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  1. #1
    mikeg123 is offline Plastic
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    Default Yale Towne Chain Hoist

    I have an old Yale Towne screw geared chain hoist. Can anyone tell me how old it could be, maybe what it's worth? See photos... Mike G.
    Last edited by mikeg123; 11-15-2010 at 06:56 AM. Reason: added photos

  2. #2
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    Mikeg123,

    I can't see the photos, only two red x's.

    My prediction is that this post is going to result in a lengthy and very productivethread about safety, OSHA regs, and related topics.

    JRR

  3. #3
    Bret Rochotte is offline Cast Iron
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    Default Yale hoist

    Hello;

    I paid $0.30/lb for a good Yale spur gear 2 ton hoist and trolly at a scrap yard. I thought that was a great deal then I have seen the same one at auctions since then for around $20. I suspect the one you have falls into that price range. New ones are available for comparison, for a lot more.

    Hoist, Chain, 2T, 10Ft Lift - Manual Chain Hoists - Hoist Winch and Rigging - Material Handling : Grainger Industrial Supply


    WA Crane and Hoist Company: Your source for bridge cranes, hoists and conveyors

    Bret

  4. #4
    Bruce Johnson is offline Stainless
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    The old Yale (and Yale & Towne) screw-style manual hoists were made for a long time, from roughly 1900 (?) up into the 1950's. I've seen them listed in magazines and catalogs all through those years. I don't think that they have any serial numbers or easy ways to tell the age. I have two of them, a 1/2T and a 1T, plus several other models of old Yale manual hoists.

    They're neat old pieces of history to go along with our antique machines, but you have to be very cautious about using them for lifting real, dangerous loads. You simply don't know its history. If it was ever, during its 50-100 year life, overloaded beyond its rating, then it may have internal fractures that could cause it to fail. Modern manual hoists have built-in overload clutches, but they didn't back then.

    So the value is....not much, except to a few antique machinery collectors like us. I paid less than $50 each for mine. I wanted them mostly as decoration for my shop, to add "atmosphere". I'll use them for some light lifting, but nothing close to their rated capacity.

    When I need to really lift a ton, I use a relatively new Yale chain hoist which has the brake and overload clutches.

  5. #5
    reggie_obe is offline Titanium
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    "maybe what it's worth?", it's only worth as much as someone else will pay for it. As for its utility or desirability, I have a similar 1/2 ton hoist, but always grab the aluminum C&M when I need to temporarily hang a hoist somewhere.

  6. #6
    Rick Rowlands's Avatar
    Rick Rowlands is offline Titanium
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    I can't seem to be able to give these old hoists away. I keep acquiring more. Never paid for any of them either.

    The weak link in a chain hoist is the hook. IF the hook looks like it should and not bent outward, then you are good to go. As with any lifting situation, don't stand under the load and don't stand where the load can pin you up against anything. That goes for a $20 Yale or a $1,000 CM. Be aware of your surroundings, your limitations, and don't be bullshitting when your attention should be on the task at hand.

  7. #7
    Bruce Johnson is offline Stainless
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    That's interesting information about the hooks, Rick. I didn't know that. That gives me a little more confidence in using my old Yales. Is there any actual inspection standard, such as a maximum allowable gap for a particular size hook? Was that how they were tested and evaluated in the field?

    As I understand it, Yale offered three basic types of manual chain hoists (in the smaller sizes anyway). They are the Differential Chain Blocks, the Screw-Geared Chain Blocks, and the Spur-Geared Chain Blocks. There's a couple pages of info on them all in a 1931 English Brothers Machinery catalog that I have. I have examples of each of the types in my back shed collection. They each have different strengths and weaknesses.

  8. #8
    Rick Rowlands's Avatar
    Rick Rowlands is offline Titanium
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    http://www.cmworks.com/Public/704/Ya...%20-%20243.pdf
    Look on Page 5. This is for the type BB hoists. Other manuals can be found here:
    Columbus McKinnon - Yale Shaw-Box

  9. #9
    mikeg123 is offline Plastic
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    Default pictures

    Sorry about the pics. I have it on Craigslist, if anyone wants to see pictures.
    EasternCT; For sale; Tools; Chainfall Yale 1 Ton, $65 (STONINGTON, CT)
    I'm getting a feeling that 65 is a bit high. If I remember correctly, I probably paid $20 for it at a yard sale 25 yrs ago. I used it for lifting outboards (200 lbs) and small block chevy engines, so I never did put too much weight on it. Thanks fo everyone's input. Mike G.

  10. #10
    Bruce Johnson is offline Stainless
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    Thanks for posting that, Rick! Yep, page 5 spells out the allowable dimensions for the hooks. Also, good factory info on how to disassemble and lube the spur-gear hoists.

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