Old Bridgeport CNC Identification and Questions
Close
Login to Your Account
Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    New York
    Posts
    4
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Question Old Bridgeport CNC Identification and Questions

    Hi,so quick intro since I'm new here and somewhat new to machining,currently in college finishing up my first year in machine tool so still learning
    tons but am familiar with basic manual machining but we don't learn CNC until the second year so I'm not familiar with all the CNC terms.

    So I just bought a set of milling machines, a manual millport 9x42 bridgeport clone with feed and DRO which what was I wanted and the other is an old bridgeport textron cnc, I'm still in the process of moving it in so I haven't gotten a chance to completely look it over for a model but quick inspection didn't find anything and it looks like the name plate has been removed.

    It has been sitting for about 10yrs with very little use as the previous owner bought it for mold work but after he bought it his machinist left and it never got much use. so besides how to jog it manually he wasn't able to show me how to run it.

    So any help identifying it would be greatly appreciated and if you need a picture of a certain part let me know and I'll get some more but here's what I've got right now:
    [IMG]20171227_144346 by Joseph Snyder, on Flickr[/IMG]

    20171227_142559 by Joseph Snyder, on Flickr

    20180101_120004 by Joseph Snyder, on Flickr

    20180101_120010 by Joseph Snyder, on Flickr



    Where should I look for the serial number?
    Can you identify the model and were I can get a manual for it?
    And I'd also be interested in knowing what would be needed to convert it to a modernish CNC
    My brother is a machinist graduate, computer technician, and has a bench top cnc that runs on mach 3 but I'm sure I could get training in what ever would work best.

    And any other info you can give me about these machines, quirks things they did well.

    Tried search the web and from what I can find it might be a Bridgeport series 2 but I've found some conflicting info so not really sure what I've got
    Thanks any help or advice you can give me,
    Joe

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    GA
    Posts
    548
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1
    Likes (Received)
    87

    Default

    I'm not sure what model that is but for a low buck conversion its pretty easy to put a breakout board in there and run from a parallel port on a modern PC running mach 3 even using original drives and steppers. I only have the diagrams of how to do that on a boss 5 (which yours is definitely not) but I'm sure once you find out what model it is you'll be able to get the info you need with some googling.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Ohio
    Posts
    642
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    364
    Likes (Received)
    643

    Default

    I'd also say Series 2 (as evidenced by II on the control).
    I ran an older one back in the '80s, but it ran off paper tape.

    Sorry I can't be more help.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    42
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    18

    Default

    That brings back some memories !! looks like a mid 70's vintage series 2 Bridgeport NC like the ones I learned on way back then. ran them on punched paper tape using compact 2 programming language to program them. They had a screaming fast rapid traverse of 40 inches a minute as I recall. where I worked we would program using the compact 2 to describe the geometry on a teletype machine then hook up with a fast 300 baud modem to a main frame computer that would spit out the punched paper tape.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Temecula, Ca
    Posts
    1,731
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    764
    Likes (Received)
    2320

    Default

    off the top of my head, it looks newer than a Boss 5, and older than a Boss 8.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    New York
    Posts
    4
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tomjelly View Post
    I'm not sure what model that is but for a low buck conversion its pretty easy to put a breakout board in there and run from a parallel port on a modern PC running mach 3 even using original drives and steppers. I only have the diagrams of how to do that on a boss 5 (which yours is definitely not) but I'm sure once you find out what model it is you'll be able to get the info you need with some googling.
    Glad to here it should be possible to convert without spending a fortune, after getting it unloaded and looking it over in better lighting today, the machine really looks to be in excellent condition.

    Thanks for everyone's input so far, when I get a chance this weekend I'll try and do some more digging and see about getting a manual for it.

    Joe

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Country
    FINLAND
    Posts
    131
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    27
    Likes (Received)
    33

    Default

    Wow, where did you dig that dinosaur up from? Did you power it up, smoke or movement?

    One thing that is good about these old machines, they are rigid, it'll eat all the chinese hobby mills for breakfast.
    If she's not too worn, it will last you a long time.

    If it's going to be production machine of any sort, I would stay clear of anything running microshit software.
    There are more control options than mach.

    Marko

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    New York
    Posts
    4
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MJPfin View Post
    Wow, where did you dig that dinosaur up from? Did you power it up, smoke or movement?

    One thing that is good about these old machines, they are rigid, it'll eat all the chinese hobby mills for breakfast.
    If she's not too worn, it will last you a long time.

    If it's going to be production machine of any sort, I would stay clear of anything running microshit software.
    There are more control options than mach.

    Marko
    Found it at a injection molding company that bought it 10yrs ago when they had a machinist to be able to
    do some of their own mold and plate work etc. but right after they got everything setup their machinist left,
    so besides occasionally using it to thin large plates the machines has seen very little use for the last 10yrs.

    The owner didn't know how to program it but he did show x,y, and z table/knee movement which went smoothly.
    at first I only really got the machine because of the two for one deal but the longer I have it the more I'd like to get it up and going,
    The table looks to be unused because of the plate that's been mounted on it.

    Am open to other control options what would you suggest? I simply brought up mach because it was mentioned to work well in another conversion.
    Its going to be used for hobbie work and small production runs of parts.

    Here are some more pictures of the mills:

    20180103_193723 by Joseph Snyder, on Flickr

    20180103_193644 by Joseph Snyder, on Flickr

    20180103_193651 by Joseph Snyder, on Flickr

    20180103_193658_001 by Joseph Snyder, on Flickr

    20180103_193708 by Joseph Snyder, on Flickr


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •