Setting zero using CAM
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  1. #1
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    Question Setting zero using CAM

    Good evening everyone,
    What is the best practice for setting the zero in a CAM program? I have always began with the stock box point then move the zero as I remove metal. is that the best way? I was talking with someone and he told me that he sets the zero to the print for the part to begin with and never move it. Is that a good way to do it? Thank you in advance for any info on this subject.

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    Not completely clear on what you're trying to ask, but...

    Typically I position my Work Zero to a feature on the part ( whatever that might be ) in CAM, and during setup I touch off on the edges ( whatever they might be ) and then
    shift the work coord. according to what the CAM file is set to.

    Let's say I'm milling a 1x1x1 block with a 1/2" hole in the middle, and I choose the center of the hole to be X/Y 0, and the raw material happens to be a 1.25 x 1.25 x 1.25 block.
    During setup I pick up perhaps the U/L corner of the stock in X Y and Z, then I shift the X by .625, Y by -.625 and Z by .01 for the work offset location.

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    I'm not sure what you are asking but set your zero in the cam at the same place you are going to set it when setting up your part. I know that sounds like "duh", but some people make things more complicated then they need to be. (hope that makes sense)

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    I set zero one time and and likely never move it. If restarting a program nasty things can happen.

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    I work that zero is always set to the finished top or bottom face, not stock.

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    Quote Originally Posted by cmmpro1 View Post
    Good evening everyone,
    What is the best practice for setting the zero in a CAM program? I have always began with the stock box point then move the zero as I remove metal. is that the best way? I was talking with someone and he told me that he sets the zero to the print for the part to begin with and never move it. Is that a good way to do it? Thank you in advance for any info on this subject.
    There are a lot of factors that go into setting zero. Type of work you do, quantity,size, how the part is being held, etc....
    Typically I set the Datum center of stock in X and Y with Z being top of finished part (FOR THE 1ST OP).
    Then I move the X and Y datum to a back corner for the other ops.
    The above is for flat stock.

    For 4th and 5th axis work, the Z zero is ALWAYS center of rotation in 4th axis stuff.
    Pick a way that works and stick with it. Otherwise your operators will be pulling their hair out trying to figure out your datums every day.

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    All depends on the part where I set the zero, but once set I never move it.

    most of the time it is in the center of the part X and Y, Z may be at the top, middle or bottom.

    if it's a multi sided part, first side may have the zeros at the upper right corner top of stock, then second side might be a feature on the part or if it has soft jaw pockets then they drive the zeros.

    you are going to have to figure this out too what best works for you, trial and error, sorry but this is what we all have gone thru, my way may not be his way and his way may no be your way.....

    10 people have 10 ways to do it, of these 10 ways maybe 20% are the same, so answer will very on this.

    so YES, NO, MAYBE is my final answer.


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