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  1. #1
    Powerpooche's Avatar
    Powerpooche is offline Cast Iron
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    I'd like to fab a slip roll that would handle 24" X .100 Al or .030 SS. Anybody have any Ideas on what to use for rollers and a gearing setup.
    Pictures would be great.

    P.O.

  2. #2
    surplusjohn is offline Diamond
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    I saw a homebuilt using hydralic motors which are perfect for low speed high torque. It seems that the two lower rolls were geared together and the top had a seperate motor, but that was a few years ago.

  3. #3
    Mike Burdick is offline Cast Iron
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    P.O.,

    Here is a hand powered one I made. Maybe you can use some of the ideas.

    I used it to bend and roll 1/16-inch thick, 30-inch wide steel. I also rolled 1/8-inch thick, 12-inch wide steel. Could it roll thicker or wider? Maybe, but those dimensions were all I needed, hence the bottom roller distance.

    The rollers are 32 inches long and are made from a heavy wall 3.5-inch pipe (I think it’s called steam pipe – but not sure). The ends are 3-inch long solid bar inserts with a one-inch hole bored in the center for the 1-inch “axles”. These are machined for a very slight press fit and are held in place with a pin. I think you can see it in one the pictures. The bearings are just a simple bronze bushing. The top roller bushing is a piece of round bar stock also fitted with a bronze bushing, with two groves milled to slide against the side edges.

    The sides are 1/2-inch steel plate welded as shown. The axles ends have regular nuts (threads bored out) welded to them so I can turn them using a socket and a two-foot breaker with me as the power source. The top roller is made to come out if needed. For the fun of it, I machined each roller the entire length but that is not needed. All in all, very simple. This unit is made to bolt to a bench…a very stout bench!

    I welded nuts on all axles in case I needed more “power” (translated: more people) but didn’t need that on the material I bent. To roll the steel I used, I only needed to “power” the top roller as that supplied enough friction to pull the metal through.

    As you know, if one moves the bottom rollers farther apart the easier one can bend thicker material. So if you make those rollers adjustabe too, the more versatile your machine will be. Mine has sat in the storage shed for about 10 years now.

    You can probably come up with better ideas but at least this may provided you with some starting concepts…


  4. #4
    Powerpooche's Avatar
    Powerpooche is offline Cast Iron
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    Mike

    That's what I'm looking at doing.
    How did you drive the rollers?

    P.O.

  5. #5
    Mike Burdick is offline Cast Iron
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    P.O.,

    "How did you drive the rollers?"

    I used a socket and a 2-foot breaker bar on the top right roller axle! [img]smile.gif[/img] I only needed the roller for several items around the ranch and hand power was sufficient. That is why the nuts are welded to the axles.

    On your original post you asked about gearing setups. Perhaps you could get a speed reducer and use roller chain and sprockets. These items are fairly inexpensive and can be had at most farm supply stores. Or...go to farm equipment junk yards and get it "dirt" cheap! Be sure and gear it so it goes sloooooooooooooooow, very slow!

  6. #6
    snowman is offline Diamond
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    Mike,

    Are farm equip junk yards really that cheap for random parts? Hyd cylinders, chains, stuff like that?

    I've never really been to one, but always figured that since they are so specialized, they'd charge a bit more.

    -Jacob

  7. #7
    Mike Burdick is offline Cast Iron
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    Jacob,

    For things like roller chain and sprockets: no one really buys anything used as the cost of a breakdown is so high why risk it. I wouldn't use it on my equipment either. So...these things are usually tossed in a dumpster for the recycler to haul away.

    As for hydraulic cylinders? Farmers are usually very thrifty and repair their own. So I don't know about those.

    For old tractor parts...that's a different story!

  8. #8
    snowman is offline Diamond
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    i would just like to find a source of some really cheap hyd cylinders...i dont mind rebuilding them, done it before. i watch ebay occasionally, but for the cost of shipping for something that heavy, it's hardly worth it. they usually go cheap at onsite auction...but we haven't had many lately that perked my interest.

    i really miss working on the farm. we had our own little junkyard that would allow me a free supply of crap. hex shafts, random cylinders, steel, etc.

    -Jacob

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