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Thread: Hendey lathe??

  1. #1
    shapeaholic is offline Stainless
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    Gents,
    Check out this late model Hendey! I've never seen anything like it before, and all I know about it is that it's for sale. (not by me)

    http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y45...90137859-1.jpg

    http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y45...90137859-2.jpg


    Does anyone have any information?

    Pete

  2. #2
    shapeaholic is offline Stainless
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    Sudbury Ontario, Canada
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    Post

    Gents,
    Check out this late model Hendey! I've never seen anything like it before, and all I know about it is that it's for sale. (not by me)

    http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y45...90137859-1.jpg

    http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y45...90137859-2.jpg


    Does anyone have any information?

    Pete

  3. #3
    johnoder's Avatar
    johnoder is offline Diamond
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    Houston, TX USA
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    I have a brochure. Barber Colman's late effort with 32 speeds. Aparently not many made or sold.

    This one just got sprayed

    John

  4. #4
    johnoder's Avatar
    johnoder is offline Diamond
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    I have a brochure. Barber Colman's late effort with 32 speeds. Aparently not many made or sold.

    This one just got sprayed

    John

  5. #5
    hendeyman is offline Stainless
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    elfrida arizona usa
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    Shapeaholic:

    As Johnoder has mentioned, the lathe in your
    picture is not a Hendey, but a Barber Colman.
    Because of the low production figures, these lathe
    are seldom seen. They are a well built, first
    class lathe. If a you could buy this lathe at a
    price you could afford, I think you would be very
    please with the way it operates. Since you have
    broached the subject about Barber Colman lathes,
    perhaps a little background information would be
    in order.

    The Hendey plant in Torrington, Connecticut
    stopped production in October 1954 and plans had
    been made to move a portion of the manufacturing
    facilities to the Barber Colman plant in Rockford,
    Illinois. On February 2, 1955, a meeting was
    held in the Barber Colman offices to decide which
    of the Hendey products would continue to be manu-
    factured. Only the 9" Tool and Gage Makers lathe,
    the #2 General Purpose lathe, the 12,14 and 16 inch geared head lathes, the 12 inch high speed
    shaper and the 16"-20" shaper were to remain,
    everything else was dropped. These products be-
    came the Hendey Machine Division of Barber Colman. Once these items were back in production Barber Colman decided to design and produce there own lathe line.


    The models developed by Barber Colman were the
    1307 x 24 Tool Room Lathe, the 1610T Tool Room
    Lathe, 1610 Facing, Turning and Boring Lathe, 2013
    Geared Head Lathe and the 2516 Geared head Lathe.
    The first three lathes are variable speed (elec-
    tronic) and the last two are mechanical drive.
    The 2013 and 2516 are identical lathes, except one
    has a larger swing. The lathe shown in your pic-
    ture is one of the 2013/2516 type. When first
    introduced in 1957, they were 32 speed lathes, but
    by 1958 they were 36 speed models. The serial
    numbers on these machines will begin with the
    letters DHL, production was less than 60 lathes.
    All lathe and shaper production had ended by 1962.

    Hendeyman

  6. #6
    hendeyman is offline Stainless
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    elfrida arizona usa
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    Post

    Shapeaholic:

    As Johnoder has mentioned, the lathe in your
    picture is not a Hendey, but a Barber Colman.
    Because of the low production figures, these lathe
    are seldom seen. They are a well built, first
    class lathe. If a you could buy this lathe at a
    price you could afford, I think you would be very
    please with the way it operates. Since you have
    broached the subject about Barber Colman lathes,
    perhaps a little background information would be
    in order.

    The Hendey plant in Torrington, Connecticut
    stopped production in October 1954 and plans had
    been made to move a portion of the manufacturing
    facilities to the Barber Colman plant in Rockford,
    Illinois. On February 2, 1955, a meeting was
    held in the Barber Colman offices to decide which
    of the Hendey products would continue to be manu-
    factured. Only the 9" Tool and Gage Makers lathe,
    the #2 General Purpose lathe, the 12,14 and 16 inch geared head lathes, the 12 inch high speed
    shaper and the 16"-20" shaper were to remain,
    everything else was dropped. These products be-
    came the Hendey Machine Division of Barber Colman. Once these items were back in production Barber Colman decided to design and produce there own lathe line.


    The models developed by Barber Colman were the
    1307 x 24 Tool Room Lathe, the 1610T Tool Room
    Lathe, 1610 Facing, Turning and Boring Lathe, 2013
    Geared Head Lathe and the 2516 Geared head Lathe.
    The first three lathes are variable speed (elec-
    tronic) and the last two are mechanical drive.
    The 2013 and 2516 are identical lathes, except one
    has a larger swing. The lathe shown in your pic-
    ture is one of the 2013/2516 type. When first
    introduced in 1957, they were 32 speed lathes, but
    by 1958 they were 36 speed models. The serial
    numbers on these machines will begin with the
    letters DHL, production was less than 60 lathes.
    All lathe and shaper production had ended by 1962.

    Hendeyman

  7. #7
    jlegge is offline Hot Rolled
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    Oct 2004
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    Rockford, IL
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    For a town dominated by milling machine builders, it nice to see that a top shelf lathe as was design and built in Rockford. it is a shame not more were built. It seems that the early 60's was a rough time for many machine builders, with many of them going out of business or being sold. Does anyone happen to know what might have been the cause?

    John

  8. #8
    jlegge is offline Hot Rolled
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Rockford, IL
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    Post

    For a town dominated by milling machine builders, it nice to see that a top shelf lathe as was design and built in Rockford. it is a shame not more were built. It seems that the early 60's was a rough time for many machine builders, with many of them going out of business or being sold. Does anyone happen to know what might have been the cause?

    John

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