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Thread: J. Holroyd & co ltd horizontal milling machine

  1. #1
    timbo917 is offline Plastic
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    Default J. Holroyd & co ltd horizontal milling machine

    Hello,

    After almost a year of searching I finaly found a small milling machine
    to complete my workshop. It was verry cheap so it needs a lot of TLC.
    Anyone more documentation of this maker and machine?
    I found the maker but not much info about it.
    regards

    tim


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  2. #2
    thermite is offline Diamond
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    Quote Originally Posted by timbo917 View Post
    Hello,

    After almost a year of searching I finaly found a small milling machine
    to complete my workshop. It was verry cheap so it needs a lot of TLC.
    Anyone more documentation of this maker and machine?
    I found the maker but not much info about it.
    regards

    tim


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    Not all THAT much TLC 'coz it is brute-simple.

    Basically, you've got a pair of spindle bearings, the X-Y-Z screws, their nuts and thrust arrangement, and the ways for each axis to put right.

    If the power-feed is too far gone, just hang a surplus gearmotor and VFD or DC Drive directly onto either a still-good worm or the leadscrew directly. No pressing need to make or source gears, and the rest - bearings, and how you power-it-up, for example - is pretty flexible as to sorting out.

    Bill

  3. #3
    Tyrone Shoelaces is offline Titanium
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    Belgium must be a desert for milling machines Timbo if it took you a year to find a museum piece like that. For your information " Holroyd " are still in business in Milnrow near Rochdale, about 2 miles from where I live. They are World leaders in the manufacture of screw compressor rotor grinding machines, previously they made screw milling machines. I couldn't tell you when they last made a conventional milling machine.

    They are owned by a Chinese company now, the same people who own Jones and Shipman grinding machines. Maybe they'd be interested in taking the miller off your hands to use as a show piece.

    Regards Tyrone.
    Last edited by Tyrone Shoelaces; 12-07-2013 at 01:03 PM.

  4. #4
    timbo917 is offline Plastic
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    I could not say that its a desert but I know a lot of vintage machines where
    scraped when the metal prices where higer a couple of years ago.
    Most of machines I went to take a look at where huge or they asked a fortune.
    So you could say it took me a year to exacly find what I was looking for.
    Thanks for the tip on the company who made it,wil contact them for some info but
    I am not planning on selling it. I want to restore and use it.
    baldwin likes this.

  5. #5
    billmac is offline Hot Rolled
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    Timbo -

    I would be a bit surprised if you got any useful information about your mill from Holroyds. I have known people from there for a fairly long time and through all of that period they were concerned mostly with screw compressor rotors and machines for making them of various kinds. I would be highly surprised if they have anyone still working there who knows anything useful about any of their general purpose machine tools.

    They did have some old machine tools in their reception at one time - I vaguely remember an antique lathe and they also had a small mill engine on display at one time, which is now in the Ellenroad museum just up the road. I haven't been there for a good few years so may not be the same now.

    I wish you luck with your re-build, but I have to say that a flat belt drive horizontal would not be my choice for a useful mill. Surely you could find something a bit more modern at scrap prices to re-build?

  6. #6
    timbo917 is offline Plastic
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    Yes that would have been less dificuld but I love the old flatbeld machines.
    Rebuilding these machines is part of the hobby for me.
    Its worth the question to holroyds,maybe they have some kind of
    archive. No harm in asking I think.

  7. #7
    thermite is offline Diamond
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    Quote Originally Posted by timbo917 View Post
    Yes that would have been less dificuld but I love the old flatbeld machines.
    +1 Much easier than first appears to deal with.

    Flat-belt material, glue, metal coupling are still available. PolyVee belts have been used on unaltered sheaves. There is material enough in many to cut micro-grooves, but not conventional Vee-belt grooves. Others can be skimmed, fitted with a shrunk-on steel 'tire' cut from heavy-wall tubing, THEN grooved for PolyVee. IOW - solving the power transmission challenge is not at all hard, faithful to original OR upgraded.

    And ... many are the modest horizontals that can pull a cutter and cut that would leave a typical BP mill of twice their mass and HP howling and shaking like a hound-dog shitting chicken bone.

    All they ask of one is setup skill, wise use of clamping, and a measure of patience.

    Bill
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  8. #8
    timbo917 is offline Plastic
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    Hey Bill,I was thinking in the same direction. I never worked
    on a horizontal mil before but I can see it has more potention as a vertical mill allone.
    It al comes to setup an clamping as you said.

  9. #9
    Tyrone Shoelaces is offline Titanium
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    Not for me Timbo, give me a vertical mill any day. I worked on horizontals as an apprentice and they bored me to tears. Regards Tyrone.

  10. #10
    thermite is offline Diamond
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    Quote Originally Posted by timbo917 View Post
    Hey Bill,I was thinking in the same direction. I never worked
    on a horizontal mil before but I can see it has more potention as a vertical mill allone.
    It al comes to setup an clamping as you said.
    There is, of course the common addition of a vertical head - preferably independently motored and high-mounted - exactly what the BP and a half-dozen others began life as.

    Configuring a vertical as horizontal, OTOH, is not only much more difficult, it gives up so much as to be seldom done.

    Best advantage of these smaller horizontals for smallholders, though, is that they are low enough mass and floorprint to be put onto skates with jack-down pads, shoved over in the corner out of the way when not in-use, pulled out and positioned optimally only when they ARE needed.

    That is done with a BP now and then also, but few who do it end up moving them very often, so do not gain as much for the significantly greater fabrication effort.

    Larger shop is generally better served by having one or more of each..


    Bill

  11. #11
    timbo917 is offline Plastic
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    In school I learned to mill on a vertical machine but I don't
    have much experience. I left school and joined the belgian navy. Did not touched
    a milling machine since. Now that I made a career change and am more at home I want to
    install me a small machine shop with vintage machines. I think for the occasional milling that
    I wil do I wil mannage. It also came with a wooden box with about 80 or so mills in it. It was so heavy
    I could not pick it up allone.

  12. #12
    Tyrone Shoelaces is offline Titanium
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    Well have fun with it matey, it's better than spending your time drinking Belgian beers in the bar. You can leave that to me. Regards Tyrone.
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  13. #13
    thermite is offline Diamond
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tyrone Shoelaces View Post
    Well have fun with it matey, it's better than spending your time drinking Belgian beers in the bar. You can leave that to me. Regards Tyrone.
    Ye'll have to cross the water to find 'em. Stella sure ain't it. The Belgians keep the GOOD stuff closer to home.

    Even so, finding 'em takes dedication, as about 350 of their legendary 400 beers are dreck.

    Sorting is a tough job, but somebody has to do it. And there's your retirement a'calling.

    jhruska likes this.

  14. #14
    Tyrone Shoelaces is offline Titanium
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    I'm lucky matey, my local bar stocks quite a few. " Leffe " and " Hoegarden "on draught to name just two. Plus a good range of bottled Belgian ales. Most are to my taste but the Lambic's aren't. Regards Tyrone.

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    thermite is offline Diamond
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tyrone Shoelaces View Post
    I'm lucky matey, my local bar stocks quite a few. " Leffe " and " Hoegarden "on draught to name just two. Plus a good range of bottled Belgian ales. Most are to my taste but the Lambic's aren't. Regards Tyrone.
    I'm luckier yet.

    A local supermart has Speckled Hen, Bishop's Finger, and - my favourite - Marsdens' Pedigree, among many others, including an excellent Rooski 'Baltika #9' from St. Petersberg at about half their price.

    Living close to the US Gaspital, between Gummint Fat Cats with our tax money to burn, and the embassy's burning THEIR populace's money, there are other stores that carry almost any beer in the world.

    Trick is to ration meself. Hard ration.. 'bout one bottle a fortnight.

    Reached an age where it takes me all night to do .. what I used to.. do all night.


  16. #16
    partsproduction is offline Aluminum
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    With an old horizontal you can set up various sized cutters known distances apart on the arbor, all the better if they are all the same diameter. If you have the room the mill set up like that will make a fine and productive keying machine, and you can use a vertical for all the other milling.

    Then you get a vise that centers, that is the front and back jaws move on RH and LH screw threads so no matter what diameter the shaft you set in it the shaft is on the same center. Now you have one heck of a powerful shaft keying setup.

    Put a 2" diameter shaft in, go to the correct cutter width which is exactly 2" away from the next larger one, cut your key, then put in a 3" shaft and go to the right width cutter, etc. A "sled" mill (Standard mill cutter) will cut a keyseat much faster than an endmill.

    I worked in a sawmill machine shop where I had the pleasure of deep drilling with a horizontal, not something I would recommend to friends. I hated that B&S flat belt mill, and it was all we had.

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