Handwheels falling off
Close
Login to Your Account
Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    California
    Posts
    54
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    9
    Likes (Received)
    27

    Default Handwheels falling off

    I am not the voice of experience here since I have been the owner operator of a 1969 J-Head Variable Drive Bridgeport mill for about three days now.

    Why is it that every time I try to rotate a handwheel on this mill that it has to fall off the machine? I raise the knee, the handwheel comes loose and I have to muscle it back on. I try to move the quill feed handle and it is loose. It pops out of its keeper. Same for the fine feed handwheel. I have owned two cheap Chinese mills and at least their controls would stay in place. Well, not all the time, but I don't understand why this Bridgeport has to be so fussy. What am I doing wrong here?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    Posts
    17,148
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    7288
    Likes (Received)
    5376

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by John S01 View Post
    I am not the voice of experience here since I have been the owner operator of a 1969 J-Head Variable Drive Bridgeport mill for about three days now.

    Why is it that every time I try to rotate a handwheel on this mill that it has to fall off the machine? I raise the knee, the handwheel comes loose and I have to muscle it back on. I try to move the quill feed handle and it is loose. It pops out of its keeper. Same for the fine feed handwheel. I have owned two cheap Chinese mills and at least their controls would stay in place. Well, not all the time, but I don't understand why this Bridgeport has to be so fussy. What am I doing wrong here?
    Not "wrong". They were meant to be easily removable, knee (a crank handle, not wheel) most of all. Balanced levers the other two. Anything can get out of whack, Bubba does a monkey-patch, or NO patch? May need some attention. Not a Bridgeport vs Chinese design fault atall.

    After all it ain't brand-new, is it? Take a closer look at it, see what needs what.
    Last edited by thermite; 02-14-2018 at 04:06 AM.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Iowa
    Posts
    9,838
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3025
    Likes (Received)
    3682

    Default

    OK, a couple of things. If the head has variable speed, it's a 2J, not a J. The vintage of your mill suggests an early 2J so it's probably 1.5hp. So, the correct nomenclature would be 2J-1 1/2.

    You also say "handwheels", there is usually only one handwheel on a BP. That's the fine feed on the head.

    Please go here and download a current manual: KneeMills.com - Knee Mill Documentation
    This way, we can all be on the same "page" and help you find your problems. You might also find that you are missing parts.
    JR

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    156
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    17
    Likes (Received)
    55

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by John S01 View Post
    I am not the voice of experience here since I have been the owner operator of a 1969 J-Head Variable Drive Bridgeport mill for about three days now.

    Why is it that every time I try to rotate a handwheel on this mill that it has to fall off the machine? I raise the knee, the handwheel comes loose and I have to muscle it back on. I try to move the quill feed handle and it is loose. It pops out of its keeper. Same for the fine feed handwheel. I have owned two cheap Chinese mills and at least their controls would stay in place. Well, not all the time, but I don't understand why this Bridgeport has to be so fussy. What am I doing wrong here?
    If I'm not mistaken, knee, quill feed, and fine feed controls are all designed to be removable. There should be no muscling of any of them required and no excessive force required. Give your new mill a good cleaning. For the knee crank, gunk gets into the castellations and stops the handle from fully seating. Then the crank can easily slip loose.

    In use, I use the knee crank to get to position, then I lock the knee and reverse the crank handle so its out of the way. Its designed like that.

  5. Likes thermite liked this post

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •