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  1. #1
    SND
    SND is offline Diamond
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    My neighboor used to be a machinist, and he retired quite a few years ago. I'd say, maybe 20 ?. So far he has given me a couple tools that he has found in his basement.
    But tonight, he gave me a Moore & Wright (sheffield, England) 1/2 inch micrometer #933. It's quite small but still weighs more than I'd expect from its size. It came in a small box made out of sheet metal that is covered with a dark brown/black material that I have no clue what it actualy is. It's almost like a fabric that would have been dipped in some kind of rubber to make it more resistant.

    Anyway, this is the first time I hear of Moore and Wright, but I just found their web site, and they appear to be a good company.

    But this mic appears to be somewhat old, it has a little bit of rust on the anvils, not on the faces but on the sides. It mostly just looks like it hasnt been oiled in 20 years or more. I would like to give it a good clean, but I'm not quite sure how to take it all apart and I don't want to mess with it too much. There's dirt around the locking wheel, but I don't know how to take it out.

    Could I just dip it into something to get most of the dirt out like wd40?, and then just put some instrument oil on it? I won't bring it to work, it will stay at home and I don't plan on using it much. I'd just like to keep it in good shape.
    Also if any one has the same mic and knows around when they were made, I'd like to know.

    Thanx, take care!

  2. #2
    PeteM is online now Diamond
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    Moore & Wright is a good maker; the Starrett of England.

    Assuming this is a plain micrometer -- not mechanical digital -- the clean up should be easy. If it's mechanical digital you probably don't want to mess with it.

    Most any solvent can be used, that doesn't leave a residue or promote rusting. WD-40, however, will leave a bit of residue. An old toothbrush can be used to clean around the lock, threads, etc. Then use a light oil, perhaps 10 viscosity. Starrett makes a suitable and reasonably priced oil.

    The spindle will come out easily for cleaning. The locking mechanism has small parts that can easily be displaced the first time you take a mic apart -- so use a little care if you disassemble it and also in reassembling the spindle. You'll also find an adjustment to tighten the spindle if it's loose. Adjust that only if needed after a thorough cleaning and oiling.

    If you plan to store this, rather than use it, a light protectant like Boeshield is good because it doesn't gum up the works as much as LPS etc.

  3. #3
    aboard_epsilon's Avatar
    aboard_epsilon is offline Titanium
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    "It came in a small box made out of sheet metal that is covered with a dark brown/black material that I have no clue what it actualy is. It's almost like a fabric that would have been dipped in some kind of rubber to make it more resistant. "

    lol... Moore & Wright mics were sold in a modified glasses case (spectacles).
    all the best.......mark

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