard cranes at Fergusons Newark yard, and some larger shipyard cranes at the remains of the Glen yard Port Glasgow, (formerly Lithgows) Dont know who owns it now.
    Interested in the proposal on the Finnieston crane Wonder will it be Yuppified ? Still if the stainless steel keeps the pigeons out!

  13. #113
    D Foster is offline Plastic
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    In light of this thread it might be worth putting up a listing of surviving giant cantilever and hammerhead cranes and details where known.

    How about this to start with:

    'Giant Cantilever Cranes'

    James Watt Dock, Greenock - Arrol Titan - 250 ton? - ropes and blocks removed but crane currently survives.

    John Browns Shipyard, Clydebank - Arrol Titan - 250 ton - crane preserved.

    Barclay Curle & Co, Glasgow - Arrol Titan - 100 ton + - crane intact at this time.

    Stobcross Crane - Arrol Titan - 250 ton? - crane not rigged but conserved.

    Shepherd Offshore (former Vickers Armstrong Shipyard), Tyneside - 250 ton with 20 ton/ 5 ton travelling crane on boom - Arrol Titan? - crane still in use for loading materials for North Sea oil industry.

    Barrow-in-Furness - http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2291/...6ad5c131_o.jpg - anyone know anything about this one?

    Cowes - Babcock and Willcox 80 ton crane built 1911 - crane still extant pending preservation (with luck).

    Garden Island, Sydney - Arrol Titan, 250 ton - crane preserved, recently undergoing maintenance I believe.

    Mitsubishi Shipyard, Nagasaki - 150 ton crane - believed still in existence.

    Heavy lift hammerhead cranes:

    Netaji Subhas Dock, Calcutta - 200 ton crane - still in use.

    Puget Sound Naval Base, Bremerton - 300 ton crane - still in use.

    Portsmouth Naval Shipyard, Virginia - 300 ton? crane - still in use?

    If anyone knows of other cranes or extra details please add them below.

  14. #114
    Walter A's Avatar
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    QUOTE=D Foster
    In light of this thread it might be worth putting up a listing of surviving giant cantilever and hammerhead cranes and details where known.

    How about this to start with:

    'Giant Cantilever Cranes'

    James Watt Dock, Greenock - Arrol Titan - 250 ton? - ropes and blocks removed but crane currently survives.

    John Browns Shipyard, Clydebank - Arrol Titan - 250 ton - crane preserved.

    Barclay Curle & Co, Glasgow - Arrol Titan - 100 ton + - crane intact at this time.

    Stobcross Crane - Arrol Titan - 250 ton? - crane not rigged but conserved.

    Shepherd Offshore (former Vickers Armstrong Shipyard), Tyneside - 250 ton with 20 ton/ 5 ton travelling crane on boom - Arrol Titan? - crane still in use for loading materials for North Sea oil industry.

    Barrow-in-Furness - http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2291/...6ad5c131_o.jpg - anyone know anything about this one?

    Cowes - Babcock and Willcox 80 ton crane built 1911 - crane still extant pending preservation (with luck).

    Garden Island, Sydney - Arrol Titan, 250 ton - crane preserved, recently undergoing maintenance I believe.

    Mitsubishi Shipyard, Nagasaki - 150 ton crane - believed still in existence.

    Heavy lift hammerhead cranes:

    Netaji Subhas Dock, Calcutta - 200 ton crane - still in use.

    Puget Sound Naval Base, Bremerton - 300 ton crane - still in use.

    Portsmouth Naval Shipyard, Virginia - 350 ton crane - still in use - http://www.michaelgatti.com/photos/h...s/page_12.html - Walter A. 10/13/2008

    If anyone knows of other cranes or extra details please add them below.

  15. #115
    bryan_machine is offline Titanium
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    OK, as always I wonder why did such a form appear, and why has it apparently disappeared?

    In particular, why a hammerhead? And why no longer a hammerhead - seems there are very few or no new fixed hammerhead's built in the last few decades. Why? (Something else is better cheaper, but what/how?)

  16. #116
    D Foster is offline Plastic
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    In short I am not entirely certain, but hazarding a guess, I would imagine the hammerhead pattern lent itself to the loadings required when luffing boom crane technology was less advanced?

    However look at the situation nowadays - you can get truck mounted cranes that can equal and exceed the lifting capabilities of the fixed hammerhead cranes - so I imagine the versatility of this sort of machine makes a fixed crane largely outmoded today.


    Anyway as an update to an earlier post the large fixed hammerhead crane at Devonport Dockyard has now been removed, however the operation to remove it was an impressive piece of engineering:

    http://www.slide.com/r/GCyAU8Ob0D_fC...?view=original

    Dockside hammerhead lowered in one piece
    01 October 2008

    A major engineering project to remove a 1,450 deadweight dockside crane, used to refuel Royal Navy submarines, was successfully completed in Plymouth, UK on September 28.

    The work was carried out as a joint partnership between Babcock Marine’s Devonport operation, the Ministry of Defence and subcontractor Mammoet.

    Constructed in the 1970s, the Stothert and Pitt hammerhead cantilever crane had reached the end of its design life. Various methods were considered to achieve the removal of this colossal crane structure with optimum safety and minimum disruption. The crane’s steel jib structure (120 metres long, 22 metres high by 8.5 metres wide) was supported on a slew ring, mounted on a concrete plinth built on four two-metre-square reinforced concrete legs extending down into the bedrock.

    Babcock Marine’s special projects director Malcolm Smith explained that a one-piece removal of the crane jib was chosen as the safest and least disruptive option. “It required one tenth of the hours worked at extreme height, making it safer than the in-situ balanced disassembly methods. It also considerably shortened the facility unavailability period from ten to four months. And it allowed the nearby offices to remain occupied with only short evacuation periods during crane lifts over the buildings, avoiding the need for long-term relocation of several hundred workers.”

    Babcock Marine recruited the services of Dutch heavy lifting specialist Mammoet to handle the project. Two of the main gantry beams used in the project were used, extended, in the lifting of the Russian nuclear submarine K-141 Kursk from the Barents Sea in 2001.

    The process involved the hydraulic inch-by-inch transfer of the main high-level jib horizontally across temporary beams during good weather to a position directly over a dock while supported on shorter lowering beams. It was then lowered, very slowly onto a floating barge.


    Safety was paramount throughout the project, said Smith: “No nuclear submarines were in the vicinity during the lowering, and about 600 staff in the refit complex were moved during the work. This was a huge logistics exercise, in addition to the major engineering feat this project represents.”

    The crane will now be disassembled at the dockyard, and the metal towers dismantled. Disassembly will continue through into January 2009.

    The 1,450 tonne structure, with a lifting capacity of 80 tonnes, was located in the Submarine Refit Complex serving two adjacent nuclear powered submarine docking facilities to support the refitting of Swiftsure and Trafalgar class submarines, and workshops, training and storage areas.

    Its removal makes way for a new world class low level defueling facility (reactor access house and rail system), currently under development as part of the Ministry of Defence £200 million Future Nuclear Facilities investment programme at Devonport, contracted to Babcock Marine and due for completion in about four to five years.

    Roger Hardy, Babcock Marine’s submarine managing director added: “The removal of the refuel crane is a major milestone in the upgrade of the nuclear submarine facilities here at Devonport.

    “It represents a significant step towards the completion of new defueling facilities which will be constructed to the highest nuclear standards in then world. I have been particularly impressed by the way the joint Babcock Marine and MOD team, along with their sub-contractor Mammoet, handled this complex engineering task with upmost professionalism and to the highest of safety standards.’’

  17. #117
    Peter S is offline Diamond
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    About 10 or more years ago I bought a video titled Lifting the Big Ones from KHL in the UK. It is a 60 minute video featuring ten different heavy lifts around the world. It is a good one, not an exciting TV -style presentation, but a serious attempt to show what takes place. The guy who filmed it was Richard Krabbendam, I just did a search and found his website, he may still offer the video.

    http://www.heavyliftspecialist.com/index.php?id=4&L=2

    Some of the lifts are:

    Lifting two 260 tonne tanks,
    Erecting a 360 ton column
    Lifting 480 and 512 tonnes columns
    Erecting a 634 tonnes, 112 metre long column
    etc etc.

  18. #118
    Mark McGrath is offline Diamond
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    Not antique but something that caught my eye and may interest someone.
    A new crane has been ordered for the Rosyth dockyard.When built it will be the "largest in Britain"
    These are not my words as I don`t agree with their understanding of largest.I have of course forgotten the details now but it would appear to be a gantry type crane of substantial height with a lifting and travelling capacity of 1000 tonnes.
    I will try and remember where I read this and post more details but I don`t mind if some of you people with more time on their hands than me can dig up the relevant info.
    Mark.

  19. #119
    ImanCarrot is offline Aluminum
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    My grandfather used to drive this one before he jumped off it and killed himself (no kidding)

    Glasgow Clydeside
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails glasgow-20crane-20train.jpg  

  20. #120
    Asquith is offline Diamond
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    I’ve been sent these photos of a hammerhead crane in Calcutta, to ask if anyone knows the maker, date, etc.

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