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  1. #1
    chipburner is offline Cast Iron
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    Thinking about getting one with geared head and 12 position turret. Any of you have experience with this lathe? Good? Bad? So what? Who cares?

  2. #2
    Heinz R. Putz is offline Hot Rolled
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    Daewoo CNC lathes have been around for a very long time, since the early 80s, they have a good reputation.
    I have used them many times in a lot of shops, I specialize in practical CNC training, so I get to use a lot of machines.
    They also have good backup, they are a good choice.
    They normally use Fanuc controls, so if you already know how to program, you should be in good shape. If you are new to CNC, look on the website for turning examples.
    Heinz. http://home.columbus.rr.com/hputz

  3. #3
    cnctoolcat's Avatar
    cnctoolcat is offline Titanium
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    Daewoo lathes have always been reliable, robust, fast, and accurate.

  4. #4
    chipburner is offline Cast Iron
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    How do you guys think the Daewoo 300LC would compare to a Haas SL-30 with the big bore option and geared head? I know the Daewoo is good, but the Haas is a lot cheaper and all the specs are pretty close to the same.

  5. #5
    integra is offline Plastic
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    I run a Daewoo 300C everyday and the SL-30 we have can't touch some of the stuff that the Dawoo machines no problem. The 300C will machine just about anything you throw at it.

  6. #6
    cnctoolcat's Avatar
    cnctoolcat is offline Titanium
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    The Daewoo 300LC should be a box-way machine, with a true slant bed. The 300LC will out cut the Haas like you would not believe!

    I have box-way and linear guide Mazak lathes in my shop. I can tell you from experience box ways make for a better cnc lathe. Better tool life. Better surface finishes. Waaay better dampening ability, which is crucial in helping to prevent chatter in dicey operations.

    I run a mining sleeve part out of 4140 Annealed. A recent order was a PIA on one of my linear guide QT15's. The steel must have been a little harder, or alloyed more. 1-3/16" insert drill would tend to squeal every now and then.

    I saved a few slugs from that run. I ran the last order on my older, box-way QT10. Guess what? No squealing from the insert drill. Identical setup and program. The ol' box-way workhorse gets-er-done!

  7. #7
    SeymourDumore is offline Diamond
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    Not really sure about Box-way having that advantage anymore when compared to a properly designed linear machine.
    From what it looks like, many of the bigger makers of production or ultra precision machines have all but abandoned the box way in lieu of linears.
    From what I have seen, Mori, OKK, Mitsui have all switched to linear guides exclusively. Some of them have dual screws with paralell drive arrangements and quad linear guides, but linear nonetheless.
    As a personal note, I wouldn't know that my Mori is linear instead of box. I almost miss the audible feedback when something isn't right. Plows into anything with no squeak, and the tools just last and last.

    As for the choice between the Daewoo or Haas, price should not be the deciding factor. If you can afford either one, then use different criteria instead. For me the control and support would give HAAS a major leg up. Accuracy should not be a problem for HAAS either. OTOH if you're hogging tons of steel all day long and not worry about stuff shaking loose, I'd look at real life experiences on the Daewoo. That is the only reason I got the Mori instead of a souped up SL20.

  8. #8
    cnctoolcat's Avatar
    cnctoolcat is offline Titanium
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    Hey Seymour,

    You are right in that most machine tool builders are using linear guides now. It's easier to build a cnc machine this way, and provides for faster rapids.

    However, only the Mori Duraturns are linear. The more expensive Mori lathes are box for X and Z, and linear for the tailstock. Virtually all previous generation Mori lathes are box-way construction.

    Okuma still offers box-way lathes as well. Mazak does only on the big lathes, and engine-lathe style M4's and M5's.

    It's interesting how all the historical box-way builders are offering linear guide lathes now.

    Inherently, I would think a box-way machining center would be more important than a box-way lathe. Since many machining center ops are "interrupted cuts". But, most machining centers on the market today are linear guide. Go figure.

  9. #9
    huskermcdoogle is offline Stainless
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    Our Daewoos have all been pumping out parts for years. We have had to slow the turrets down a bit due to wear, but they still continue to run without any big problems (most common problem being bent sheet metal.... stupid operators). I would take a Daewoo over a Haas any day of the week. As for the Box way vs Linear argument, I have no opinion on rigidity (have only cut AL on linear machines), but the linear machines are really quick in comparison to the box way machines (hence forth the reason the manufacturers are making linear machines). Talk to some Daewoo owners in your area and see how you local dealer is for getting parts and service, that should be one of your biggest decisions. If there service is poor, find an independent serviceman that works on Daewoos, if the owners in your local don't fix their machines themselves, chances are they use an independent, so ask, your dealer should find you some references.

    Husker

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