Back up your computer! - Page 2
Close
Login to Your Account
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 21 to 40 of 45
  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Vancouver, WA. USA
    Posts
    2,549
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    523
    Likes (Received)
    1247

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 706jim View Post
    .....But the ancient bubble board last used in 1991 happily had all of the data saved and control was able to be restored.
    The longevity of the bubble memory is astounding. I've seen several instances where using an old bubble board was a quick and painless way to recover a 6, 11, and 12 series control with an aftermarket expanded memory board that failed or the battery died.

    IIRC, it was explained to me that reading and writing to bubble was too slow even back then for routine use. The control read the contents of the bubble into RAM at bootup and that's what the control worked with. The RAM contents would get written back to bubble in the background. There was up to a 300mS delay at power off to allow the control to finish a write cycle.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    GA
    Posts
    548
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1
    Likes (Received)
    87

    Default

    I have all the PCs here back up daily automatically to a NAS using Macrium Reflect, which works great, then I back up the NAS every 2 weeks to a USB drive that is kept in a pelican case off site. No dependence on internet access or another entity for cloud storage. Rotating 2 or more such off site drives is best. Unconnected off site backups in case of hacking, equipment failure or natural disaster. I'd increase the rate of those NAS backups if the loss of 2 weeks of work would be too much.

  3. Likes sfriedberg liked this post
  4. #23
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Northern Mn
    Posts
    351
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    76
    Likes (Received)
    385

    Default

    A couple years back, my wife's hard drive got accidentally re-formatted by one of the kids. As a result, she lost all of the digital family pictures. Needless to say she was very upset. I dug around on the internet and bought a program that could recover data from damaged or erased hard drives. I was skeptical that it would work, but sure enough it brought back all of the jpegs that were stored anywhere on the computer, including the ones in Internet Explorers history... I was expecting a treasure trove of porn mixed in with the family photos. Instead I found all the family pictures and 10,000 pictures of women's shoes... I would have preferred the porn, it turns out my wife likes expensive shoes

  5. Likes Scottl, barbter, Cycle1000 liked this post
  6. #24
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Eastern Massachusetts, USA
    Posts
    3,648
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3468
    Likes (Received)
    3223

    Default

    Reading these horror stories I'm so glad I set the registry keys on my Win 7 machine to prevent forced upgrades to Win 10. These days Microsoft is doing so much questionable stuff during updates that I disabled auto update and use an offline updater that has an updated Do Not Install list for known problematic updates. It's terrible that a company most people once felt they could trust has chosen to behave this way.

    To the OP I recommend buying a USB drive adapter that can read your drive type so after you replace it with a new one you can connect the failing drive and search for data as time allows. I also feel this is the best way to backup to disk as the USB backup drives use proprietary software and if anything goes wrong you have to send them the drive and pay for file recovery. Bare drives are so cheap today a business could buy 2 and use the system I prefer, which is to alternate backups between two drives so if something goes wrong during a backup the other drive will have all but the most recent files. With standard archiving software the files can be compressed for more efficient storage.

  7. #25
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Southeastern US
    Posts
    6,124
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    660
    Likes (Received)
    2470

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Scottl View Post
    Reading these horror stories I'm so glad I set the registry keys on my Win 7 machine to prevent forced upgrades to Win 10. These days Microsoft is doing so much questionable stuff during updates that I disabled auto update and use an offline updater that has an updated Do Not Install list for known problematic updates. It's terrible that a company most people once felt they could trust has chosen to behave this way.

    To the OP I recommend buying a USB drive adapter that can read your drive type so after you replace it with a new one you can connect the failing drive and search for data as time allows. I also feel this is the best way to backup to disk as the USB backup drives use proprietary software and if anything goes wrong you have to send them the drive and pay for file recovery. Bare drives are so cheap today a business could buy 2 and use the system I prefer, which is to alternate backups between two drives so if something goes wrong during a backup the other drive will have all but the most recent files. With standard archiving software the files can be compressed for more efficient storage.
    I don't use "USB backup drives", as per your note, it's proprietary software. I just buy standard external USB hard drives and will let the Merc software handle the backups and incremental back ups. Towards the end of January, I'll be buying another hdd for this thing that will get my storage capacity back, but it won't be for the operating system, only file storage, so will likely go with a platter drive for that, no need for an SSD.

    I'm contemplating buying or building an SSD NAS for the house so that all the pc's can be backed up to it.

  8. #26
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    California
    Posts
    1,147
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    765
    Likes (Received)
    1209

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tonytn36 View Post
    I'm contemplating buying or building an SSD NAS for the house so that all the pc's can be backed up to it.
    How much data are you looking to store?

    If under 1TB, I think something like Dropbox or Google Drive is the way to go. The idea is to store all your files in the cloud folder and sync the folder on at least two computers. Your data is backed up on three or more devices in real time.

  9. #27
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Central Ohio USA
    Posts
    3,407
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    19
    Likes (Received)
    1478

    Default

    Re: the OP's choice of Macrium Reflect. You say it allows backup/cloning of Windows boot drive. Does it create a bootable backup, that works just like the original? So you just take out the bad one, put in the good backup, and you're good to go? Or do you need to reload/re-register Windows as part of the game?

    I use Carbon Copy Cloner on my Macs which allows just this. Pop out old drive, pop in new drive, go. Hoping for a similar solution for the one or two Windows machines in the herd.

    Chip

  10. #28
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Country
    CHINA
    Posts
    1,962
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    906

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 706jim View Post
    Lost all the parameters and pitch error comp on an old 6MB. Tape reader wouldn't read the mylar backup tapes; who knows why.
    But you can read it by hand, you know For an exec that would be painful but for a parameter tape, pretty easy.

    Next time I'll suggest stone tablets

  11. #29
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Flushing/Flint, Michigan
    Posts
    6,117
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    241
    Likes (Received)
    4936

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tonytn36 View Post
    ...
    I'm contemplating buying or building an SSD NAS for the house so that all the pc's can be backed up to it.
    Backups, the things you ignore until that one bad day.
    Many PCs have extra room in this day of large drives.
    One can put restoreable images on several machines with a stack of dates automatically if you have many drives on the network.
    This gives you a full restore, not just a file backup with a range of dates as the bug may be hidden for a bit. Viruses tend to do that.
    My cncs are all pc based so they can be setup do do this automatically during break times. They back up their systems to each other so the Blanchard gauge gets Monday, IC grinder 1 gets Tuesday, Cad1 holds month end, ect..
    Very rare that I have had to go back to these backups but OMG nice when needed.

    Making the backup becomes a real problem, one of those things you are all on for a bit but neglect if it is not automated.
    Sort of like New Year resolutions. I know I should do this and will for now.... but latter you tend to backslide.

    The win 10 problem is interesting and weird.
    Decades as the biggest hatter of M-soft on the planet dating back to 81 (long story) yet no problems at all with win 10.
    I wonder what the core problem is and what was missed.
    I kind of like the inside guts of this operating system.
    Bob

  12. #30
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Republic of Arizonia
    Posts
    1,396
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    340

    Default

    Over the years I've found it better to have multiple drives.

    #1: for the operating system.

    #2: for programs

    #3: backups

    Anymore it seems you need multiple processors so micro-crap can call home to verify your not using bootleg software...and run other background programs.

  13. Likes Steven-Canada liked this post
  14. #31
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Thunder Bay Canada
    Posts
    1,711
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    461
    Likes (Received)
    262

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SeaMoss View Post
    But you can read it by hand, you know For an exec that would be painful but for a parameter tape, pretty easy.

    Next time I'll suggest stone tablets
    In 1976 I could read tape.

    But this is now that was then.

    Not going to happen in 2017.

  15. #32
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Southeastern US
    Posts
    6,124
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    660
    Likes (Received)
    2470

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jashley73 View Post
    This will offer no comfort to you, but what a well written, entertaining post. (About a really crappy headache, no doubt.) You get some points for that one.


    ------------------


    Also, I'm 31, but I'm constantly impressed by the computer/electronics skills of people my father's age. Despite us being labeled as the "technology" generation, I fee; like we're pretty clueless about the "business" end of computers...
    Thank you.

    Most my age grew up at the beginning of the computer age. Back then there wasn't all this software and stuff to make life easier. I started out programming on BASIC with a whopping 16k of Extended RAM. There weren't hard drives back then, you saved everything to tape. It was pretty easy to run out of RAM even for seemingly small tasks using BASIC, so if it was anything semi-complicated, you had to program it in machine language.

    There weren't all these attachments and accessories either. If you wanted your computer to do something else besides put stuff on a screen, you designed and built an interface adapter yourself. (For instance, I built one to control 110VAC appliances / lights from my Tandy - circa 1983.) This gave folks a fairly deep understanding of how computers work at the very basic level.

    There were no repair shops, if the thing died you had to fix it yourself and unlike today where everything is modular plug and play and you just swap out a major component to fix your computer, back then you had to do board level component repair.

  16. #33
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Southeastern US
    Posts
    6,124
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    660
    Likes (Received)
    2470

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Chip Chester View Post
    Re: the OP's choice of Macrium Reflect. You say it allows backup/cloning of Windows boot drive. Does it create a bootable backup, that works just like the original? So you just take out the bad one, put in the good backup, and you're good to go? Or do you need to reload/re-register Windows as part of the game?

    I use Carbon Copy Cloner on my Macs which allows just this. Pop out old drive, pop in new drive, go. Hoping for a similar solution for the one or two Windows machines in the herd.

    Chip
    You can have it create an exact, sector by sector clone of the drive. If the drive is installed in your computer, you simply would go to the BIOS and tell it to boot from the backup drive and you are right back to where the last clone was done including all licenses and drivers for your hardware. For file backups, you can set it to do say a full backup once every 2 weeks, then incremental backups daily.

  17. #34
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Abingdon, VA
    Posts
    3,009
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3834
    Likes (Received)
    2328

    Default

    Has anybody ever came up with a simple way to turn off updates for Windows 10? It is the first Windows where there is no option to turn off the updates.

    It pisses me off when I'm on the Win10 computer at work, and out of the blue it pops up the auto update and restart window...it only allows you to push it out a few days. And then sometimes the SOB will be doing the auto-update thing, and I can't get onto the computer to print an invoice or something!

    I for one like to update very little, once a computer is working well, my theory is leave it the hell alone! For web machines, that's what antivirus and malware software is for, to help protect your machine.

    Being the conspiracy theorist I am, Microsoft is not only constantly updating Win10 to solve bugs and flaws, bu they are GATHERING data on how you use your computer, the websites you visit, etc. And, after collecting all this data, they can use it for their own future marketing efforts, and of course package and sell the data to other companies.

    Bill Gates is a hack. He lied to IBM to get the contract for DOS (what the hell were they thinking, giving such an important project to a small outfit with no history), he stole the idea for Windows, and every piece of software they have ever sold is flawed.

    The four-eyed bastard doesn't come close to walking in the shoes of true greatness like the late Steve Jobs.

    ToolCat

  18. #35
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Country
    CANADA
    State/Province
    Saskatchewan
    Posts
    9,225
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1065
    Likes (Received)
    3020

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by cnctoolcat View Post
    Has anybody ever came up with a simple way to turn off updates for Windows 10? It is the first Windows where there is no option to turn off the updates.

    It pisses me off when I'm on the Win10 computer at work, and out of the blue it pops up the auto update and restart window...it only allows you to push it out a few days. And then sometimes the SOB will be doing the auto-update thing, and I can't get onto the computer to print an invoice or something!

    I for one like to update very little, once a computer is working well, my theory is leave it the hell alone! For web machines, that's what antivirus and malware software is for, to help protect your machine.

    Being the conspiracy theorist I am, Microsoft is not only constantly updating Win10 to solve bugs and flaws, bu they are GATHERING data on how you use your computer, the websites you visit, etc. And, after collecting all this data, they can use it for their own future marketing efforts, and of course package and sell the data to other companies.

    Bill Gates is a hack. He lied to IBM to get the contract for DOS (what the hell were they thinking, giving such an important project to a small outfit with no history), he stole the idea for Windows, and every piece of software they have ever sold is flawed.

    The four-eyed bastard doesn't come close to walking in the shoes of true greatness like the late Steve Jobs.

    ToolCat
    The point in Windows 10 is that malware and security aspects need constant updating, regardless of 'how well' the machine is functioning at the moment. All machines are secure until the moment they aren't and nobody has a handle on any permanent level of security of an operating system that is probably written mostly by other machines. And face it, programmers get to be programmers if they pass their course by what percentage? 99%? Better? Not likely.

  19. #36
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    California
    Posts
    3,691
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    72
    Likes (Received)
    595

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by G00 Proto View Post
    A couple years back, my wife's hard drive got accidentally re-formatted by one of the kids. As a result, she lost all of the digital family pictures. Needless to say she was very upset. I dug around on the internet and bought a program that could recover data from damaged or erased hard drives. I was skeptical that it would work, but sure enough it brought back all of the jpegs that were stored anywhere on the computer, including the ones in Internet Explorers history... I was expecting a treasure trove of porn mixed in with the family photos. Instead I found all the family pictures and 10,000 pictures of women's shoes... I would have preferred the porn, it turns out my wife likes expensive shoes
    A format operation does not zero out data blocks, only file system structures. A physical format of the disk zones are done during manufacturing of the drive.

    I would rather look at women's shoes than ugly women performing in porn movies.

  20. #37
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    California
    Posts
    3,691
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    72
    Likes (Received)
    595

    Default

    Keeping a system drive with windows or whatever and a second drive with data and installation programs is what I do. Any crash or upgrade, then just the system drive is reinstalled. Does take some time but the process does restore a working machine.

    A second or third computer with replica data is going to insure you never have a bad computer day. Only a bad Microsoft day. Won't happen to me, a Fedora 26 kind of guy.

  21. #38
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Hatch, NM Chile capital of the WORLD
    Posts
    8,146
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    10752
    Likes (Received)
    8903

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tonytn36 View Post
    Thank you.

    Most my age grew up at the beginning of the computer age. Back then there wasn't all this software and stuff to make life easier. I started out programming on BASIC with a whopping 16k of Extended RAM.
    I find it amazing... The phone, that I paid $40 for, and fits in my pocket, has 750,000 times more
    memory than my first computer.

  22. Likes barbter, HuFlungDung liked this post
  23. #39
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Southeastern US
    Posts
    6,124
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    660
    Likes (Received)
    2470

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by cnctoolcat View Post
    Has anybody ever came up with a simple way to turn off updates for Windows 10? It is the first Windows where there is no option to turn off the updates.

    It pisses me off when I'm on the Win10 computer at work, and out of the blue it pops up the auto update and restart window...it only allows you to push it out a few days. And then sometimes the SOB will be doing the auto-update thing, and I can't get onto the computer to print an invoice or something!

    I for one like to update very little, once a computer is working well, my theory is leave it the hell alone! For web machines, that's what antivirus and malware software is for, to help protect your machine.

    Being the conspiracy theorist I am, Microsoft is not only constantly updating Win10 to solve bugs and flaws, bu they are GATHERING data on how you use your computer, the websites you visit, etc. And, after collecting all this data, they can use it for their own future marketing efforts, and of course package and sell the data to other companies.

    Bill Gates is a hack. He lied to IBM to get the contract for DOS (what the hell were they thinking, giving such an important project to a small outfit with no history), he stole the idea for Windows, and every piece of software they have ever sold is flawed.

    The four-eyed bastard doesn't come close to walking in the shoes of true greatness like the late Steve Jobs.

    ToolCat
    In settings, you can change when W10 installs the updates and make it do it when you aren't working. I have mine scheduled for 2AM. Just make sure everything you are working on is saved before you leave for the day.

    You can turn off most of the tracking and data collection, go to youtube and search for barnacules nerdgasm, he has a video tutorial on how to turn off that stuff on his channel. It's a couple years old so may have to go back a while on his video list.

  24. Likes cnctoolcat liked this post
  25. #40
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Spartanburg, South Carolina
    Posts
    1,529
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    46
    Likes (Received)
    87

    Default

    I use Terabyte's Bootit Bare Metal to make a complete image of my Windows partition every week or two. I include the date in the name of the image folder (ex. 121517.img for December 15, 2017). I also do an incremental backup (not imaged) of the partition where I store data.

    I save the image to my data partition and to two external hard drives, one of which is stored in a safety deposit box. I save at least the ten most recent backups. I also save the updated data files to the external drives.

    I can completely restore a hosed Windows 7 partition in twenty minutes. Over the past ten years, I've had to do a restore maybe half a dozen times.


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •