New Machine Day - Aciera F5 - Page 4
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  1. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlfaGTA View Post
    Table also looks a bit shy on clamping bolts for the tilt and swivel...also wonder if the "hung from a single angle" at the top of the slide that Aciera used was less effective at dampening
    low frequency vibrations than a full hard bolted mount....

    Maybe the Swiss just didn't expect anyone to run these machines all that hard....

    Cheers Ross
    The sort of equivalent in a Deckel table I recently sold... I suppose the Aciera table makes up for less clamping bolts to some extent by having some pretty serious thick casting and larger bolts

  2. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by rklopp View Post
    The taper pin on the F4 head does not put it into close enough tram to suit my tastes, I think because the taper hole may have been buggered at some point.
    On my Deckel FP2, the taper pin for the head rides in an eccentric bushing, which can be aligned by rotating the bushing (it has flats for that purpose). Perhaps your F4 head taper pin has a similar alignment adjustment.

  3. #63
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    My take on the adjustable reference pin is that Deckel only used that setup on the long reach vertical head.....Thinking that is because the long reach head was an accessory and mated to a machine
    on being sold, not fit as an ongoing part of the machine.

    Standard vertical heads were mated to the base machine carrying a tag having the serial number of the base machine, and a notation of how much the vertical head was displaced (if any)
    from the horizontal spindle....To my knowledge the long reach heads had no such tag.

    Later machines omitted serial number tags on the vertical head along with the notation on the vertical spindle displacement....

    Cheers Ross

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  5. #64
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    Ross, my long-reach vertical head is matched to the machine (stamped number) and also carries a tag saying that the vertical head is displaced 0.02mm to the left of the horizontal spindle.

  6. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlfaGTA View Post
    Table also looks a bit shy on clamping bolts for the tilt and swivel...also wonder if the "hung from a single angle" at the top of the slide that Aciera used was less effective at dampening
    low frequency vibrations than a full hard bolted mount....

    Maybe the Swiss just didn't expect anyone to run these machines all that hard....

    Cheers Ross
    ?? Seems to me there's a huge amount of clamped contact in each of the swivel directions, so it is rather hard bolted. In particular, the A axis (the one with an axle) has amazingly finely scraped surfaces covering large area around the clamping T-bolts. The T-bolts work on pretty big lever arms out from the pivots. The force required to make any of those slip would likely damage the spindle bearings or such. In any event, any hard running would throw chips all over creation, so I'll save that for the FP2NC with the enclosure.

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  8. #66
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    Here is a diagram showing how I have powered the mill from single-phase residential power. It is an open-delta system, corner-grounded on the high-voltage side. Note the lack of a fuse in the grounded corner leg (the neutral). If there were a fuse in that leg and if there were a fault between it and one of the ungrounded legs, the grounded fuse could open while leaving the ungrounded legs powered. That would not be good. It's the same reason there are no fuses in a regular residential neutral even though the neutral carries current.

    slide1.jpg
    The F5 runs just fine on this system, even plug-reversing the spindle motor. All wiring is in EMT or liquid-tite conduit. The wiring is all rated for 600V, as is the disconnect on the high side.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails slide1.jpg  

  9. #67
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    When I first got the F5, the X-axis was very tight at each end of the travel. I feared the ways were worn heavily in the middle. Unlike the F4, the F5 X-axis bronze nut is adjustable for backlash. That turned out to be the issue. As soon as I loosened the backlash a little, the tightness went away. I took the X leadscrew out, and can push the slide from end to end without any binding. The scraping underneath still looks gorgeous. Oddly, the F5 manual I got from Industrial Manuals does not show an adjustable-backlash X nut. I estimate the screw has about 0.010" backlash in the middle and zero at the ends. The F4 has slightly more in the middle.

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