Results 1 to 15 of 15
  1. #1
    Lilith is offline Plastic
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    MD USA
    Posts
    1

    Default Cheap milling machines?

    I saw a milling machine on Ebay for $80. What are the things I should look for in milling machines and what do you suppose would be the reason to charge only $80 on a milling machine. I think the brand was Edison or something. ><

  2. #2
    piniongear's Avatar
    piniongear is offline Stainless
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Houston Texas
    Posts
    1,509

    Default

    The reason that they are charging $80 for the machine is because most likely it is worth $60.
    There are no free rides in the world of buying milling machines or lathes. You will get what you pay for if you are lucky.
    For mills.......They should weigh at least 1800 lbs, and this is a case where more weight is better. A Bridgeport is really a bit of a light weight at 2400 lbs.
    Milling is a fairly brutal exercise and requires physical weight in the machine to dampen the vibrations produced by the operation. Otherwise, you get poor results and chattering and this will sour you quickly on milling..........pg

  3. #3
    gmatov is online now Diamond
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    SW PA
    Posts
    5,483

    Default

    lilith,

    Tell piniongear to stick it where the sun don't shine.

    Show a pic without telling where it is, to keep others from bidding on it.

    I don't know what a lilith is, but if you are a young lady who wishes to try the machining thing, go for it.

    Best if for 80 bucks it is small enough for a young lady to wrassle into her shop. Ain't no reason you can't be as good as the best here. Depends on you.

    If you can make something with an 80 buck, likely light machine, somebody puts you on a Bridgeport, you will probably knock their eyes out.

    If they change your mind, indoctrinate you to the point you HAVE to have a 2 ton machine, let me know the address. I will buy it for my son in law and his 11 year old son.

    Cheers,

    George

    Reread PG's post.

    OF COURSE, if you are going to hog metal, you want MUCHO iron.

    If you are a hobbyist, or want to learn, you do not need two tons of iron.

    Watchmakers make do with lathes that would be pushing it to attain 50 pounds. I would defy PG to match them in accuracy.

    He may say that is way different. Why is that? You are still turning steel, no?

    Why is a little SB9A such a sancrosant model of the BEST ever? Only a couple hundred pounds. Don't really make much sense.

    What you buy is what you THINK you need. If it is not the right thing, you sell it and buy what you NOW think you need, and tomorrow, you might need a little bigger machine.

    It is hard to ask such a question on a machining board. Everybody with junk will tell you what they wish they had bought, instead of a Chinee tool. No one admits that they HAVE any of them. Well, the guy that blew the aluminum pipe into his Ford fender did. Why the other guy was allowed to ask him how he liked the HF saw passed the censors, I don't know.

    It comes down to make do with what you have. If you have artistic skills, you would be able to make turned objects on the drill press, with files and abrasives.

    Professionals and wannabees here should not lean you in any direction.

    Cheers,

    George

  4. #4
    hardtail is offline Aluminum
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Camrose,AB
    Posts
    162

    Default

    Without pics or more details it's tough to say, could have been an old horizontal monster?

    My neighbour intercepted a couple Cinnci horizontals that were on their way to a scrap dumpster this past summer at a local steel mill, likely have done decades duty for them. Yes they have some "issues" but he's hoping to make one out of two, some peoples work and projects don't require amazing accuracy. That and on company takeovers or tax depriciation it's just easier to be gone with them.

    Good luck with your search a good knee mill probably is the most versatile and even if worn with backlash so long as it's predictable it can still function for years until the bug calls for something more.

  5. #5
    piniongear's Avatar
    piniongear is offline Stainless
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Houston Texas
    Posts
    1,509

    Default

    Wow George! I have not met you yet, but you sound like a really nice fellow. Let me help you get the knot out of your panties.

    Tell piniongear to stick it where the sun don't shine.
    I can only say I wish you could have simply said you disagree with me.

    If you can make something with an 80 buck, likely light machine, somebody puts you on a Bridgeport, you will probably knock their eyes out.
    You lost me there.......Huh?

    .Cheers,
    George
    Reread PG's post.


    OF COURSE, if you are going to hog metal, you want MUCHO iron.
    Well I assume hogging metal is what we do when we are in front of a metal working machine. At least that is my personal experience.

    If you are a hobbyist, or want to learn, you do not need two tons of iron.
    OK, hold it there George! I disagree with you. If a beginner starts with a piece of imported crap that weighs less than a bag of cement about all he/she will learn is this ain't gonna work. It is no fun and I give up will be the result. The money spent ($80 in this case) for the piece of garbage is money that has just been thrown in the trashcan. No wait, throwing it in the trashcan would be a lot more fun than trying to operate such a piece of crap.

    Watchmakers make do with lathes that would be pushing it to attain 50 pounds. I would defy PG to match them in accuracy.
    Well George, I do not do watch making myself, so I cannot comment on a watch making lathe. But I am sure that they are very accurate because I have not yet seen a badly made watch. So, we finally agree on something!

    He may say that is way different. Why is that? You are still turning steel, no?
    Turning down a stick pin takes a different piece of equipment than turning down a 1 1/2 inch diameter bar of 4130 steel.

    Why is a little SB9A such a sancrosant model of the BEST ever? Only a couple hundred pounds. Don't really make much sense.
    You have stumped me again George. Are you for a South Bend or against a South Bend? By the way, an SB9A with a cabinet is around 600 lbs with everything on it.

    What you buy is what you THINK you need. If it is not the right thing, you sell it and buy what you NOW think you need, and tomorrow, you might need a little bigger machine.
    Well George, most of us have all made that same mistake (Buying what you think you need) and then discovering our error.
    That trashcan is beginning to fill up isn't it?
    Perhaps I missed the point........I thought the poster was asking for opinion and advice. Guess I got side tracked, sorry.

    It is hard to ask such a question on a machining board. Everybody with junk will tell you what they wish they had bought, instead of a Chinee tool. No one admits that they HAVE any of them. Well, the guy that blew the aluminum pipe into his Ford fender did. Why the other guy was allowed to ask him how he liked the HF saw passed the censors, I don't know.
    I have nothing that was made in Japan, much less China or Taiwan in my shop, and it will always be that way because I buy what I like not what I have to make do with.
    What.....? I am confused again......Censors should control a person asking a question regarding how someone likes a tool that was in his photo? You lost me there George.

    It comes down to make do with what you have. If you have artistic skills, you would be able to make turned objects on the drill press, with files and abrasives.
    Like Jesus turned water into wine?

    Professionals and wannabees here should not lean you in any direction.

    Cheers,
    George[/quote]

    Whew, what relief! Since I am neither a professional nor a wannabe I guess you were not talking to me George.
    Glad we got that knot untied, and Happy New Year to you!.....pg

  6. #6
    Greg White is offline Titanium
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Pinckney Mi.
    Posts
    2,317

    Default

    well said gear.sombody was in a bad mood.hangover??????
    back to the cheap(very) mill,pictures would help,if you do not have the knowledge to decide get or find somebody that does to look at it.
    I spent 4500 for a B.port,I wanted to hit the floor running,I have over 30 years of machining practice.Mostly,I think I did ok on the purchase.
    Yep,get somebody with knowledge to look at it.
    Happy & Healthy New year to you all.
    GW

  7. #7
    Experimental is offline Aluminum
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Fayetteville,North Carolina
    Posts
    243

    Default Cheap Milling Machine

    piniongear is correct in his statement concerning a milling machine. You do need the mass to be able to mill or even drill something without having chatter. The heavier the better. One could mill on a small mill, with very lite cuts. I could also walk to New York from North Carolina but I prefer to drive or take a plane. Piniongear was just making a statement if one was going to buy a milling machine,which one would someone buy.

  8. #8
    surplusjohn is offline Diamond
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Syracuse, NY USA
    Posts
    9,092

    Default

    no law saying someone couldn't be selling a perfectly good machine for 80 bucks, if you don't know what it is you might think that is a lot of money for something you can't move.

  9. #9
    Waumbek is offline Hot Rolled
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Charlottesville, Virginia
    Posts
    563

    Default

    Hi Lilith,
    Welcome to the Practical Machinist's web board.
    Truth is, it's probably hard to say much about what kind of milling machine you might need without knowing a bit more about how you plan to use it. If you're working on small clocks and watches or small models, you'd probably be quite comfortable with something smaller. Some talented folks have built all kinds of things with the Sherline lathe and milling machine for example.
    On the other hand if your're into full size antique car engines, you're going to want something really heavy.
    I searched ebay for the Edison machine you mentioned and found it I think here: http://cgi.ebay.com/EDISON-10-X-44-V...QQcmdZViewItem
    This looks a lot like an Asian Bridgeport clone.
    If you're not familar with Bridgeports, surf over to here: http://www.lathes.co.uk/bridgeport/
    You'll get a short history of this very popular brand (still made incidentally) and begin to see why they're so popular. While you're at it, surf around the www.lathes website and look for other milling machines. Tony's machine tool archive is incredible.

    Some thoughts about this message board:

    1) For manufacturing and metalworking, it is the best, bar none. But it does have a professional/manufacturing slant so I have found it always best to do some homework before asking a question that is as specific as you can make it. It also helps to use the search function to see if anyone has ever asked the same question before.

    2) If you were to post a question like "what's better, asian machines or american/European ones?" it will tend to generate more heat than light. If you asked: "I need to make replica's of 1910 cast iron Franklin pistons for a living, what are my options?" and give us some pictures to stare at, we will like you.

    3) The best thing you can give us is a window into what you are trying to do. What are you trying to make?

    4) I only comment on completed auctions of any kind or my own auctions, in which case I'll post a note in the commerce section of this board.

    Cheers, Charles Morrill

  10. #10
    chipcatcher is offline Plastic
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    san diego
    Posts
    4

    Default

    Realistically, you don't need a 2400 lb mill if the biggest thing you're milling is a golf putter out of T6. Will it take you longer to mill than the heavy mill? Sure, but it will get the job done if you take your time and not try and hog out more than the machine is telling you is too much.

    Are they good learning tools? You bet. If you only had the attitude that it's gotta be ultimate stiffness/weight or don't even try then you'd probably never find out if you like this stuff to begin with. So on that basis I think piniongear is a bit off-base. Other than that, yeah he's right - bigger is better if you really need to mill something bigger and harder. If you don't need to do that then even those mini-mills can put out quite decent stuff too - again patience and technique being the key to get there. And a DRO on one will give you a turbo boost on the learning curve that will definitely make your experience much more 'enjoyable'. In fact I will go so far as to say whatever you do get a DRO - especially on the lighter less expensive mills.

    Bottomline: it all depends on what you plan to do with it. That 3,000 lb mill will chatter too btw and don't let anyone lead you to believe it's only the 100lb Micromark rig that will. They all chatter and it's all relative to how much and what material you're milling. Buy what you can afford. Then adjust to bigger/more expensive when you know it's your cup of tea later or if what you make helps pay for it.

    chipcatcher

  11. #11
    ToughTool's Avatar
    ToughTool is offline Hot Rolled
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Panama City, Florida 32401
    Posts
    544

    Default

    This post reminds me of a time before I bought my first lathe, some 28 years ago. I was building a boat lift and needed four pulley sheaves, for SS cable going to each corner of the boat. Yep, made them out of some 3" brass stock, sliced with a hand hacksaw and mounted on a 1/2 inch bolt and nut that I chucked in a Sears & Roebuck drill press. Cut the groove, using a round bastard file. Still have and use the drill press. I used those sheaves for 22 years, then gave them to my neighbor for his new boat lift. I changed the design of the lift for a bigger boat and didn't need them any more.:rolleyes: Does this mean I have artistic skills?

  12. #12
    macona's Avatar
    macona is offline Diamond
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Beaverton, OR
    Posts
    5,442

    Default

    To answer the question "why would they only charge $80?"

    Its Reliable Tool. Almost all their auctions start at 99 cents. Many things will not be bid up to anywhere near their full value till hours or minutes before the auction ends.

  13. #13
    gmatov is online now Diamond
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    SW PA
    Posts
    5,483

    Default

    PG,

    Sorry if you didn't like my response. It still remains, some people do not NEED what you and the majority, here, think is the best and the most.

    When one is looking at an 80 buck mill, I would normally think it is a Micro or Mini-mill, normally 4 to 500 bucks, new. If you have small stuff in mind to make, they will do the job, slower than the ton and a half BPorts and clones, but they will do it, if you can do it.

    If you can't do it, you could be given a 100 grand machine and still make scrap.

    The initial question was a bit premature, anyhow. It was an 80 buck current bid, from, I would assume, one of them 99 cent opening bids Reliable is known for. Final bid, if this is the one, was 2270 bucks, from the link Waumbek posted.

    Had she gotten this bid for 80 bucks, and it was scrap, she would have gotten a bargain, as scrap steel is about 270 per ton.

    Oh, BTW, I should have said "I disagree with you." Sorry to get YOUR panties in an uproar.

    I have nothing against SB lathes. Have 2 of my own, and a larger multi machine "out there" in the cold garage. Summer machines. Gets cold, I go to the basement and play with the Chinese mini mill and lathe. Low enough on the bench down there that I can sit down on a normal height chair to run them. Much easier on my back.

    Do I need anything bigger, I go out there and turn it in the cold assed garage, come winter. No fun, for me.

    No one knows what machine is proper for anyone till they know what that person wants to do with it. A hobbyist who is making miniature replicas does not need a 3000 pound BP.

    It is supposed to be a given that you can make small parts on a large machine. By the same token, you can not make large parts on a small machine. That is true.

    Once upon a time, I was reassigned from a 56 inch VTL, on which I could do mucho work, to a newly installed 64 inch, I think, may have been larger, memory fades.

    It was not easier to make small stuff on the larger machine. Small stuff means maybe 30 inch diameter.

    I could make them, but I could not make them and make my daily wage, which was a percentage over the time studied rate for the job, no matter what tricks I could use.

    Basically, you make small stuff, you should have a small machine, admittedly the BEST small machine you can afford, but a Chinese mill, or Taiwanese or a Sherline or Taig, for miniature machinists.

    I know the OP said 80 bucks, but that was just ridiculous. The bid was at that when she saw it, "Oh, Oh, should I buy this 80 buck mill?" She should have waited to see what range it ran to before she posted.

    Greg,

    Hangover at midnight? Getting a buzz on, OK. Nasty old man with a noon post, blame it on a hangover. Picture in the link, had I had a chance to bid another 5 and win, would have driven out to pick it up.

    Chipcatcher,

    You gotta be an old fart. You make sense. I like the little machines I bought. Take light cuts, takes a little longer, but, disabled-retired, I got lots of time. Actually, the longer it takes me to do something, the better I like it. Kills more of my evenings. No schedule to my work. Don't touch it for 3 days, no client yammering at me. Everything I do is for me and my grandkids. When it is ready, they get the product.

    They don't know what I am trying to make, so they don't yammer at me to hurry up.

    PG,

    "It comes down to make do with what you have. If you have artistic skills, you would be able to make turned objects on the drill press, with files and abrasives.

    Like Jesus turned water into wine?"

    Reference this thread in the SB Forum. Go to Post#117, from Paula. Files and abrasives and radius guages. She made hers in the SB but no reason it could not be done in a DP with the capacity.

    What have you made WITH your South Bend?

    Now, do you think you MUST be under CNC to do such a simple thing as to make a ball?
    This is not rocket science. You cut away all that stuff that does not look like the line drawing. Simple.

    Might not be simple to DO it, but, still, anything that should not be there should be cut away. Period.

    Whether you do it with a 100 pound Chinese mill or a 3000 pound BP, you take smaller cuts, you get APROXIMATELY, and I will not take sides as to which is the most accurate, the same result. Parts fit and parts work.

    Where's your beef? You sell heavy metal on the side, you get paid by the ton?

    You know, once upon a time, machining was a HELL of a lot more machinist intensive. Not what is called a "machinist" today. Computer input. Do it on the PC and parts fall out. Feed stock and collect them parts.

    If you do the handle Paula made in the link, would you have as much satisfaction in the result as she must have with her result?

    Of course Paula is not a producing shop, with competitors killing you. If you are NOT, then you could make this part on a drill press, IF you have the skill and the patience.

    If you don't have either the skill or the patience, just say so.

    Trying to talk to you is boring me. Reading your artsy-fartsy blue text pisses me off a little, too.

    I'd better get to bed before somebody else says I'm getting drunk, g'night, off to bed with cheese, onion, garlic, pepperoni, crackers.

    My Christmas began at midnight, I'm a Serb, so Merry Christmas to you all.

    Cheers,

    George

  14. #14
    J.Ramsey is offline Cast Iron
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    434

    Default

    I've only been a member of PM for about a year but one of the first things I always look for is replies by gmatov, George I really enjoy reading all of your replies.
    BTW whats a gmatov?

  15. #15
    gmatov is online now Diamond
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    SW PA
    Posts
    5,483

    Default

    J.,

    A gmatov is the name I signed on here with. You need a unique name to be listed.

    I am not ashamed of my name, which is under my profile.

    A Serbian of second generation, by name of George Matovich, born Matijevich, but the schools had me as Matovich. Actually had to get affidavits signed by my teachers, 45 years ago, before I was allowed to join the Marine Corp, that I was who I said I was. My birth certificate had me as Matijevich.

    Hey, I coulda been one of them McCarthy subservisives, no, or Anti subversives?

    I was after the McCarthy era, when military service came up.

    Innyhoo, I yam what I yam. Them who don't like it, well, I am old enough that I can tell them to pound salt or sand or whatever. Cake eaters, a term we use for some other people, can pound cake up the same place. We call it keksar, short for any English speaker.

    You got to understand, I could not speak English when I went to school about 58 years ago. I think I have a pretty good mastery of it in the in the ensuing years.

    I am really sorry that I have few contemporaries to speak Serbian with. My family spoke strictly Serb. My mother was born 2 years after my GM came from the old country. Spoke ONLY Serb. My Dad came about 1910, spoke only Serb.

    We spoke Serb at home, my contemporaries, kids my age, were brought up in homes that insisted the kids speak English. Serbian was the parents "secret language", things that the parents did not want the kids to know what they were saying. All the "kids" I know, them who are my age, know only the cuss words.

    Pitiful. I don't even have many people TO speak this language with.

    My granddaughter is in her third year of Spanish, in school. Who in the Hell in the business world speaks Spanish ? Chavez, maybe, Venezuela, but who else?

    SO, I might have given more info than manyy would like to know. I am not ashamed of any of it,.

    I am ME and them who do not like it, It goes down to BFD.
    Them who don't like me, I probably don't have much respect for you, either.
    Cheers,

    George

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •