Mori Seiki, LeBlond, American Pacemaker??? - Page 2
Close
Login to Your Account
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 32 of 32
  1. #21
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Midwest USA
    Posts
    270
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1
    Likes (Received)
    4

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ndh78 View Post
    How can you put the machines in order if you haven't ran all of them? Leblond parts are expensive, Mori parts are too but whacheon parts fit right in also. As far as lasting long I will put the Mori up against anything. In fact in all aspects I think the Mori is the best.
    Some models (MS) have the feed reverse on the head stock but some have it on the apron (MH I think). They are very, very rigid we can do things on a flat wore out Mori in our shop that nothing else we have will do. We face valves and form cut RTJ grooves on a Mori that has done nothing but just that for 15 years. If your not familiar think of it as turning an unbalanced casting, it does this every day. Sure the bearings growl and the compound finally got re scraped but it is still an extremely rigid machine. As far as accuracy I gunsmith with a MS850 and I've never ran a more accurate machine, I wouldn't trade it for anything and I have ran colchesters, leblonds, L&S, Summits, Monarchs, and other machines. I'm not taking anything away from the american machines but a lot of them are pretty dated while the Mori is much more modern.

    The bearings growl!? Yikes...

    The pacemakers have feed reverse on the apron... I thought all nice lathes would have it on the apron. Its a pain in the arse to do it on the headstock. (Well it wouldn't be a pain on my little stubby ones... but on a long one it would)

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Northwest Indiana
    Posts
    3,198
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    279
    Likes (Received)
    362

    Default

    The worst part of not having it on the apron is that you almost always have to stop the spindle to reverse the feed, unless you are running extremely slow. We have two 24" American lathes and I wouldn't trade 'em for anything. BTW, they both run over 1000rpm on the top end, IIRC something like 1800 RPM, so just because a machine is older doesn't mean it can't run with some serious speed. That kind of RPM on a 24" lathe is very uncommon even on today's manual machines.

    P.S. TMS8C8, did you get my email?

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Midwest USA
    Posts
    270
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1
    Likes (Received)
    4

    Default

    Hi eKretz!

    Yep, Pacemakers came in three speed ranges as well as three different gear configurations. They had a 9, 18 and 27 speed model and then you could also specifiy whether you wanted a high speed (max of something like 2000 rpm), a medium (max of 1800) or a slow (max of 1000). The low speeds where also higher for the higher speed models, obviously. I suspect that the different speed ranges were created by changing pulley diameters.

    I did get your email. It was in my junk box! Thanks for going through all that trouble. I'll write you more when I am closer to a decision. Thanks again!

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Houston, TX USA
    Posts
    26,795
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    "small" (14 and 16) Pacemakers came with 1000, 1500 or 2000 top ends.
    These have five driving belts

    "big" (18,20,22) Pacemakers came with 800, 1200 or 1600 top ends
    These have eight driving belts

    All this was confused later by dropping the 18 and 22 and making both a "medium duty" 20 based on the 16 and "heavy duty" 20 which was the old 20

    Any of which could be had with either 3 or 6" additional swing over the original and industry standard 2 1/2" more than catalog size.

    Hard outer vee ways came along about '50ish

    Scans of Bulletin 15, 16 and 20 are available compliments of Charlie (born2L8) scanning my bulletins.

    John Oder

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Huntington WV
    Posts
    368
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2
    Likes (Received)
    6

    Default Bulletin 17

    John
    I have scan's of bulliten 17, 6 pages. small enough to be emailed to anyone who might want it.

    archie =) =) =)

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Midwest USA
    Posts
    270
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1
    Likes (Received)
    4

    Default

    Thanks John! I think I read that somewhere, but I sure didn't remember.

    I talked to a rep from Bourn and Koch and he said that the hard ways did not become standard until 1955. Before that they were options.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Northwest Indiana
    Posts
    3,198
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    279
    Likes (Received)
    362

    Default

    Yep, we have one of each. One is older and has integral ways, and one is the newer style with removable hardened ways, 40HP, 27 speeds and I guess it must be 1600 top end, according to JohnO. We had a lot of trouble with the headstock gearing on the 40HP lathe. The guys at American parts dept. told us it was a pretty rare option and it gave the headstock fits when it was pushed near its limits. We replaced gears in the headstock on three separate occasions before sending out to an outside vendor for the gears instead of getting them from American and specifying case hardened 8620 for material. Haven't had a problem since.

    A typical roughing cut on the 40HP lathe is about .250-.400 DOC @ .030"-.045" feed per rev. depending on material and hardness. Still doesn't hit much over 100% on the load meter even when we're pushing it on the high end. I have only ever sustained about 95% load for any length of time.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    1
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Default Lodge & Shipley

    I have ran about every Major Brand of Lathe out there at some time or other and its hard to beat the POWERful lodge and Shipley Lathes. I own a 20 inch X model with a 20 hp mother of a motor. My dad bought the machine used in 1972 and had the ways reground in 1978. About the only thing i ever remember him replacing on the Old Lodge was the oil filter and that was 20 years ago. Its highest speed is only 500 RPM but it cuts good finishes with insert tooling on shafts as small a .750. Its been very hard for me to step down to a Taiwain Vectrax that the company I work for bought. Maybe someone smarter than me can tell me why i have to run the Vectrax at 1200 rpm to get the same finish the Lodge produces at 320 on the same steel with the same insert and same diameter work?? The Vectrax is a 1660 under powered cheap made junker. Sydney would be second on my list. I worked for a company that had a 1956 model. Alot of men had stood infront of her long before I did but the old girl still cut true. I remember looking the the old manual and the famous herringbone gearing. It was like looking back into a different world. I am 37 years old an consider myself lucky to have learned from the old school.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Utah
    Posts
    1,050
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    41
    Likes (Received)
    12

    Default

    Brand new '68 American Pacemaker 20x60

    New from government storage. $30,000

    http://www.machinetools.com/MT/machi...08178017156275

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Nevada
    Posts
    22
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    1

    Default Mori 850 or Okuma LS?

    Hi,

    I'm interested in what the opinion of the group is between these two lathes:
    Mori 850 vs Okuma LS. Say both well tooled and in good shape. If given the choice to purchase either one or the other. Precision counts and for gunsmithing too.

    Many thanks,
    Mac

  11. #31
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    tucson arizona usa
    Posts
    4,961
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2038
    Likes (Received)
    4513

    Default

    I work for a machenery dealer and we have both of those machines in stock they are both great I would pick the mori because of the parts being available easier. I have had both of them apart to fix and overhall stuff in them, they came out of the same shop and were run by a bunch of gorrilas but even they couldnt destroy them. I liked the okuma better because it had this really cool lever tailstock thing but the mori has a D16 spindle and the okuma has an A18 spindle the D is easier to change out than the A the fit and finish is equal but the okuma seems a little bit tougher the headstock is larger the gears are larger and the castings are heavier. For what you are doing you wont go wrong with either, so get the one that is in the best shape. one more thing A spindles are usually in good shape because it is a pain to take the chuck off so no one ever did.

  12. #32
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Nevada
    Posts
    22
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    1

    Default

    Hi KPotter,

    Thank you very much for the input. The Okuma LS is well tooled and it appears to be in decent shape. Some minor surface rust but it appears to come right off. Does anyone think this will really take away from it's accuracy? The Okuma was shipped without cosmoline on it. They used a thin film of WD-40 and rain had gotten under the tarp while it toured the US on a truck trailer doing other pickups and drop-offs. I'll give it a try. It's missing a few things- the lifting hooks, the two carriage stops and a carriage handle. But it has all it's manuals, tools, taper attachment, chucks, D1-6 spindle and more. I'm happy to have it. Many thanks and all the best.


Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •