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  1. #1
    boozer is offline Aluminum
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    160

    Post

    Just thought I would give this tip, Im constanty removing broken bolts/studs from equipement, and ive found the 9 out of ten times, if i cant get the broken stud out by drilling a pilot hole with a left hand drill bit, and going a couple sizes bigger, with another left hand drill bit, theres little to no chance an eazy out will back it out either.
    And If you break the easy out into the stud, them your really infor alot of work. Ill just keep stepping up the size of the left hand bit until it grabs the bolt and backs it out. if it wont come out due to Gualding, i stop at the size bit required to retap the hole, and just retap it, or take a dental pick and work what left of the treads out of the "nut"
    We have a 64 Pc set of left hand drill from 1/16 to 1/2" and they are worth their wieght in gold.
    I also belive the eazy outs, tend to expand the broken stud making it tighter yet to extract.
    Just a tip.

  2. #2
    Mike C. is offline Diamond
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Birmingham, AL
    Posts
    10,787

    Post

    I'll agree with this 100%. I have only managed to get an EZ out work on a couple of occasions. The best EZ outs I have used are the straight flute ones, too. You tap them in with a hammer and then back the broken screw out, the don't have the fast left hand thread and sharp taper of the other style and seem to be less likely to bind up.

    Left hand drill bits are the greatest invention since sliced bread, just make SURE to keep them out of sight of the typical shop monkeys. They'll chuck one up, flip the machine on and just LAY DOWN ON IT, wondering why it doesn't seem to cut. Ask me how I know.

  3. #3
    FarmallMan is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Troy, NY, USA
    Posts
    969

    Post

    A fella named Roger Welch named one chapter of "Busted Tractors and Rusty Knuckles" 'The EZ-Out Myth'. I had a good laugh when I read it, and I still smile thinking about it.

    Nick

  4. #4
    J. Randall is offline Stainless
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Vici Okla. U.S.A.
    Posts
    1,286

    Post

    I think most peoples problems with easy outs is knowing when or when not to use them. In my experiance if the bolt is broken by over torqeing or being sheared off, then an easy out will work to remove it. If it is already seized in the hole then forget it and use some other method. James

  5. #5
    CatHead's Avatar
    CatHead is offline Hot Rolled
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Amherst, Nova Scotia , Canada
    Posts
    617

    Post

    I think most peoples problems with easy outs is knowing when or when not to use them. In my experiance if the bolt is broken by over torqeing or being sheared off, then an easy out will work to remove it. If it is already seized in the hole then forget it and use some other method. James
    I agree...I live here in the land of rust, and worked as a mechanic for 10 yrs, so ive removed my share of rusted,broken and striped bolts/studs etc.
    Here easyouts and LH drills arent used much as everything is siezed...I do have a set and use them for bolts that have broken due to vibration or shear...if the LH drill doesnt bring it out i'll use the easyouts
    Otherwise its usually a nut MIGd to the bolt and lots of heat,penetrating fluid, etc. and helicoils when that fails...
    I use the square easyouts for removing sparkplug threads where the porcelin has blowout
    I also dont believe easyouts and heat go together....you'll just ruin your easyouts

  6. #6
    ruddsw is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    3

    Post

    the best way i have found to remove any broken stud/bolt is to sharpen a center drill left handed.

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