Tumbling Aluminum in Ceramic - How to eliminate residue? - Page 3
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  1. #41
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    Default Have you tried?

    [QUOTE=CosmosK;3120693]I'm using ceramic triangles to deburr Aluminum parts. A couple hours does a nice job then I put them in walnut shells for polish...."

    Have you tried using builders sand? Same hardness as ceramics, less expensive, etc. I used it in a fine form in an airmill to deburr aluminum. It should work in a tumbler or just insert a Timer relay into the control circuit.

  2. #42
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    I've used "Simple Green" for decades, ... with good results.


    .

  3. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by david n View Post
    Years ago I tried to tumble parts with a little fresh coolant in the mix. I figured it lubes and it would keep the parts from rusting the moment they where removed from the tumbler. Boy what a mistake. It caused a greasy, sticky schmoo to adhere to the parts. I had to hand scrub each part to get it off. I think you are basically having the same issue. The oils in the soap are creating a sludge with the "shavings" and turning into a sticky paste.
    I did the same thing recently. Had some Mean Green degreaser in the water running some steel parts. Water level looked a little low so instead of walking 40ft and getting some water, I picked up a gallon jug of diluted coolant within reach and toppped up the liquid level.

    Anyone who wants to know how parts look when tumbled in lard oughta just try this simple trick. Actually, I think lard would be easier to wash off, not to mention cleaning all the glop out of the bowl itself.

    On aluminum I run a little Dawn in the water and run the recirc pump to keep the crud washing out into the pan where the pump sits.

    Someone mentioned it taking twice as long to deburr when using soap as compared to plain water. I've found the opposite to be true so long as you don't get too heavy on the soap. An ounce of Dawn in a gallon of water is plenty.

    Our water here is dead soft, so I can't say what the same thing would do in hard water, but I have heard my dad talk about the water in Indiana being real hard when he was in college there, and that hand soap would just form a sort of scum on your hands if the chemicals in the water softener got low.

  4. #44
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    I've been using liquid diswaher detergent from the $ store
    It dosnt foam/suds
    Drain and rinse with clean water towards end of run
    Rinse with hot water if possible and dry to prevent spots

  5. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by ortho View Post
    CosmosK,
    Have you considered sodium hydroxide (lye)? I used it as a poor man's paint remover on some painted aluminum parts. Much to my dismay, the lye was also aggressive against the aluminum parts.
    ---ortho
    Have not considered that. My crud days are over it seems. I didn't understand it was the oil content that was creating the gunk. I haven't had a problem since.. rocking the palmolive. I assume dawn is probably pretty similar chemically.

  6. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by Smoothbore View Post
    I've used "Simple Green" for decades, ... with good results.


    .
    Gotta be careful with simple green on aluminum - that stuff will etch the aluminum. It will do it slowly, and is much worse with heat, but it will etch it nevertheless. It will provide good cleaning action, but if you didn't want any etching action, you don't wanna use Simple Green.

    I use regular dawn in a pinch of Palmolive (better). The gunk buildup is usually when the media is dirty and the parts have oil residue on them. It seems to be basically media residue and aluminum powder forming a grime/sludge that is getting pummeled into the surface of the aluminum. Total bitch to remove. That's why SG works well to remove it - it's actually cutting the surface of the aluminum a bit.

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  8. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by mjk View Post
    I've been using liquid diswaher detergent from the $ store
    It dosnt foam/suds
    Drain and rinse with clean water towards end of run
    Rinse with hot water if possible and dry to prevent spots
    Quick story.. Had a job years ago that required a passivate to a spec I had never seen or
    seen since.. It required 2 rinses, a room temp rinse for whatever and then a second rinse
    at 150 degrees for X time...

    Everything in that spec was the same crap I was used to using QQ-P-35, but the HOT water rinse,
    what the hell was that about??

    It was actually very smart.. The hot water, gets the part hot. It dries damn near instantly when
    you take it out of the hot water rinse. Pretty neat little trick.

  9. #48
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    It was actually very smart.. The hot water, gets the part hot. It dries damn near instantly when
    you take it out of the hot water rinse. Pretty neat little trick.
    Well that's the goal of our hot water based parts worsher too. Some parts carry more heat out the other end than others tho. Internal threads are the biggest problem tho as they hold moisture.


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