Best Tool for 2D/3D Contour Milling
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    Default Best Tool for 2D/3D Contour Milling

    Good evening,
    I am programming from CAD using both Fusion 360 and Inventor. I want to do contour milling but not sure if I should use 2D or 3D and not sure about the type of end mill to use. Thank you in advance for any help anyone can provide.

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    Quote Originally Posted by cmmpro1 View Post
    Good evening,
    I am programming from CAD using both Fusion 360 and Inventor. I want to do contour milling but not sure if I should use 2D or 3D and not sure about the type of end mill to use. Thank you in advance for any help anyone can provide.
    First more info is needed like what the part looks like, then at what stage are you asking about first toolpath for roughing or a finish path around the part???

    because either can work depending on what the part looks like

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    Quote Originally Posted by cmmpro1 View Post
    Good evening,
    I am programming from CAD using both Fusion 360 and Inventor. I want to do contour milling but not sure if I should use 2D or 3D and not sure about the type of end mill to use. Thank you in advance for any help anyone can provide.
    2.5D typically z moves alone stops then x and y moves
    .
    size of end mill or carbide insert cutter depends on part shape. you might need only 0.2" width removed but if you can run 2 or 2.5" dia carbide insert cutter at fewer depth passes and bigger width passes at higher 30-40 ipm feed its often faster.
    .
    most cad cam will give a rough time it takes for machining. helps to decide what tools to use

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    Default 2D/3D Milling

    Quote Originally Posted by len_1962 View Post
    First more info is needed like what the part looks like, then at what stage are you asking about first toolpath for roughing or a finish path around the part???

    because either can work depending on what the part looks like
    The part is a connecting rod. I want to do this for both roughing and finishing. I have attached the connecting rod to this post.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails connecting_rod_assembly_2017-nov-21_10-13-31pm-000_home_jpg.jpg  

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    Quote Originally Posted by cmmpro1 View Post
    The part is a connecting rod. I want to do this for both roughing and finishing. I have attached the connecting rod to this post.
    99% of milling you use rougher to do roughing then use a different finisher tool to make a finish pass. typically rougher leave a bad finish.
    .
    some parts you use chucking blocks of specific sizes to help hold it when remove chucking stock. part that was in the vise. other times you use soft jaws with shape cut into jaws to help hold parts

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    Thank you!!! I am going to keep working at this until its correct. I am normally a CMM Programmer and when I was a machinist, I was working with Screw Machines. So this is fairly new to me. I was asked to do this because I have an understanding of the coding.

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    Quote Originally Posted by cmmpro1 View Post
    Thank you!!! I am going to keep working at this until its correct. I am normally a CMM Programmer and when I was a machinist, I was working with Screw Machines. So this is fairly new to me. I was asked to do this because I have an understanding of the coding.
    .
    many parts are not as easy as some assume. usually you make a part. then when you make more you might try different things to reduce machining times. often limits are what part can take before chattering or vibration causes finish and tolerance problems.
    .
    some parts are held by the bores while finish cuts are taken. or they are held by tabs left on for machining (something to hold on too) and cut off when at the end of machining

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    This part is held in a specially made fixture for the machining process. The way I see it, I have to machine the top, then the bottom so this will be a two op program.

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    Quote Originally Posted by cmmpro1 View Post
    This part is held in a specially made fixture for the machining process. The way I see it, I have to machine the top, then the bottom so this will be a two op program.
    many parts are 3 or more ops.
    .
    1st op you machine spots to hold it better and rough it out
    2nd op holding it at the chucking spots machine it out and finish those sides
    3rd op finish machine what the 1st op left rough machined.
    .
    often you take extra ops reaching different sides and to take part warpage out. many parts when vise released go bong and are curved shaped. warpage and distortion can require many rechucks at lower torque to remove the warpage

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    Wow, there's a lot I need to keep in mind. I am sure I need to run this by my manager. He thinks I should just program it and its done. Although I am not going to be setting this up and running it, I need to know this to better help the guy/gal running my parts.

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    Quote Originally Posted by cmmpro1 View Post
    Wow, there's a lot I need to keep in mind. I am sure I need to run this by my manager. He thinks I should just program it and its done. Although I am not going to be setting this up and running it, I need to know this to better help the guy/gal running my parts.
    .
    programming is the easy part. normally deciding how to setup, what tools to use, depth width pass amounts and feeds and speeds effects things. warpage effects things, tolerances effects things
    .
    same part can take 1 hour or 10 hours. for example if they want bores to +/-.0001" tolerances and bores parallel or part not warped to <.0002" that can add considerable time and costs. obviously no boring bars if you circular mill you are more limited on holding a true circle tolerance as out of roundness can be too much
    .
    often saving money not having part stress relieved first can double or triple machining times
    .
    often boss just wants one made then you determine if quality needs improving and time to machine needs to be reduced. little thing like scrapping a part and needing another piece to try again often happens on a 1st part run. obviously no extra metal you need to be more cautious to not scrap the part

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