Results 1 to 15 of 15

Thread: Oil Stone Care

  1. #1
    Whiskers is offline Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Somewhere in Illinois
    Posts
    61

    Post

    I think I have read here that it's possible to soak oil stones in kerosene to remove build up.

    Anything that one needs to be cautious about? Or does anybody have any better ideas?

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Greg Menke is offline Titanium
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Baltimore, MD, USA
    Posts
    3,419

    Post

    For my stone I a tupperware container just a bit larger, filled part way with honing oil, dropped in a couple washers and leave the stone face down on the washers, partially immersed. With the cover on, no dirt gets into the honing oil.

    When in use I lay the container's lid upside down on the workbench, stone on top of it. So all the drips go back into the container.

    Crud seems to eventually wash out of the stone and collect on the bottom.

    Greg

  3. #3
    Carl Darnell is offline Titanium
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Taylorsville Ky
    Posts
    3,122

    Post

    If you use oil on the stone then store it in a coffee can of kerosene when not in use. The oil will clog the stone. The stones that are used to sharpen straight razors and such are used with soap not oil. You can use the bar soap for shaving to lube the stone and wash with water when done. If you are set on using oil then wash or store the stones in kerosene.

  4. #4
    tkrotw is offline Aluminum
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    WY
    Posts
    118

    Post

    I soak them in kerosene overnight, then if still obviously clogged up. Wrapped the dirty oilstone in a kerosene soaked rag. Then baked it in an electric oven , fairly good results. Oven smells bad though.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    York, PA
    Posts
    81

    Post

    I like to use charcoal lighter fluid instead of kero for cleaning dirty/clogged stones. Throw stone in container, let it soak overnight or for a day or two. I use an old toothbrush to scrub gunk that comes to the surface and then rinse in a clean container of fluid. Repeat if needed. Let stone air dry or bake in sun (summertime) or toaster oven. Save old dirty fluid for starting charcoal in the summer or killing weeds - also handy for getting rid of underground bee/yellowjacket colonies.

  6. #6
    ulav8r is offline Cast Iron
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Russellville, AR 72802
    Posts
    364

    Post

    Use kerosene to clean the oil out of the stone, then use kerosene when using the stone instead of oil. Works just fine.

  7. #7
    Schliebe is offline Aluminum
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Scio, Oregon USA
    Posts
    210

    Post

    An old timer once showed me how to clean a stone... Put some solvent on a cast iron surface and stone the surface for a few strokes and it will clean a plugged up stone perfectly. I use the table on my old Powermatic band saw because it usually need cleaned up and it doesn't matter if I rub on it too much.

  8. #8
    wiz
    wiz is offline Cast Iron
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    blackstone. ma
    Posts
    324

    Post

    I like to use kerosene. I just leave the stones soaking in it. Seems to work for me.

    wiz

  9. #9
    traytopjohnny is offline Stainless
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    cincinnati
    Posts
    1,228

    Post

    I collect the dust from green wheels. I dip two stones in naptha and then touch the entire surface of one to the green dust and then rub the two together. I alternately flip them and then rinse both in naptha. Have know idea if this is good. Been doing it for years. My stones (India medium) do what I want them to do. John

  10. #10
    MitsTech is online now Stainless
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Newtown, PA USA
    Posts
    1,376

    Post

    Was shown this trick by a guy years ago, works great, at least for the standard 1x1x6" India stone...

    Take a peice of thick glass, we always used a mirror, and lay it on a bench. Smear some standard lapping compound on it, valve grinding compound works great. Thin it out with some *gasp* WD-40, mix it up, and lightly run the stone through the mixture in a circular motion.

    Presto, clean, flat stone in seconds. It really got the stone looking brand new. Rinse off with kerosene, mineral spirits, or similar to get the rest of the gunk off, or in our case being a mold shop, we used Slide brand mold degreaser

  11. #11
    Whiskers is offline Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Somewhere in Illinois
    Posts
    61

    Post

    Thank you all for your tips and advice. An old friend of mine always kept two stones of the same type around, he would dip them in water or coffee, and then sharpen what he needed to, and then would dip the one stone he used, then grab the other one and rub the two stones together and put them up.

    Thank you all again, at least now I now that soaking my stones in kerosene won't hurt them.

    P.S. This was for a 2" x1" x8" medium India Norton, a 2"x 5/8" x5" unknown, and a 1 5/8"x 5/8x 6" Arkansas. They have all lost their teeth, and need to be cleaned. Thank you again.

  12. #12
    Forrest Addy is online now Diamond
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    Bremerton WA USA
    Posts
    9,206

    Post

    If an oil stone is clogged its been used on something besides clean metal. If the stone is pinned - flecked with little hunks of metal - pick it out with a sharp scribe.

    If the stone is loaded with crap there's not much you can do about it outside of soak it for a few days in lacquer thinner, scrubbng it at intervals with wire or stiff vegetable fiber brushes. Kerosene, mineral spirits, and other straight petroluem solvents are useless for removing congealed crap from loaded stones.

    The simplest solution is to remove the worst of the clog and goo (WD-40, paint residues, wood dust and dirt, and automotive oils are famous stone cloggers) with lacquer thinner and a brush then dress the stone with a cheap but fresh coarse diamond stone from HF. Use plenty of dish soap and running water. The diamond wears off the stone with hardly any detrement to itself. The abrasive rolls off and down the drain. Once the stone is clean dry, it in the oven.

    Use the diamond stone for no other purpose. If you use it on steel you'll degrade the diamond in very little time so its practically ineffective on oil stones.

  13. #13
    jr45acp is offline Aluminum
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Brunswick, GA, USA
    Posts
    133

    Post

    An old gunsmith taught me to use an old fashioned gum eraser to clean india stones. Seems to work well, but gum erasers get harder and harder to find.

  14. #14
    OldWoodWorker's Avatar
    OldWoodWorker is offline Aluminum
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    California, USA
    Posts
    96

    Post

    The best way I've found to clean stones is an ultra sonic cleaner with some dish soap or simple green. They come out looking new. I've been doing it since I got my first US about 10 years ago.

  15. #15
    Metalmaster1766 is offline Plastic
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    cincinnati
    Posts
    26

    Post

    i always used kerosene and another stone, and other times i used a little grinding dust from a surface grinder, with another stone, i also knew a guy that had a cast iron block with several small holes ( .062" or smaller) drilled into it then it was surface ground to get it flat, then he used kerosene and rubbed the stone and block together, it seemed to work real good too

    Ron

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •