Oerlikon Italiana Milling Machine size "3", Model MN3H - Page 6
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  1. #101
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    I can't totally answer you guys yet on lube system. But I have a few details. I've been working in the field this week, and lube box is at my work.

    I have a pic of lube box sitting on table, when I first picked up machine from seller. It has a wiring harness connected to machine. Also you need to plug an air hose from shop air pressure to it.

    There is a minor half page explanation, of pneumatic lube system. It claims you add oil to the pump system, which reading between lines, is in the box. It did appear that one of the lines in pic I posted earlier, goes to knee, but I don't know that it sucks oil there, as the page seems to indicate different.

    Also, if I am reading it right, the machine won't start until both electric and air is supplied.

    The first two pics are general lube specs for column, gear boxes, and such.

    96.jpg97.jpg98.jpg99.jpg100.jpg

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  3. #102
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    Interesting that whether built in Italy or Switzerland...this machine was definitely made specifically to be imported to an English speaking country. All the plaques and instructions are in English.
    Did not see enough of the machine to know if the feeds are defined on the selector dial in inches/min. Guessing that they are.
    You did not mention, or i missed it but i am guessing that all the axis feed movement dials are calibrated in inches which means if dials have round number values per rotation , that the
    screws are also made to inch pitch standards.....

    Lube tank looks out of place with that machine....has the look of some after thought, not purpose built.Would have thought that a machine that seemingly has a relatively high build quality would have had a lube setup that
    was more integrated. Guess you will know more as you get along with the clean and assemble....
    Not my favorite setup for a manual mill, that of needing compressed air to enable operation.....

    If i had to guess i would say that the machine itself most likely built in Italy....Looks to my eye to be too "boxy" to have been designed and built in Switzerland....
    Cheers Ross

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  5. #103
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlfaGTA View Post
    If i had to guess i would say that the machine itself most likely built in Italy....Looks to my eye to be too "boxy" to have been designed and built in Switzerland....
    Oerlikon's present-day website has the history on the factory in Northern Italy.

    Design does exhibit the flavours of Rambaudi and similar firms in a wide area, anchored on Milano & Torino. Even so, there seem to be Swiss fingerprints in it as well. Bits of it that hint of being a tad overly thorough.

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  7. #104
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlfaGTA View Post
    Interesting that whether built in Italy or Switzerland...this machine was definitely made specifically to be imported to an English speaking country. All the plaques and instructions are in English.
    Did not see enough of the machine to know if the feeds are defined on the selector dial in inches/min. Guessing that they are.
    You did not mention, or i missed it but i am guessing that all the axis feed movement dials are calibrated in inches which means if dials have round number values per rotation , that the
    screws are also made to inch pitch standards.....

    Lube tank looks out of place with that machine....has the look of some after thought, not purpose built.Would have thought that a machine that seemingly has a relatively high build quality would have had a lube setup that
    was more integrated. Guess you will know more as you get along with the clean and assemble....
    Not my favorite setup for a manual mill, that of needing compressed air to enable operation.....

    If i had to guess i would say that the machine itself most likely built in Italy....Looks to my eye to be too "boxy" to have been designed and built in Switzerland....
    Cheers Ross
    The dial for quill on vertical attachment is definitely inches. With the exception of lube capacities, the manual lists everything in Imperial, inches, pounds,and such. There is basically an inch ruler mounted on knee for rough saddle cross feed placement. I did not find "in." stamped on the main feed dials yet, but my impression is it is in inches.

    I also think that lube box was not 100% built for all their machines. But I do think this machine was originally shipped with it. If you note the pics in my last post, Most of the printed manual is well defined, though old. The page for the lube box looks different and the print not as nice, though i didn't catch the edges of page in the pic, the edge was stamped "oerlikon" or some mark that i knew it came with the machine.

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  9. #105
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    Quote Originally Posted by texasgunsmith View Post
    The dial for quill on vertical attachment is definitely inches. With the exception of lube capacities, the manual lists everything in Imperial, inches, pounds,and such. There is basically an inch ruler mounted on knee for rough saddle cross feed placement. I did not find "in." stamped on the main feed dials yet, but my impression is it is in inches.

    I also think that lube box was not 100% built for all their machines. But I do think this machine was originally shipped with it. If you note the pics in my last post, Most of the printed manual is well defined, though old. The page for the lube box looks different and the print not as nice, though i didn't catch the edges of page in the pic, the edge was stamped "oerlikon" or some mark that i knew it came with the machine.
    I've worked on a couple of Swiss milling machines that had rules let into the machine for measuring long distances. Pre DRO's that was pretty handy.

    Regards Tyrone.

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    Quote Originally Posted by texasgunsmith View Post
    I also think that lube box was not 100% built for all their machines. But I do think this machine was originally shipped with it. If you note the pics in my last post, Most of the printed manual is well defined, though old. The page for the lube box looks different and the print not as nice, though i didn't catch the edges of page in the pic, the edge was stamped "oerlikon" or some mark that i knew it came with the machine.
    About as safe a bet as exists they'd have been in the same boat as many generations of machine-tool builders, USA who went to Gits Brothers, Lunkenheimer, Alemite/Zerk, later Bijur, Trico, and others among the usual specialists in liquid and lubrication management for whatever kit they needed.

    So, yah. "grafted on", and all that sez is they made the attempt to provide some level of integration as reduction in vulnerability to in-use damage. We've seen plenty of others as may as well have been hung off an ignorant drywall picture hook for all the flimsiness as obvious "afterthought" they displayed. No surprise - those are the ones dry for decades over a cracked reservoir.

    By comparison? Oerlikon-Italiana done good for yah on the durability and functionality score. Damned good.

    If the aesthetics offend? Just upholster the bugger in fine grey suede leather and address it as "Sie", not "Du".


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  12. #107
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    As to the ruler thing...Have them on all three axis slides on my FP4NC....and i love having them.
    No settable mechanical trip stops that can give a quick visual sight test for travel limits..and when doing one off projects that tax the movements for length and position, its invaluable to have the rulers so you know where you are
    at any given time.....Mostly where the end of travel is and aprox. how much travel is left.....

    Have a later version FP4NC in the shop as well and it is sans the rulers....deemed not needed by the builders...That machine is less friendly to run large
    jobs...Had a lead on some rulers that i could add, but seems the source bailed on me.....
    Cheers Ross

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  14. #108
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlfaGTA View Post
    As to the ruler thing...Have them on all three axis slides on my FP4NC....and i love having them.
    No settable mechanical trip stops that can give a quick visual sight test for travel limits..and when doing one off projects that tax the movements for length and position, its invaluable to have the rulers so you know where you are
    at any given time.....Mostly where the end of travel is and aprox. how much travel is left.....

    Have a later version FP4NC in the shop as well and it is sans the rulers....deemed not needed by the builders...That machine is less friendly to run large
    jobs...Had a lead on some rulers that i could add, but seems the source bailed on me.....
    Cheers Ross
    Before the electronics to enable DRO's yet existed... what was later to be back-nomenclatured as a Bridgeport "1J", had a precision SS scale with optically enhanced vernier attached to it, two-axis only.

    No klew who made that. Certainly less convenient to read than a DRO with a nice colour screen.

    It was, however, backlash-immune and fair-decent for accuracy, the tight tolerances production tooling for tiny hearing aids needed.

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  16. #109
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlfaGTA View Post
    .Had a lead on some rulers that i could add, but seems the source bailed on me.....
    Cheers Ross

    Have you looked at these? McMaster-Carr
    I didn't research them exhaustively to fit a certain application but there sure is a wide variety.

    I've seen some magnetic rule tapes also that look attractive, and could be moved to be 'reset' like a DRO.

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  18. #110
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    All the feeds are in inches. Pretty cool what you can see when you spin the dials, lol. Plus a pic of the crossfeed ruler.

    Also got up to my work today. Got a pic of inside that lube delivery box.

    Oh another fyi, as I had discussed it previous. Didn't make the Texas scraping class. While I'd like to give it a shot, and I may in the future, I'm just stretched like a rubber band time wise at the moment. I need to get not just this machine, but my home shop in order. Probably need to get myself in order as well, lol. I feel like I've been working harder and more unorganized than I should be.

    Plus I'd like to do a bit more research on the topic, tools, etc. It was a totally last minute idea as I just happened onto the post and the date of class after ballen mentioned it. I had just started seriously reading up on it this week, and well, I'm thinking I need more research time.

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  20. #111
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    If you can, I strongly suggest taking the two hour trip and visit the class before it's over.

    Paolo

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    Quote Originally Posted by AlfaGTA View Post
    Had a lead on some rulers that i could add, but seems the source bailed on me.....
    Cheers Ross
    Dunno if it helps, but I've scarfed up a collection of "workaday" goods I'm not too worried about cutting up for this-and-that by taking advantage of PEC "blems" these folks have on special now and then:

    PEC Tools Products - Taylor Toolworks

    So far, the "blemish" has never been on the graduations, so just the ticket for adding to a workbench edge or infeed to a saw where a rule or scale is going to live a hard life, regardless.

    UNblemished PEC are decent value-for-money as well, of course:

    PEC Tools - Precision Measuring and Electronic Tools

    Not as pretty as a frosted chrome Starrett, but they are readable and accurate "enough".

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  23. #113
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    I went ahead and got the overarm off. It was a whole lot lighter than I was expecting, 490 lbs. I was thinking closer to 1000.

    I wanted to work on getting the column home today, but my dear and loving wife informed me that apparently I have family things to do now, from early to mid afternoon, so today's productivity is going somewhere, just don't know where.



    102.jpg103.jpg

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    Whilst I have some big pieces off, and am doing some cleaning, I thought I might try to paint at least some hard to reach places, if not most of the machine.

    I have had really good luck with the machinery paint from the Tractor Supply co. The brand is Magik I believe. Not a large variety of colors from them, but it had been pretty resilient to bangs or scratches, and oil does not seem to stain or loosen the paint. Oil based enamel. I have used primarily Massey Ferguson gray on my machines, and thought I might do something different this time.

    I had been toying with the idea of a shade or two lighter than the M.F. gray. Or a gray with a hint of blue in it. Or maybe even a blue.

    Got to mixing some colors. I think I am going with the blue in 2nd pic, a single blue dot. Its 2 parts Light Ford Gray ( damn close to white imo ), and 1 part Ford blue (old Ford Blue I believe).

    In searching mill pics, I found a mill with similar color that looked real pleasing I thought, in pic 3.

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  26. #115
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    The last place I worked at painted everything that colour. I can't say I was a big fan but maybe the paint quality wasn't that great. I liked the dark green fixed elements and the light green moving elements scheme myself. " Alhambra and Peridot " , I can never remember which is which though.

    Regards Tyrone.

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    Quote Originally Posted by texasgunsmith View Post
    I went ahead and got the overarm off. It was a whole lot lighter than I was expecting, 490 lbs. I was thinking closer to 1000.

    I wanted to work on getting the column home today, but my dear and loving wife informed me that apparently I have family things to do now, from early to mid afternoon, so today's productivity is going somewhere, just don't know where.



    102.jpg103.jpg
    Overarms are usually lighter than they look, normally they are well webbed. That weigh scale is very handy.

    Regards Tyrone.

  28. #117
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    Got the column home, and in its final position I believe. Got it fairly level as well. I'm about 59 inches off the wall, to face of vertical ways, That'll give me a few inches clearance when overarm is rolled all the way back to mount vertical attachment.

    I'm sure it'll all be a funny story a month from now, but I hate moving machines around, lol.

    I'm a little crammed up now, but once assembled I should be able to get around pretty well. You can see the distance between mill and the tan universal grinder in pic 3, That's going to be a little tighter with knee back on, but I have about 8 to 12 inches that I can comfortably move universal grinder directly away from mill.

    Don't judge the mess, I kind of had to make things happen to get it all in, lol. I expect I'm probably going to be a month or so by the time I got cleaning and assembly done, besides squaring away general house keeping.

    110.jpg111.jpg112.jpg

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