Machining Mahogany Questions---What to Use for Tooling - Page 3
Close
Login to Your Account
Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 41 to 45 of 45
  1. #41
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Cerritos, CA
    Posts
    162
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    45
    Likes (Received)
    61

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by munruh View Post
    I have a job coming up that includes machining some mahogany blocks....Has anyone machined wood? What kind of tooling should I be looking at? It will be squaring ups some 2" x 4" blocks and milling some steps and angle in them. Thanks
    First you should post a drawing of the part with your question in the woodworking section. You (a non woodworker)are getting answers from mostly cnc guys. How can anyone answer your question without all the information - the design, grain direction, etc. Also, does whoever designed this part know anything about wood?

  2. Likes carbonbl liked this post
  3. #42
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    2,298
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    976
    Likes (Received)
    789

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by huskermcdoogle View Post
    9 times out of 10 this couldn't be further from the truth. Sure you can cut with most bits at 20k, but the reality is you are going to rub the cutter to death. Feeding fast enough becomes a problem at these spindle speeds. Best advice I can give on spindle speed is set the spindle speed to give you the cut-load you can attain given the federate you can move at. With look-ahead and whatnot, its hard to maintain a fast enough feed unless everything you do is a straight line. With a 3/8 router bit you can expect to be at about .010" per tooth per rev. At 20k with a 2 flute tool. That 400 IPM, sure many machines can move that fast, but many will have trouble with that speed maintaining accuracy doing a complex profile.
    Woodworkers have been using conventional router tables for decades. The cutters are designed to work with high speed and slow feeds. Most CNC machines can feed faster than people feed material on router tables, although there are exceptions.

    I do not believe you can take .010" per tooth without chipout. Maybe with a downcut helix, but most router bits are not downcut helix.

    I have machined a lot of wood on manual mills and on router tables. I find that slow speeds abd high feeds simply tear out a lot of material.

    Sent from my XT1053 using Tapatalk

  4. #43
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Texas
    Posts
    1,437
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    7
    Likes (Received)
    113

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Spyderedge View Post

    I do not believe you can take .010" per tooth without chipout. Maybe with a downcut helix, but most router bits are not downcut helix.
    Everyday my friend. Roughing you can go upwards of .025" per tooth with larger staggered type tools. The idea is to find the highest feed per tooth that gives you an acceptable finish, and then find the highest spindle speed that you can feed the machine at and not chatter. For teariut, it's almost all about edge sharpness. If you have rubbed the tool just a little bit by underfeeding it, you won't be able to get good performance like this. It may cut well at high speeds and slow feeds still, but it will tear out at a higher feed per tooth once you lose that razor sharp edge. It also depends greatly on the material grain direction and how well you are holding the material. Compression bits certainly help, and order of ops also help a lot. In what I do no surface is left uncut from blank to finished part. If I was profiling finished surface material, I would most definitely be using a compression bit, but for what I do, being 3D in nature, it's rarely needed, as you can usually find a way around grain tearout without special tools or slow feeds and speeds.

    Sorry to spew words and thoughts, replying from the phone. I cut figured and plain walnut everyday of the week now, figured walnut is far more challenging than any other material I have ever cut. When you look at a job and go, I can cut that, easy peasy, then cut a sample and have chipouts where you didn't think you have any, it's at that moment you realize you were just humbled by a simple piece of wood. 9 times out of 10 slowing down isn't the answer, instead you have to change the direction of the forces, or support the area of concern differently.

  5. Likes Spyderedge, carbonbl liked this post
  6. #44
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Arizona
    Posts
    75
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    59
    Likes (Received)
    29

    Default

    Yup, huskermcdoogle is spot on regarding chip loads. Check out Onsrud's recommended hardwood cutting data https://www.onsrud.com/files/pdf/201...ard%20Wood.pdf

    There's also some amazing insert tooling out there for wood, I've used a big Leitz insert cutter aggressively on figured woods and could get surface finishes that could go right to 150 or 220 grit sanding.

  7. #45
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Texas
    Posts
    1,437
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    7
    Likes (Received)
    113

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by carbonbl View Post
    Yup, huskermcdoogle is spot on regarding chip loads. Check out Onsrud's recommended hardwood cutting data https://www.onsrud.com/files/pdf/201...ard%20Wood.pdf

    There's also some amazing insert tooling out there for wood, I've used a big Leitz insert cutter aggressively on figured woods and could get surface finishes that could go right to 150 or 220 grit sanding.
    Yeah we typically start at 150 when sanding free form surfaces cut with an 1/8" stepover. It just speeds things up a bit and makes the paper last longer.


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •