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  1. #1
    Access Db Guy is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Norfolk, VA
    Posts
    999

    Post

    Here in the Tidewater area are located several ship yards; new construction, repairs, etc. I often see ads seeking "Outside Machinists" but never actually knew what the difference was.

    Well, here it is:


    Machinist, Inside
    a. Simple and difficult drill press work
    b. Simple and difficult shaper work
    c. Simple and difficult lathe work
    d. Simple and difficult milling machine work
    e. Simple and difficult vertical and horizontal boring mill work
    f. Planer work
    g. Simple and difficult dismantling and erecting work
    h. Grinding work
    i. Simple and difficult turret lathe work
    j. Lay out work

    Machinist, Outside
    a. Disassemble or dismantle valves; inspect for wear/replacement; assemble
    b. Install stanchions and hand rails for gratings and ladders
    c. Dismantle pumps and minor auxiliary machinery; inspect; assemble
    d. Install piping for steam, exhaust, suction, discharge, heating, refrigerating, from plans
    e. Dismantle deck machinery; repair
    f. Dismantle main engines; inspect; repair
    g. Inspect turbines
    h. Remove propellor wheel, line, tail shafts; install
    i. Run horizontal and vertical lines for alignment of engine;
    j. Overhaul and repair refrigerating machinery
    k. Dismantle, overhaul, assemble generator governors

    Ref: Major Trades at the Brooklyn Navy Yard During the first half of the Twentieth Century

    Regards,
    Stan Db

  2. #2
    HuFlungDung is offline Diamond
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    6,606

    Post

    Up here, I think we call them 'outside machinists' by the term 'millright'.

  3. #3
    Navigator7 is offline Aluminum
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Tonasket, WA
    Posts
    160

    Post

    They call em outside machinists is Seattle but in Eastern Washington they are called mill wrights.

  4. #4
    eKretz is offline Titanium
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Northwest Indiana
    Posts
    2,898

    Post

    Yep, known as millwrights here too.

  5. #5
    Richard Rogers is offline Titanium
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    Bentley, Louisiana
    Posts
    3,349

    Post

    Wow, this makes me "amphibious!"

    [img]smile.gif[/img]

    Richard

  6. #6
    mtnman37879 is offline Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Tazewell, Tennessee
    Posts
    57

    Post

    I worked 20 years as an "Outside Machinist" At Tampa Shipyards in Tampa Florida. I did all the jobs on the list except b and d. All pipeing was done by the pipefitters and handrails were boilermakers jobs. Anywhere else I would be known as a "Millwright".

  7. #7
    Forrest Addy is online now Diamond
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    Bremerton WA USA
    Posts
    9,306

    Post

    Inside machinist are like bats; they sta warm and never see the light of day. Outside machinist are like cow $hit and melt in the rain, bake dry in the sun, or freeze in winter.

  8. #8
    RobBinIN is offline Aluminum
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Southern Indiana
    Posts
    186

    Post

    I worked as an Inside Machinist at Jeffboat in Jeffersonville,Indiana for a little while when I got out of the Navy. They build barges, tugs, and have built several riverboats. Outside machinists were part of our shop, but as everyone here has mentioned they are mill wrights.

  9. #9
    Michael Az is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Safford, Az., USA
    Posts
    1,311

    Post

    No shipyards here in the Az desert, but the London Bridge is here! I live close to a large copper mine and the machinists there have to go out and tear down what ever is broken and bring the parts into the shop for rebuilding. Maybe a bearing goes bad on a conveyor belt thats way up in the air.
    Michael

  10. #10
    plannerpower is offline Hot Rolled
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Newcastle, Australia
    Posts
    500

    Post

    When I started my apprenticeship here in Australia in 1960 it was as a "fitter & turner".

    During the course of such an apprenticeship, those who displayed an aptitude for "fitting" would be steered that way whilst those who displayed an aptitude for "turning" would be steered towards machining.

    In an Australian general engineering shop the bloke who did the duties listed for an "outside machinist" would be called a fitter. There is/was no single word for the bloke who did the "inside machinist" work; he might be called a lathe operator, a machine operator or a machinist.

    The terms "inside/outside machinist" were not, to my knowledge, used here.

  11. #11
    jmead is offline Hot Rolled
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Seattle,Wa
    Posts
    709

    Post

    I had an employee who always talked about his years "millwrighting in Canada" so I finally had to ask a marine engineer friend what that is. He thought for a minute and said, " well, its pretty much a machinist that can't run a lathe..."

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