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Thread: bridgeport table removal

  1. #1
    learning-curve is offline Aluminum
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    Default bridgeport table removal

    I am far enough along with the rebuild that I need to remove table, can it be done by 1 person, I do not have table lift but I can build a wood table to slide mill table on to. maybe with a little assist with engine hoist?
    what method has everyone used removing table?

    I have no intentions of removing knee

  2. #2
    abarnsley is offline Titanium
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    If you have an engine hoist and a table, it is no problem...

    Use T slots and lifting rings in T nuts.. Clamped stops on either side of lifting ring, so they can't slide, and dump table.

    Table is ~300 lbs..

    Go slow, remove gibs first. BE CAREFULL.

  3. #3
    CWB
    CWB is offline Hot Rolled
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    I use a small 2'x2' "table" that I made from scrap lumber. Simply adjust the knee to the table height and slide it right over. I was rather surprised how easy it was to remove (20 mins maybe), and SWMBO helped me carry it across the shop several times. My 9x42 table cant top 200 lbs, I can almost lift it myself, and SWMBO is a tiny lil her.
    jhruska likes this.

  4. #4
    jhruska's Avatar
    jhruska is online now Stainless
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    CWB describes it. Any table solid and well braced will do. Sheet metal or old counter top so the Bridgeport table will slide across. Have it stout enough so you can flip the Bridgeport table over for cleaning. The knee is the 'lift' table.
    John

  5. #5
    hitandmiss is offline Stainless
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    I posted this early this year:

    1. Remove the DRO if present and everything from table top.
    2. Loosten table gib.
    3. Remove the crank and bearing from the right side
    If there is a power feed remove the assembly.
    4. Remove the lead screw from the left side.
    5. Set up a set of sawhorses with a plank wide enough for the dovetail.
    A metal die cart works well also.
    6. Crank the table up or down to the level of the saw horses.
    7. Push table onto saw horses, adjust up or down as needed.
    This may require an assistant.
    8. Flip table over so ways are on top.
    everything is exposed for cleaning.
    9. Keep track of any shims behind the gib.

    Be sure to clean the drilled hole from the table nut down to the crossfeed nut as this is how the crossfeed gets it's lube. It is best to remove both nuts for this.

    I would NOT use a drill press to spin the leadscrew to clean it. A lathe with a center in the free end is much safer.

    MSC stocks nuts and many other parts and is much easier to deal with than the outsourced Hardinge parts people.

    I use a medium india 6" long triangle stone to stone off gunk and burrs. Keep the stone wet with mineral spirits prevents plugging it up.

    Bill

  6. #6
    J Henricksen is offline Stainless
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    Wheels under the small table makes life even easier. I like a stock picking cart to slide the tables onto. Pull the lead screw and end supports first. take the screw off towards the left. Remove the gib while the table is centered in its stroke., take the table off to the left also.

  7. #7
    bridgeport's Avatar
    bridgeport is offline Cast Iron
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    I use a hydraulic lift table for this. I think harbor freight sells them, and they are a great back saver. My troyke cross slide rotabs live on them when they are not on my mills.

  8. #8
    learning-curve is offline Aluminum
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    Quote Originally Posted by hitandmiss View Post
    I posted this early this year:

    1. Remove the DRO if present and everything from table top.
    2. Loosen table gib.
    3. Remove the crank and bearing from the right side
    If there is a power feed remove the assembly.
    4. Remove the lead screw from the left side.
    5. Set up a set of sawhorses with a plank wide enough for the dovetail.
    A metal die cart works well also.
    6. Crank the table up or down to the level of the saw horses.
    7. Push table onto saw horses, adjust up or down as needed.
    This may require an assistant.
    8. Flip table over so ways are on top.
    everything is exposed for cleaning.
    9. Keep track of any shims behind the gib.

    Be sure to clean the drilled hole from the table nut down to the crossfeed nut as this is how the crossfeed gets it's lube. It is best to remove both nuts for this.

    I would NOT use a drill press to spin the leadscrew to clean it. A lathe with a center in the free end is much safer.

    MSC stocks nuts and many other parts and is much easier to deal with than the outsourced Hardinge parts people.

    I use a medium india 6" long triangle stone to stone off gunk and burrs. Keep the stone wet with mineral spirits prevents plugging it up.

    Bill
    thank you those directions will be most helpful

  9. #9
    hitandmiss is offline Stainless
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    learning-curve,

    Thanks.

    Please post a followup after you are done with the job. Noting any updates needed.

    Plan on the table weighing 200-250 Lbs. It will be less, but it is better, being over prepared than not.

    Bill

  10. #10
    SteveF is offline Stainless
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    When I had my BP apart I took the step pulley head and the 9 x 42 table (with lead screw and one handle) and put them on a scale. Don't remember which was which but one was 205 lbs and the other was 210 (and 5 lbs is close enough).

    Steve

  11. #11
    rons is offline Stainless
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    Quote Originally Posted by learning-curve View Post
    what method has everyone used removing table?
    A Kennedy rolling cart can be used for this kind of thing. I used some plywood and
    2x4's on top of the rolling cart. Then elevate the knee to the matching height and
    the table can be moved onto the cart. Nothing will get damaged and no lifting will
    be required. Simple and easy.

  12. #12
    Avrgjoe's Avatar
    Avrgjoe is offline Cast Iron
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    Kinda along the same lines, reading this thread made me wonder about having my table ground to clean up the surface? I have wondered about doing this and was curious if it was a viable solution to a rough table surface? Removing the table was one thing I was dreading but according to this thread it don't sound so bad. Makes me want to revisit the idea of having the table ground flat and true....any thoughts and or advice?

    Joe

  13. #13
    redlee's Avatar
    redlee is offline Hot Rolled
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    Default

    I used a 45 Gal. Steel Drum.

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