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  1. #1
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    I am looking for the hole pattern on the base so I can lag to floor. Thanks

  2. #2
    richie k is offline Aluminum
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    If you mean the bolt hole centres that secure the machine to the floor. wide 508 mm centres,front to back centres 724 mm. Outside measureement of base ,wide 610mm, front to back 921mm. these measurement are for UK built machines,USA build may differ

  3. #3
    L Vanice is online now Diamond
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    I suppose the hole pattern will depend on whether you are asking about a Hardinge or Bridgeport mill, and what model.

    Larry

  4. #4
    SteelCutter's Avatar
    SteelCutter is offline Hot Rolled
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    Hmmmmmmmmmmm thinking maybe a transfer punch and smack it with a hammer and maybe leave marks on the floor and maybe drill holes on top of the marks and maybe throw lag bolts in the holes and, well, get the picture? thats how we do it in BOONie town and seems to hold stuff in place forevahhhhhhh!!!

    SteelCutter

  5. #5
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    SteelCutter: that would be ok if I had the floor pored but wanted to put the laggs in the new floor as it's pored.

  6. #6
    SteelCutter's Avatar
    SteelCutter is offline Hot Rolled
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    OHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH, did I miss that in your original post? My most sincere apology!

    SteelCutter

  7. #7
    Jim Caudill is offline Stainless
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    Based on my experience setting anchor bolts for outside walls when pouring a footer, I'd say the chance of this working out are very slim. Your best bet would be to make a wooden pattern that matches your hole pattern; then glue some thick blocks over the holes to simulate the mill base (providing depth control as well as making the bolts plumb). Set the whole affair in place when finishing the floor. In general, anchor bolts are strong, but not very precise in their alignment. My advice is worth what you paid for it. Good luck.

  8. #8
    SteelCutter's Avatar
    SteelCutter is offline Hot Rolled
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    I say we pour concrete and anchor lag bolts later!!!

    but than again, like jim says ""My advice is worth what you paid for it. Good luck.""

    SteelCutter

  9. #9
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    Forgot to mention rad. heat will be in the floor.

  10. #10
    SteelCutter's Avatar
    SteelCutter is offline Hot Rolled
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    Hey, how about we bury the base of the mill when we pour the concrete!! leave an 8' x 8' hole in front of it for work space, or a trench all the way around it!! I can see it now!! it will never move!

    my brain is hurting from all these ideas!!

    SteelCutter

  11. #11
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    I understand why you leave in Ill. Go I.U

  12. #12
    Jim Caudill is offline Stainless
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    Study up on that radiant floor heat, and make sure it is installed exactly according to plan. My car wash has it (uses 500,000 btu boiler) and it is so messed up, I can't afford to run it. No insulation under the slab, poor layout of tubing, no marking of circuits (I have about 17), tubing set too deep in the slab: you name it and I've got it. My wash was built when natural gas was about 1/6th the cost of today. Back then, much of this was just overlooked, now it's killing me every month.

  13. #13
    AAFRadio is offline Cast Iron
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    The classic way of doing this is to use plastic accordion sleeves for the bolt heads that allow some movement after the concrete cures. See http://finecloud.com/wilsonanchorpoint/technical.htm for examples. Frankly, unless you plan on putting engine blocks on the end of the table and rotating the head around to do something on them, you don't really need anchor bolts in a Bridgeport. It has a fairly low center of gravity with normal workpieces on the table.

    Best wishes,
    Mike

  14. #14
    Limy Sami is offline Diamond
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    We've got em over here so I assume you have too, (probably ''Redheads'' thinking about it)........... through hole concrete anchors, pour your floor, you know where the mills going so you won't have heating lines there anyway, position mill, drill the chuffin holes and hammer the bolts in. then tighten them! that way it's gotta fit.

    Tip, if you use these anchors, drill right through the slab, then if you move the machine all you do is hammer the bolts down out the way.

  15. #15
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    Question: is it that important that a Bpt (or clone) be bolted to the floor?

    The only good reason I can think of is so it doesn't fall over during an earthquake. As long as the base isn't rocking on the concrete, you should be in fine shape.

    The thing that would be impossible to recover from was if you had an odd job where the ram needed to move closer to the wall, found a shaping head, or wanted to adjust the shop's layout...I mean even by 6" to squeeze in another ______ (fill in the blank).

  16. #16
    scraper is offline Aluminum
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    good point matt, i have never seen a bridgeport bolted to the floor ( except on ships) and could never think of a reasone why i would want one bolted down ( ecxept on ships) but i can think of a number of reasons why i wouldnt want one bolted down. i would pour the floor and put the machine in place and run it and later if you decide that you just have to have it bolted down you can do it steelcutters way. if you are a newbe i can see why you might think this is a good idea but i dont think it is and if you are not a newbe and you actually have good reasons for wanting it bolted down tell me so i can learn something new.

  17. #17
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    I worked in a toolroom of about 300 die makers and we had 20+ bridgeport and other brand of mills , all were lagged down and leveled.

  18. #18
    AAFRadio is offline Cast Iron
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    In a large production environment, you would do just that. You never know what you might have to put on the table, and time being money they play it safe and plan for all eventualities. I know of one instance where a guy mounted a Chevy engine block to one end of the table and rotated the ram at 45 degrees to do some drilling. The 400lb. offset combination was enough to send it over when he moved the table out a little way. Whether you will ever need to machine something with that kind of configuration is something only you can decide. I think I'd take the easy route and not mount it. If you ever get in the above situation at a future date, you can always lift the mill and put a couple of 4"x4" posts under it to temorarily widen the support base. That's all it needs.

    - Mike

  19. #19
    scraper is offline Aluminum
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    well i did learn something. in a senario like aafradio describes i guess it makes sence. i think i would still pour the floor first and then transfer the holes. or make a wooden or metel frame that matches the holes in the base and put it in the floor when i pour it

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