20x48 Pacemaker at auction in Chicago ending in 1.5 hours - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    acro quoted
    QUOTE: $2,375 TRUCKING
    STORAGE: $50/MONTH

    seems pretty high on the trucking quote.

  2. #22
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    If you can post it to the uk I ll take it off your hands

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by sirus20x6 View Post
    acro quoted
    QUOTE: $2,375 TRUCKING
    STORAGE: $50/MONTH

    seems pretty high on the trucking quote.
    If they have to mobilize just to move that lathe, IE they aren't already on site. That dosent sound too bad.

    I paid 600 an hour, for a rigger to load a 40x10' planer mill. They were already on site becuase of the auction, other wise id have had to pay their mobilization fee on top of that. Took about 1.5 hours to rig the machine out of the building and get it loaded. Was a very technical move, I paid them $1200 very happily.

    Edit, is that just trucking or loading it on a truck and moving it?

  4. #24
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    That trailer rental is looking better and better.

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  6. #25
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    I can almost taste the chips

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  8. #26
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    Have you got enough electrical to feed it, she is likely hungry....................what about a twenty horse motor?

  9. #27
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    not currently, but it will take me a long time to polish her up, and I'm going to be moving in a few months

  10. #28
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    I'm glad to see that you hired someone to do your rigging. That's not a machine that you want to rig out by yourself if you don't have any experience moving machinery.

    That's a really nice looking lathe. The best part is that you ended up with a ton of accessories for it. That alone will save you a bunch of cash and time looking for them.I have a 16x54 Pacemaker that's a real beast. That 20" heavy duty is even more so. These lathes, as old as they are, are still light years beyond any new Asian import that is currently available.

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  12. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by sirus20x6 View Post
    I can almost taste the chips
    Ever run a lathe this size and HP?

    Those tasty chips also have the smell of BBQ'ed meat, many a day.

    Mind yer deflector shielding and rig for flood coolant. She's used to being hot and wet.

    "Coz the BBQ'ed meat in play is yer own left arm, one red welt after another. DAMHIKT.

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  14. #30
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    Yeah I am not qualified to move this thing more than from one side of a garage to the other (with lots of help). I haven't even broken open the case of goodies

  15. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by thermite View Post
    Ever run a lathe this size and HP?

    Those tasty chips also have the smell of BBQ'ed meat, many a day.

    Mind yer deflector shielding and rig for flood coolant. She's used to being hot and wet.

    "Coz the BBQ'ed meat in play is yer own left arm, one red welt after another. DAMHIKT.


    Thermite makes a very valid point on safety. Obviously I don't know what your experience level is but if this is your first lathe please be ultra careful when you're using this. A lathe of this size has the capability of either seriously injuring you or killing you if you get caught up in it. If you have a strong stomach do a google search for lathe accidents and click on images. Don't do it while you're eating.

  16. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by thermite View Post
    Ever run a lathe this size and HP?

    Those tasty chips also have the smell of BBQ'ed meat, many a day.

    Mind yer deflector shielding and rig for flood coolant. She's used to being hot and wet.

    "Coz the BBQ'ed meat in play is yer own left arm, one red welt after another. DAMHIKT.
    Get one down an open necked shirt and you'll know about it. Or on your tongue or eyelid.

    Regards Tyrone.

  17. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tyrone Shoelaces View Post
    Get one down an open necked shirt and you'll know about it. Or on your tongue or eyelid.

    Regards Tyrone.
    Yeah.....that's called the "Not-So-Happy Dance!"

  18. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tyrone Shoelaces View Post
    Get one down an open necked shirt and you'll know about it. Or on your tongue or eyelid.

    Regards Tyrone.
    Forehead, yazz. Shirt or beltline, now and then. Old as the rescued-from-loo-decor Niles & c. were, Galis DID at least insist on the real-armour-glass-polycarb-not HEAVY safety glasses with the swing-out wire gauze side seals.

    Eyelid not.

    Tongue? Maybe over a half of Pedigree some fine day?



    I still have my last issue, 1965, BTW. Can't see much through 'em. I save them perched atop the "Seniour" Kennedy as a reminder.

    That every single chip on that grade of glass required enough force as could have trashed my last set of eyeballs.

    And still could do yet, any time I get stoopid and do without.

  19. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tyrone Shoelaces View Post
    Get one down an open necked shirt and you'll know about it. Or on your tongue or eyelid.

    Regards Tyrone.
    The worst is in your ear! I can take some pain, but mother of god a hot chip or welding berry in the ear canal is over my limit!

    I use a large sized steel cookie sheet to deflect the chips when taking lots of material off.

    That lathe is going to look a lot bigger in your garage. I hope that's not your only lathe and you have a smaller one. That's big enough to be real cumbersome for anything under a couple inches.

  20. #36
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    Like this: I love this one from 1943...ap-overall.jpgap-spindlespeeds.jpgap-war-.jpgapbelts.jpg

    Quote Originally Posted by johnoder View Post
    Biggies, like Matt's, were sold with either of these options - 800, 1200 and 1600 top end

    "Little" ones - including the medium duty 20 - made out of a 16" - were sold with either of these options - 1000, 1500 and 2000

    I suppose - like L&S Model X and Power Turn - you could buy more HP with the higher speed options

    They actually wanted them to remove the normal gobs of metal at those higher speeds

    Biggies have EIGHT drive belts, the little guys only FIVE

  21. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Garwood View Post
    The worst is in your ear! I can take some pain, but mother of god a hot chip or welding berry in the ear canal is over my limit!
    Ain't but the start of that "good old days were anything-BUT" vignette.

    Ears don't seem to heal as fast as other parts, can bug a body for a helluva long while, thereafter.


  22. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by thermite View Post
    Ever run a lathe this size and HP?

    Those tasty chips also have the smell of BBQ'ed meat, many a day.

    Mind yer deflector shielding and rig for flood coolant. She's used to being hot and wet.

    "Coz the BBQ'ed meat in play is yer own left arm, one red welt after another. DAMHIKT.
    My girlfriend knows that ive been running a big Manual lathe from the burns on my neck!

  23. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by MCritchley View Post
    My girlfriend knows that ive been running a big Manual lathe from the burns on my neck!
    Ummh.. chips... swarf... work clothing.. workboots.. the "passenger effect".. automobiles.. carpets...toweling .. lingerie ..and bedclothes.. can serve-up a far, far less welcome form of right sharp evidence. DAMHIKT.

    Not a BAD move, long-haul, our trade, to put a bespoke washer-dryer on-board your partic'lar ship and keep it all as firmly segregated as can be. Only takes ONE sharp curl of steel in her dainty smalls, bra, towels, or bedsheets, and she'll not see it as any form of extravagant spend.

    Small capacity bought scratch-n-dent or used-but-good is fine, anyway.

  24. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tyrone Shoelaces View Post
    Get one down an open necked shirt and you'll know about it. Or on your tongue or eyelid.

    Regards Tyrone.
    Luckily in Britain we had thegood sense to put the rack wheel on the right!


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