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  1. #1
    gglines is offline Senior Member
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    Here's a picture:



    I received this as a gift. It's a retractable chuck key holder for a drill press. Brilliant mind that I have, I can figure out how to stick the magnet to the side of my Clausing. However, how does the rubber doohickey attach to the drill chuck key?

    George

  2. #2
    Ries's Avatar
    Ries is offline Diamond
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    Just like you put on a shirt- one arm through each hole. Several of my electric hand drills came with these things. But I have found these stamped plastic things get brittle and break after a year or two. Rubber ones, like on milwaukee drills, seem a lot better.
    Oops- looks like yours is rubber- Never mind.

    [This message has been edited by Ries (edited 08-14-2004).]

  3. #3
    Forrest Addy is offline Diamond
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    Cool. The drill press could get up to 500 RPM unspooling the cable before it snatches the magnet off and uses at as a flail to batter you shirt pocket high.

    I have a hole in my DP table by the column what I park my chuck key. When I can see it parked in the hole I know the key isn't in the chuck on the back side. Only then will I start the spindle motor.

  4. #4
    toolmakerjim is offline Titanium
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    i agree with forest. a lot of times you will find that some attachments arent worth the time to install them. only osha knotheads would use these things

  5. #5
    Mud's Avatar
    Mud
    Mud is offline Diamond
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    Ha Forrest - great visuals!

    My old Jr High shop teacher had a good idea I've never seen anywhere else. He bolted a cover over the start button which had a hole just large enough for the straight end of the chuck key handle to fit through to depress the start button. Then he attached the keys with a chain so you couldn't reach another drill press with that key. The stop button was left uncovered for obvious reasons. even with all those 7th graders I don't think anyone ever defeated that safeguard and started a drillpress with the key in the chuck.

    What I do is put a magnet on the left side of the head of the drill presses to hold the key right at the level of the switch - I can see whether or not it's there immediately, and it's right handy to grab it to use and put back - no fishing for a hole.

  6. #6
    gglines is offline Senior Member
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    Forrest:

    If I trade out my Clausing for a Harbor Freight Drill Press, wouldn't the magnet be strong enough to stall the motor after the retractable cord got wrapped around the spindle? Damn unsafe American iron!

    Ries, thanks for the tip, that makes sense. The rod for my chuck key is way too big for those holes. Plus, it has a large gripping flat on one end. I'll have to check the chuck keys on my electric hand drill.

    Thanks!

    George

  7. #7
    jim rozen is offline Diamond
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    Chuck key holder? What'll they think of
    next. My drill press already has one of
    those, it's called the chuck. I just stick
    the shank of the key in the chuck and snug
    it down.

    The portable drills all have the keys taped
    to the cords, so the working end of the
    key sticks out handy.

    I know milwaukee gives you the rubber widget
    with the drill, but I hate having to play
    'grab the key' when I'm in a hurry. I like
    those to always be in the same spot.

    Jim

  8. #8
    Forrest Addy is offline Diamond
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    I gave one opera set builder volunteer the basic drill press show and tell and safety lecture - including the key-in-the-chuck thing.

    I usually allow a reflective pause at that point so the cause and effect of "flying key is a bad thing" could dawn on the volunteer. There was indeed a lengthy reflective pause followed by an inspiration: "Why couldn't you tape the key to the chuck?"

    All this time. 44 years in the trade. Why didn't I think of that

    [This message has been edited by Forrest Addy (edited 08-15-2004).]

  9. #9
    ARFF79 is offline Hot Rolled
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    Slowly but steadily I am replacing all of my keyed chucks with those "Oh so expensive " Albrect keyless chucks. Now if they only came in that big size, you know the one, that seems to weigh 20 pounds, Super chuck that opens to 1" on the 4 morse in the lathe tailstock.
    I know that there will always be a place for keyed chucks, but for most of my drill press work or typical Bridgeport drill tooling changes, keyless are hard to beat.
    When I do use one, as my hands leave the drill chuck so does the key. If you never allow the habit of the key in the chuck while changing bits to start, you don't have to break it.

  10. #10
    Mike W is offline Stainless
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    On my drillpress I have one of those horseshoe shaped plastic pieces with a magnet in it. It is made to hold cables on a steel desk. It holds a chuck key just fine. I have another one on the side of my lathe tailstock.

  11. #11
    winchman is offline Stainless
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    Whatever happened to "self-ejecting" chuck keys? My circa-1982 Craftsman drill press came with one. It has a spring-loaded sleeve around the pin. If you let go of it, the spring is strong enough to eject the key onto the floor several feet away. There's a hole on the DP table to store the key in plain sight, too.

    Roger

  12. #12
    Doug is online now Diamond
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    Gosh, in all my years I don't ever recall leaving a drill press chuck key in the chuck when I hit the "ON" switch.

    On all my DP's I have a piece of 1/8 x 1" steel bent 90 degrees with a hole for the round part of the key. They're mounted right on the front of the head where you can't miss them. I've tried all sorts of cords, chains, etc to hang the keys, they always get tangled around your hand when using.


  13. #13
    Mack is offline Member
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    I guess I'm a one track minded guy. I never leave the key in the chuck but it has to be on a string hanging beside the DP. If it is not I forget where the damn thing is. I might even carry it to the other end of the shop when I get something else. lol. Not funny at all though when you are busy and can't find it. Make you say bad things! Mack

  14. #14
    jim rozen is offline Diamond
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    Not to mention all the bad things that
    get said all over again, when you find
    the key in your pocket when you take
    the pants off at night!

    Jim

  15. #15
    J Tiers Guest

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    Had a self-ejecting key once. Very shortly I was disabling the spring pin. They were made for chewing up the chuck teeth if you don't keep heavy pressure on the key.

    A real stupid pain, but oh-so-safe.

  16. #16
    Mack is offline Member
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    Oh yea I find drill bits, screws, nuts and bolts, washers and all sorts of other stuff when I change pants. Mack

  17. #17
    Cass Guest

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    I saw an OSHA compliant chuck key holder once that seemed to actually be a good idea. There was a phenolic plastic block screwed to the side of the drill press which had a microswitch in a hole made to fit the long handle of the chuck key. The microswitch was wired between the normal On/Off switch and the motor with the result that if the chuck key handle was not in the hole in the block pressing the microswitch shut the drill press motor would not run. I am sure some dope could put a piece of drill rod in the hole if he wanted to spin the key. I have never thrown a chuck key so I can't gauge how much fun it is. The key on our big DP is on the end of a piece of small chain so it hangs at the back of the machine out of the way when not in use. It is pretty obvious when the chain is running from the back of the machine to the drill chuck.

  18. #18
    AAA
    AAA is offline Aluminum
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    Cass,

    I've seen quite a few of those style chuck holders in machine shops here in Australia. It's funny cause every one I've seen had a piece of scrap metal dropped in there! ha ha.

    Mike

  19. #19
    toolmakerjim is offline Titanium
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    you could buy 20 surplus chuck keys and leave them laying close by

  20. #20
    Mack is offline Member
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    That would be way too much weight in my pants pocket by the end of the day.

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