Results 1 to 6 of 6
Like Tree1Likes
  • 1 Post By Ox

Thread: Anyone using a Harding GD210LP rotary table, opinions?

  1. #1
    Edster is offline Titanium
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    3,052

    Default Anyone using a Harding GD210LP rotary table, opinions?

    I'm looking at a Hardinge Bridgeport GX1000 OSP with a Hardinge GD210LP rotary table.

    Hardinge Inc

    It will have an Okuma motor and be wired as a true 4th axis. Anyone using one of these rotary tables? Opinions?

    It looks real similar to the Haas table, coincidence?

  2. #2
    Edster is offline Titanium
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    3,052

    Default

    Well, I just got our rotary table. It's the GD210LP with A2-5 spindle nose and it's collet ready for a 16C collet also came with a faceplate. It looks like a nicley built rotary so far.



    http://i445.photobucket.com/albums/q...514_111042.jpg

    http://i445.photobucket.com/albums/q...514_111131.jpg

    Anyone else try the Hardinge rotarys?

  3. #3
    Dave K is offline Diamond
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Waukesha, WI
    Posts
    5,733

    Default

    Closest I have is a hardinge 5c collet indexer. Not a true 4th, just a positional indexer. It works like it should is about all I can say. It's not super fast, but it beats nothing at all by a long shot.

  4. #4
    Ox's Avatar
    Ox
    Ox is offline Diamond
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    West Unity, Ohio
    Posts
    16,923

    Default

    I have a "Big 10 Inch" Hardinge table with an A2 nose on it, and it has the 16C closer.

    Mine looks different than those posted above tho.
    Mine was an early model. Mine looks deeper that these, and I don't have the sqr box off to the side. Just a cover for the servo motor.

    This thing it built like a brick $hit house!
    Mine has the stand-alone control box with it. Have not hooked it up to a full 4th application yet.

    I couldn't find any pics already loaded at first, but I did find some finally:





    After setting for a few yrs, I dug it back out to use on the big rotary (slave set-up) and when I plugged it in, it let a wee bit of the magic smoke out. Hardinge sent me a "rebuilt" control box on exchange and life was good. I think the repair cost was fair, I don't recall how much. Can still deal with Hardinge direct on the rotaries!

    Seems like a very stable unit to me.
    But mine is like new, and was only really used for a few hard months, and then put away.




    EDIT:

    Per Daves "not real fast" comment on his 5c:

    I had to shut down the rapids on this thing as it indexed way too fast for the app shown in the mill with the tube.

    As you can see - I have a 12" chuck on the other side that weighs about 100#, and with too fast acc/decc I could get slip inside the tube, messing up any alignment.
    (could ball down too hard on the chuck wrench eh?)

    IMO that this spins like greased lightening for a worm drive!
    I am pretty sure that it is way fatser than the Haas indexer that we had on the sister machine running the same job.


    ----------------

    I am Ox and I approve this h'yah post!
    Last edited by Ox; 05-14-2012 at 09:28 PM.

  5. #5
    Edster is offline Titanium
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    3,052

    Default

    Dang OX thats a big rotary table

    You definatly got me beat when it comes to engine-u-ity What kind of tolerance can you hold with that setup?

    I like the dual chucks in the first pic. What are you doin in that setup couldn't quite make it out from the pic.

    You're rotary looks a little beefier, they are calling the model I have low profile though.

  6. #6
    Ox's Avatar
    Ox
    Ox is offline Diamond
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    West Unity, Ohio
    Posts
    16,923

    Default

    Tol?
    There is very little lash in the worm on the big table. So ....
    These days the big table has it's own servo, and the Hardinge has since been put back on the shelf.


    The dual chucks was for a big job of making swiss cheese out of many different sized tubes, in qtys that seem to have been in 60 and 90's each? All told, we knocked in over 1 million holes in three months on 2 machines. And we had to hit each hole twice. Drill, and then plunge with an endmill to final size. All dry.

    I built the sub chuck spindle. It is an A2-6 and will pass a 4" (or so) tube through the spindle/chuck. (Those bearings aint cheap)

    Holes were 36" long layout, and I had two 30" machines, with a lot of holes needing put in quick, but not a long term job, so I didn't want to go buy 2 or 3 40" machines.... So I built a cpl of shuttle tables to put the whole sh-bang on, and powered it with two 2" air cyls.
    2/3 of the way through the program, the spindle will come down and bump the limit switch that is hiding behind the tube right in the middle of the part. You can see a pc of hot rolled going up from the table there. Then the machine ran the rest of the cycle. When you change the part, you hit the palm button near the rotary table to reset the shuttle. I built 2 of these, and have kept one around. Actually, we had to run some a little later that were a little differ'nt, and they were about 40" long, so I had to take the one back apart and add some longer air cyls to git the added stroke. Job ran great, but not much sleep for a few months. (so what's new eh?)

    I agree, mine does look beefier than the slimline one you have. ...not that I expect it to be an issue...
    Mine weighs prox 200# (w/o the chuck on it) and I wish I knew that before I picked it up out of the crate by hand...


    --------------------------

    Don't miss the Thank You and Good-Bye Tour
    I got my T-shirt!
    Ox
    cnctoolcat likes this.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •