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  1. #1
    ray french is offline Titanium
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    Do any of you guys know if there is any value in old measuring instruments?Mics.calipers,dividers and such.I ran across an old leather bond instrument chest at a local flea market and it is full of Starrett measuring tools.Their are some mics in there that I didn't even know were produced in such small sizes.Actually look like perfect miniatures but they are the Real McCoy and they are all Starrett.

  2. #2
    JimK is offline Diamond
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    Hope you had sense to buy it.

    Monitary worth is one thing.

    You've got a tresaure there.

    If you like old achinery and tools your enjoyment is way beyoned what you could get for them on the market.

    I've got something like that and I've had it since my '20's.

    There are some things in this world that ya just can't put a price on.

    If you think they are neat tools now, wait till you use them for forty years.

  3. #3
    Jim Williams is offline Hot Rolled
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    Ray,
    The Midwest Tool Collectors have a meet in Madison every year down there near Atlanta off of Highway 20. There are a local chapters scattered around if you have interest. Anyway, Stanley is the big name with these fellows, but Starrett stuff excites them too. Keep the tools and enjoy using them as Jim says, but you would be surprised at what your duplicates will bring if you decide to move them. The Madison meet was just recently held. we have about four chapter meetings a year in the Charlotte area.
    Jim

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    Ray, are the small mics 1/2"??... I just love those little ones!!


    Peter

  5. #5
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    rivett608 is offline Diamond
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    Old and rare antique machinist tools can be worth a bunch...... I know of mics that have brough over a thousand bucks. just look at ebay at some prices for old stuff. To find out what it is, Ken Cope did 3 books on pre 1920 machinist measuring tools. I just happen to be a collector so post (or send it to me) a picture and I'll tell you if it is rare and worth more than it's user value.

  6. #6
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    rivett608 is offline Diamond
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    I think this proves the point.....

    http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...EBDW%3AIT&rd=1

  7. #7
    rivett608's Avatar
    rivett608 is offline Diamond
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  8. #8
    Winfield is offline Hot Rolled
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    I have this strange box shaped test indicator (can’t call it a TDI because there is no clock dial face) that I got from a garage sale about ten years back. I was reading “Accurate Tool Work” by Goodrich & Stanley 1908, and there was a whole chapter XVII devoted to using the test indicator with a picture of the same indicator H Kock & Son NYack N.Y Pat July.1906. The outside surfaces of the indicator has those polished circles all over. I don’t know what they are called, but the Ryan built copy of The Spirit of St Louis airplane down in SD Space museum has the same patterning on the nose.

    Don Clement
    Running Springs, California

  9. #9
    dennh is offline Stainless
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    Whadda you guys think a Starrett protractor head for a combination set might be worth from pre-1900? It has " #143 " stamped on one edge which looks as though it may have been a serial number. My recent vintage version of the head (type 1224, maybe 490, it's not in front of me at the moment) does not have any such number. It was in the family and may be from around 1890-ish.

    The 2 ebay items are eye-openers !
    Den

    [This message has been edited by dennh (edited 03-14-2004).]

  10. #10
    rivett608's Avatar
    rivett608 is offline Diamond
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    Winfirld.... what you may have is a shop made copy of a Koch indicator.... the factory made ones have the name and pat. date on the sliding lid.... I have seen a few shop made ones (this may have been a popular apprentice project) and the engine turning you reffer to is very popular on early 20th century shop made tools.... I think I have at least 10 different tools with that finish on them......

    Dennh.... the number on your protractor is most likely an assembly number.... propally is on the other part to.... these were made in large batchs and are quite common.... HOWEVER if the base is only 5 1/2" wide it is very rare...... they listed but never had a illustration of the 5 1/2" one in the catalogs of the late 1890's.

  11. #11
    Winfield is offline Hot Rolled
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    The Kock indicator is a facory original with the H. Koch, NYACK N.Y., PAT JULY 17 1908 engraved on the sliding cover. At the same time,along with the indicator, I got a 5" square made by Brown & Shapr MFG Co Poridence RI USA and also a 3" trammel made by B&S with internal adjustment lead screw that I have never seen any where. The square is quite accurate, better than 0.0001" in 5"
    These items probably came from an old Tool & Die maker. Also spindle of an old Starrett surface gage that has a square stop at the end that could be used for as a scratch gage. The spindle end cap of the Starrett 57B surface gage that I bought new some years ago has a round end cap to the spindle. I figured that Starrett used to make thier surface gages with the ability to work as a scrath gage in the past.

    Don Clement
    Running Springs, California

  12. #12
    ray french is offline Titanium
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    Well...thanks guys.I know this stuff has been sitting at this flea market for a month now because I've looked at it twice in that period of time.I just wasn't real sure about the small mics.I would guess that they go down to .25" with the largest being .75.Just didn't see the practicality of them.I was told by someone more local that the leather bound chest was probably worth 3 or 4 hundred.That seems to be a little far out to me.I mean it's in good overall shape although the leather appears to be awfully dry.I can pick it up for 150 to 200.What da ya think?That's the chest and the tools BTW.Porblem is I don't really have any interest in them other than their value.

    [This message has been edited by ray french (edited 03-15-2004).]

    [This message has been edited by ray french (edited 03-15-2004).]

  13. #13
    Evan is offline Titanium
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    I would buy it. This is my most valued measuring tool. It is a Jones Motrola Tachometer, three range to 12,000 rpm. Probably around WWI era, navy certified. It works perfectly, accurate to much better than 1%.


  14. #14
    dennh is offline Stainless
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    Evan: Motrola must have made those before they got into the cill phone business

    Rivett608: You're probably right about the assembly number. I looked around a bit after posting and these heads are not going for all that much. Maybe I'll just use and enjoy it
    Den

  15. #15
    rivett608's Avatar
    rivett608 is offline Diamond
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    Winfild the B & S trammel is most likely their # 843 Universal Divider.... they stopped putting that lead screw inside them about 1915.... if it is the one I think did you notice the mechanism that will not let you strip the threads if you try to adjust it while locked........ as to the value of the chest full of stuff... it is impossiable to say with out some pictures... lots of factors like what it is and condition...

  16. #16
    Winfield is offline Hot Rolled
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    There is no number on the B&S divider/trammel.It does have a mechanism for quick position change by pulling up with the thumb and a finger on the spring loaded plunger disconnecting the lead screw. I use this small divider/trammel all the time for layout work. It is the finest divider type I have ever used. Too bad nobody makes a divider/trammel as fine as this old B&S anymore.

    Don Clement
    Running Springs, California

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