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  1. #21
    Ox's Avatar
    Ox
    Ox is online now Diamond
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    Aug 2002
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    West Unity, Ohio
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    Personally - I got tired of the repairs and just took the back wheel assembly off. You have three points eh? (I know - it doesn't hold depth as good - but good enough for gov - ground.)

    Think Snow Eh!
    Ox

  2. #22
    Kurt Westfall is offline Stainless
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    Oct 2001
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    Montrose Iowa
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    You probley have all ready though of this, but did you incorprate a slip cluch or shear pin to protect aganst them nasty stumps, and things that like to bend shafts?

  3. #23
    svs
    svs is offline Hot Rolled
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    Apr 2004
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    Riverdale, Nebraska, USA
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    Roger,

    I'll surf a little and post a link if I find something like our woods mower uses. It's a dead simple design, I'll try to describe it better.

    The mower hitch is pinned to the deck. A 4'-5' long strut is pinned to the top of the mower hitch and on the other end to a 1' long link positioned vertically and pinned to the mower deck just behind the gearbox. Bump stops are strategically placed to limit how far the link can swing, and thereby how far the hitch can float. Clear as mud, right?

    Matt's idea for milling slots instead of drilling a pin hole for the top link pin would be easier. A 3"-4" long slot should give you all the float you need. Is it to late to modify your hitch this way?

    Scott

  4. #24
    sandman2234 is offline Titanium
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    Jan 2003
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    Jacksonville, Florida, USA
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    I built a 7'6" one, but it was more of a grooming mower, since it had 3 spindles, 3 blades. Sold it before I ever used it, but the new owner swore by it. He did bend one of the spindles, and it cost him $200 to get a new one. I made 3 spares, but didn't tell him about them.
    Another one I built, we took to the local galvanizing place and had the deck hot dipped galvanized. That has been 10 years and the original deck is still intact. Surprisingly enough, it wasn't that expensive.
    David from jax

  5. #25
    JST's Avatar
    JST
    JST is offline Diamond
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    Jun 2001
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    St Louis
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    The caster bearing is a goodie....slow rotation, generally not a full turn under load, and a very dirty abusive environment.

    Oil is no help, other than for preventing corrosion, since the slow movement won't build up a hydrodynamic film. Grease would be OK, if you could keep out dirt.

    Sure seems like a simple bearing that needs the least amoung of sticky stuff on it would be best. Failing that, bury the bearing under shields and seals.

    I would think that strips of cut bark, stalks etc would get wound around it and chew heck out of almost any seal that isn't protected. It sure happens on my tiller tine shafts. And they have a shield on them.

    The tail wheel gets dragged through the cut stuff, mud and water in ditches, and plain dusty dirt.

    If you could shield the seal from debris the hub bearing sounds pretty good. I don't think impacts would kill it, and they are pretty available. The surfaces that get wear (races) are replaceable.

    I don't know much about plastic bearings, but I have heard they tolerate grit. With a large enough diameter, and shields to keep grit out, that sounds promising too.

    The only problem I see is that the part that might get worn is the caster shaft, not as easily replaceable as bearing races.

  6. #26
    timekiller's Avatar
    timekiller is offline Stainless
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    Mar 2003
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    Huntsville, AL U.S.A.
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    Hello Richard,
    The flexable or slotted top link is to reduce the chance of getting the tractor hung with the front wheels and bush hog supporting the tractor. With the rear wheels off the ground. Some use a chain for the top link but if the front edge if the ground slides hang an object there is a chance the bush hog will pivot on the lower pins and threaten the operator, and drive line.

    Also, the flexable or slotted top link will reduce the chance of breaking the rock shaft (lifting shaft) housing. They are designed to lift equipment however some are not designed to support the tractors weight. I have seen several 4 wd Kabotas where the operators backed a bush hog up a bank, and had a rigid top link breaking the rock $haft housing. The 4 wd didn't let the operators know they were in a bind.

    Ray

  7. #27
    YoungDen is offline Cast Iron
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    Feb 2004
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    Kiron IA USA
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    What is your mower rotor going to look like? I saw an idea that I thought was worth considering. The idea used a car tire mounted on the back end of the PTO drive shaft. The bottom of the tire went thru an opening in the mower deck and drove the mower rotor by friction or traction which was about a 36" round plate. The thing looked like it would drive reasonably positively but slip with out damage in the event of contacting a stump, rock or the ground. Simple to build, just a couple pillow block bearings on the horizontal shaft and a couple heavy flange bearings on the verticle shaft. I am curious if anyone has ysed this idea.

  8. #28
    doc
    doc is offline Hot Rolled
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    Mar 2001
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    richard


    several years ago i acquire a bushog w/ a blind hole for the zerk fitting & shot bearing & shaft eaten down to 1/4 in.....i i turned up a full length piece of scrap brass/bronze, made a new shaft & opened the grease hole up .....i reckon every thing else will fail before the bearing does......cast iron is probably better ...the still original c/shaft (heavy) on my hand mill runs in 1 1/4 cast iron...it was built at least 80 yrs ago ,came out of production , & there is .006 clearance .....the spindle runs in near 3in. tapered bronze bush ,more than a foot long rescraped back to .0003 tir.


    best wishes
    docn8as

  9. #29
    doc
    doc is offline Hot Rolled
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    richard


    several years ago i acquire a bushog w/ a blind hole for the zerk fitting & shot bearing & shaft eaten down to 1/4 in.....i i turned up a full length piece of scrap brass/bronze, made a new shaft & opened the grease hole up .....i reckon every thing else will fail before the bearing does......cast iron is probably better ...the still original c/shaft (heavy) on my hand mill runs in 1 1/4 cast iron...it was built at least 80 yrs ago ,came out of production , & there is .006 clearance .....the spindle runs in near 3in. tapered bronze bush ,more than a foot long rescraped back to .0003 tir.


    best wishes
    docn8as

  10. #30
    Richard Rogers is offline Titanium
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    Nov 2001
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    Bentley, Louisiana
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    Den,

    Sidewinder was the brand I know for using an auto tire to drive the blades. I personally don't care for it because of the weight, but it's been told to me that it was a bulletproof way to do the job. Priefert from Texas used to make one that did that. I saw one of their 15 foot ones with three rotors, and one tire ran against the other to drive the outside mower blade rotors. I did like that.

    Thanks for all the input.

    Richard

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