Welding and Fitting Employees - best practices on requiored employee owned tools
Close
Login to Your Account
Results 1 to 17 of 17
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    4,935
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2581
    Likes (Received)
    2799

    Default Welding and Fitting Employees - best practices on requiored employee owned tools

    2018 and is the year of getting our stuff together here - time to codify and write it down I want to come up with a list of tools someone employed as a Welder or a Welder/Fitters should be required to bring to work. Curious what other shops do.

    Anyone have a good list - what do you expect to have to provide yourself? Managers, do have a published list?

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Sandy Hook, MB Canada
    Posts
    879
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1
    Likes (Received)
    169

    Default

    Hello Mcgyver
    I don't know what the "law" says, but I'd imagine a guy would want to use his own beanie, helmet, coveralls & leathers. I personally wouldn't want to have to use someone else's.

  3. Likes Mcgyver liked this post
  4. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    New York
    Posts
    760
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    280
    Likes (Received)
    251

    Default

    by law, nothing.

    employer is required to provide all necessary PPE.

    optional, whatever they would like, as long as it meets ANSI specs where applicable.

    a smart company policy would specify type and extent of PPE for a given process and parameter, I. E. , "overhead welding ( as defined by AWS) preformed with the SMAW process shall require full leather upper body protection in good condition free from burnthroughs, exterior pockets, etc... etc... failure to comply with the safety policy as stated herein can result in immediate termination... etc etc..

    before the haters start piling on, no that is NOT my preference, it is all in there to please the lawyers and insurers, and it is up to management to enforce the rules sensibly. I'm responding to the OP here...

  5. Likes Mcgyver liked this post
  6. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    4,935
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2581
    Likes (Received)
    2799

    Default

    thanks guys.....

    I was more hoping for something like "all welders/fitters will provide their own.....

    chipping hammer,
    measuring tape
    tri square
    level
    12" adjustable wrench

    and so forth.

    Its just easier for new hires to have it all spelled out. I can probably come up with one, but its always good to hear what others are doing

  7. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    231
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    52
    Likes (Received)
    113

    Default

    Shipyard and heavy fabrication shop here.

    Company provides all PPE and equipment except the boots.

    Welder and fitters are issued green jackets/leathers/sleeves (depending on the job they do), hard hat, welding hood*, chip hammer, wire brush, soap stone, striker, gloves, safety glasses, ear plugs, tape measure and speed squares.

    *Welding hood is a standard hood. many guys bring in their own auto-darkening hood.

    When they wear something out, they can get a replacement but have to turn in the old one. Most of the consumables are in vending machines where you enter your employee # and a PIN and it dispenses your stuff - even welding jackets and gloves. If you go over a certain number per month, it will be payroll deducted. The numbers are pretty generous and few people exceed it.

    Before the vending machines we had guys getting new glove twice a week because they went home with them, or just lost them. This system has greatly reduced our consumable expenses and the guys have access to what they need even if the tool room attendant isn't there.

    Part of supplying all PPE can be a liability issue. We want to make sure they are using the proper equipment for the job, so we provide it. No excuse for them not to have it.

  8. Likes digger doug, Mcgyver, rcoope liked this post
  9. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    New York
    Posts
    760
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    280
    Likes (Received)
    251

    Default

    nah, sorry. if it is an employee, you gotta tool 'em up. enough to do the job.

    there was a time when employers would abuse the trade tool requirements for a job to the point that you got the job, but had to buy the tools, at the extortionist pricing, from the company store (with scrip, or credit against future pay at high interest), and then....

    could take months to pay that off, and having signed on, you were the company's slave, legally obliged, until that week's pay for the pickaxe, and the week and a half for the helmet and carbide light, etc. were paid off. look up the Colorado Mine Wars.

    many were recent immigrants who couldn't read what they were signing. my best friend's grandfather landed from Italy and went out to work. he survived.

  10. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    231
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    52
    Likes (Received)
    113

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by cyanidekid View Post
    by law, nothing.
    a smart company policy would specify type and extent of PPE for a given process and parameter,
    We have a chart posted - WITH PICTURES OF THE APPROPRIATE PPE - for each of the hot work processes. If you are grinding, you need a minimum of _____. same for welding, grinding, plasma tables, etc.

    Our safety department developed it. If you're a smaller company your insurance company may be able to give guidance with that.

    We also require that all clothing worn on the shop floor be natural fiber - no nylon windbreakers that will melt and stick to you. FR is not a requirement if not doing hot work.

  11. Likes Mcgyver liked this post
  12. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Washington
    Posts
    164
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    108
    Likes (Received)
    131

    Default

    Most shops I've worked at provided corded power tools,extension cords,grinding wheels,saw blades,fall protection ect
    But if I want a 4"grinder or a nice slider clamp that's on me
    Of course I have to have all my own personal hand tools,welding hood,leathers, precision measuring tools,ect
    IMHO the quality and quantity of tools a person has is a big indicator of there ability

    Beware the (journeyman) with no tools!

  13. Likes Mcgyver, Fabworks, gusmadison liked this post
  14. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Hampton, Virginia
    Posts
    2,448
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    183
    Likes (Received)
    171

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bloomautomatic View Post
    Shipyard and heavy fabrication shop here.
    .....Most of the consumables are in vending machines where you enter your employee # and a PIN and it dispenses your stuff - even welding jackets and gloves. If you go over a certain number per month, it will be payroll deducted. The numbers are pretty generous and few people exceed it.....
    I am very interested in the vending machine solution for consumables. Can you tell us more?

    Walter

  15. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    4,935
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2581
    Likes (Received)
    2799

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Hbjj View Post
    Most shops I've worked at provided corded power tools,extension cords,grinding wheels,saw blades,fall protection ect
    But if I want a 4"grinder or a nice slider clamp that's on me
    Of course I have to have all my own personal hand tools,welding hood,leathers, precision measuring tools,ect
    IMHO the quality and quantity of tools a person has is a big indicator of there ability

    Beware the (journeyman) with no tools!
    agreed, around here the norm is the welder fitter brings a limited kit of tools and we supply the rest. For PPE We supply work gloves safety glass and ear plugs, they supply the rest with safety boots mandatory. We don't wear hard hats in the shop, but when doing field work and installs most of the guys have their own, or we'll provide. Beanies and shields supplied by the welder.

    Doesn't look there is a any norm on it, so I'll post whatever list we come up with.

  16. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Peoria, IL
    Posts
    10,638
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    36
    Likes (Received)
    7912

    Default

    From my experience:

    1) 10lb sledge. No other hammers.

    2) Tape measure with the hook end broken off. Numbers worn of the first 12".

    3) Soap stone holders. No soap stone over 1/4" long.

    4) Torch strikers. No flints. Use matches.

    5) 4 Cartons of cigarettes, preferably unfiltered. Renew weekly.

    6) Leather gloves with the thumb and first finger either worn through or so stiff they make a permanent claw.

    Bonus items:

    5 lb pile of misc chuck keys that don't fit any drills in the shop. Lots of cut off disks with about 1/8" of abrasive left. Huge pile of chisels with the ends mushroomed out to at least 3X the shank diameter.

    Sharp drill bits are strictly forbidden.

    I'm sure I missed a few.

  17. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    1,088
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    187
    Likes (Received)
    256

    Default

    #7 Vise grips with broken or missing spring
    #8 grinding wheels so hard they won’t cut at all, boss said they are cheaper cause they last so long.

  18. Likes fusker liked this post
  19. #13
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Minnesota
    Posts
    546
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    319
    Likes (Received)
    165

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mcgyver View Post
    chipping hammer,
    measuring tape
    tri square
    level
    12" adjustable wrench
    If those are the sort of tools they need, why not provide them? Looks like < $100. If they lose or break them, buy them more. Otherwise they are going to mess around for 20 minutes doing the job with the wrong tool or the broken tool.

    That's the reality I see. For the majority of the moderately qualified sort of of people you can hire.

    -Jim

  20. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    4,935
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2581
    Likes (Received)
    2799

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by kb0thn View Post
    If those are the sort of tools they need, why not provide them? Looks like < $100. If they lose or break them, buy them more. Otherwise they are going to mess around for 20 minutes doing the job with the wrong tool or the broken tool.
    There is merit to that. It would be a longer list than that, that was just for instance. We do replace tools that break on the job. I guess the thinking is ownership instills a greater sense of responsibility for them, but I have open mind on it....was asking to get ideas and hear what others were doing.

    Getting control of the shop tools is another thing to tackle. The nature of fabrication, the shops tend to be larger than machining. We're 40,000 sf so someone walking around looking for tools can burn up time quickly

  21. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Washington
    Posts
    164
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    108
    Likes (Received)
    131

    Default

    I one of the more high end and organized shops I worked at tools basically went like this

    trigger puller ie a certified welder had enough of there own tools to change wire and gas and lay out skip welds

    Fitter/welder usually an older experienced fitter able to weld but not necessarily certified someone who can read blueprints and layout parts run a touch,punch,rotobroach ect usually they have a rollaway tool box

    Lead man all of the above plus specialist stuff like pipe,stair, H beam tools ect
    And would run the jobs

    Foreman one tool a axe to cut the jerks with no tools

    Or something like that

  22. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    WA, USA
    Posts
    1,494
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2001
    Likes (Received)
    1029

    Default

    Would a "Tool Allowance" (paid to employee based on job description/expectations) be a good idea in shops where employee is expected to supply the common kit? I'm talking about a documented company policy, not subject to arbitrary influences.

    The idea just popped into my head (no historical examples).

    I agree with the position that craftsmen prefer to work with their own tools (and take better care of them) but the employer is getting benefit. An allowance would help the user replace/expand the kit or extra $$ in pocket?

    Is an allowance "assumed" in the wage?

    Is an allowance more trouble than it's worth?

    Anybody get/give a tool allowance?

    No intent to derail Mcgyver's thread but it seems germane.
    Last edited by extropic; 01-04-2018 at 11:50 PM. Reason: sp

  23. #17
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Sacramento County, California
    Posts
    3,166
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1676
    Likes (Received)
    872

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ewlsey View Post
    From my experience:

    1) 10lb sledge. No other hammers.

    2) Tape measure with the hook end broken off. Numbers worn of the first 12".

    3) Soap stone holders. No soap stone over 1/4" long.

    4) Torch strikers. No flints. Use matches.

    5) 4 Cartons of cigarettes, preferably unfiltered. Renew weekly.

    6) Leather gloves with the thumb and first finger either worn through or so stiff they make a permanent claw.

    Bonus items:

    5 lb pile of misc chuck keys that don't fit any drills in the shop. Lots of cut off disks with about 1/8" of abrasive left. Huge pile of chisels with the ends mushroomed out to at least 3X the shank diameter.

    Sharp drill bits are strictly forbidden.

    I'm sure I missed a few.

    Cable Jack with worn frayed cable so that you can drop something on the concrete.


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •