Machining Mahogany Questions---What to Use for Tooling - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    Also, if you need material you can contact a Woodcraft store. They can usually get whatever material you need.

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    Consider spiral downcut router bits if you're having surface chipout issues. Max your spindle, no point in running a router bit under 20k if you have the capability. Use an air blast to remove chips since a downcut cutter won't lift them out.

    Sent from my XT1053 using Tapatalk

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    Quote Originally Posted by Limy Sami View Post
    3, With 99% of woods, trying to work to +/- 0.002 (or some other inane tolerance ) is a complete waste of time, because it won't stay in tolerance for long !
    My grandfather, a retired machinist, took up woodworking after he retired. He made some corner desks for my dad's office and the drawers kept sticking because working to 1/16" of an inch clearance was not in his nature.

    Steve

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    Climb cutting works well. Otherwise Mahogany usually has a long straight grain and you can rip out a 2 or 3 foot strip in an instant (voice of experience). Beware of end grain tear out at the end of a cut when going across the end grain. I usually stop short and then cut back in from the other direction.

    Thanks,
    Jim.

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    mahogany-silver-bolt-handle-7-5-2017.jpg

    Out metal shop / wood shop teacher in Jr High in 1965 said, ~ ""What is for sale at the lumberyard as mahogany is what I would call "tropical cedar""

    My father bought some of that same cheap and available mahogany in 1959, and in 2017 I made a handle from it.

    It is horrible to machine.

    If you want to machine wood, get iron wood or the best... African BlackWood.

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    Quote Originally Posted by munruh View Post
    Thanks everyone for all the replies.........I appreciate them. I'm having a bit of a time finding mahogany wood.....our local lumberyards don't have it.
    google is your friend

    specialty lumber dealers in kansas - Google Search

    dee
    ;-D

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    Quote Originally Posted by munruh View Post
    Thanks everyone for all the replies.........I appreciate them. I'm having a bit of a time finding mahogany wood.....our local lumberyards don't have it.
    I don't know where you are located at in the state but I would call Roberson Lumber in Silver Lake. I've had good luck with them in the past.

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    My 2 cents. I have to machine a bunch of Redwood or Douglas Fir for a project. After asking here I got the sense that dealing with the sawdust --both fine and coarse-- in my VMC could turn into a nightmare. I really have zero interest in opening that door.

    My project has the budget so what I am doing instead is buying a $2,500 CNC router from Rockler:

    CNC Piranha XL(R) Base Model | Rockler Woodworking and Hardware

    I can do the work outside the CNC shop and avoid all of the issues related to injecting sawdust into a VMC. At the end of the job I'll decide whether to sell it or keep it. My guess is that I should be able to sell it for somewhere between $1,750 and $2,000. In other words, it would be like renting it for the job.

    One could even go cheaper but I'm not sure it's worth the hassle:

    Carbide 3D

    Also, I have a very different situation. I have to deal with 16 foot long pieces. It would be easier to have the wood stay stationary and have the cutter move, which is what these machines do.

    Anyhow, something to consider.

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    Try Woodworkers Supply, Rockler, ebay for possible sources of mahogany.

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    HSS will have a sharper edge then carbide and will produce a better finish. Sharpness is key. After a wood cutting job there will be wood fiber in your collant as it is impossible to clean it all up. A wet/dry vac helps. I run my collant through a filter for several passes to clean it up. I use an old sock suspended over the coolant tank and bypass the run to the machine. After vacuuming and washing down the machining area in an effort to washout the remaining fiber cycle the coolant through the filter for several passes while stirring the tank. Cotton socks will also capture tramp oil.

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    HSS will have sharper edges for a while, but it will dull faster. Carbide made for aluminum is quite sharp, and will hold its edge for years of use.

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    Carbide is the standard for high quality wood router bits, manual or CNC, as long as it has proper geometry for wood (as others said, alu geometry will work ok as long as it is sharp). There is no reason to use HSS unless you are grinding a cutting tool yourself or trying to save some $$$ on an unimportant one-off operation.

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    Been working wood for years so my recommendation comes from experience. You can put a sharper edge on HSS (this assumes you are sharpening your tools)and as a result it will produce a smoother finish. Carbide provides resistance to heat and increases durability enabeling increased depth of cut. Using carbide provides additional margin and is helpful in preventing tool damage for those with less experience which is the mass market for most bits. Rough with carbide if time is an issue but finish with HSS.
    Run a piece of mahogoney through a surface planner, once with carbide blades and once with HSS and the difference will jump out at you.

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    Good afternoon,

    The mahogany is abrasive with HSS , for me isn't good because suffers wear, is much better the Carbide end mills or inserts, I work in a factory of Guitars and see every day that.

    Regards

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    Quote Originally Posted by Spyderedge View Post
    Max your spindle, no point in running a router bit under 20k if you have the capability.
    9 times out of 10 this couldn't be further from the truth. Sure you can cut with most bits at 20k, but the reality is you are going to rub the cutter to death. Feeding fast enough becomes a problem at these spindle speeds. Best advice I can give on spindle speed is set the spindle speed to give you the cut-load you can attain given the federate you can move at. With look-ahead and whatnot, its hard to maintain a fast enough feed unless everything you do is a straight line. With a 3/8 router bit you can expect to be at about .010" per tooth per rev. At 20k with a 2 flute tool. That 400 IPM, sure many machines can move that fast, but many will have trouble with that speed maintaining accuracy doing a complex profile.

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    Oneida Air Systems is the place to get dust collection. plug plug

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    Quote Originally Posted by munruh View Post
    I have a job coming up that includes machining some mahogany blocks....Has anyone machined wood? What kind of tooling should I be looking at? It will be squaring ups some 2" x 4" blocks and milling some steps and angle in them. Thanks
    Common problem with machining wood on metal cutting machinery is oil and if the end product will have some type of finish then that could be a problem. As for the surface speed for high speed steel cutters I have seen several sites that provide that INFO. I made some socket, ratchet and break over trays out of oak and I was surprised by the amount of heat that it generated. Just wing it and you'll know just as much as the rest of us.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Limy Sami View Post
    AND ABOVE ALL, get yourself some sort of face mask (AKA ;- hooter filter ) even the 3M paper cup types are quite good, BUT some exotics are ''quite nasty'' in which case use a decent respirator or air flow mask etc etc
    A chemist I worked with - a sensible, well-educated and very intelligent man - told me that, weight for weight, mahogany dust is more toxic than cyanide. I never had cause to question this as I don't work with mahogany. Has anybody any idea whether it is actually true?

    George

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    I cut wood all day long with a Cnc router. I mostly use solid carbide end mills made for steel. Only use brand new mills, if it has been used on steel even for secconds it is not sharp enough and will burn and tear out. I have used wood spcific solid carbide end mills and apart from roughers I have not noticed much if any difference. I am not running production but making tooling so maybe I would notice a difference if I were running production. Aluminum specific end mills are really sharp but are high helix which can tend to cause tear out.

    Wood specific end mills tend to be considerably more expensive than metal end mills. If you are only using standard length end mills in smaller sizes it is not a big deal. But larger extra long end mills can add up to a lot of money. As well a lot of the longer sizes are not available in wood specific end mills. I am in the run it at the highest RPM you can camp.


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