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  1. #1
    dwilliams1128 is offline Member
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    Jul 2004
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    Like I said I don't know how to cut threads yet, and maybe someone is in the process of sending me a copy of the manual for my lathe (9X20 lathe from WholeSale Tools Inc.) looks green. I can tell that somethings could have been made better, like on the tailstock there is a nut to clamp the stock down tight. But on some better lathes, there is a lever that you pull on to to clamp. And then about the tool post, it may be neat to have a quick change tool post, but I personally like the old fashoned ones with the half circle wedge that allows you to change the angle of attack of the tool you're using.
    Well actually I have made threads before in a college class and made a nut to fit on it and it turned out pretty well (no pun intended) it's just that that lathe was bigger that this one and I forgot most of that by now. This site is helpful:

    http://www.machinist.org/army_machinetool/ch7.htm

    Over all I'm in the market for a used lathe that has been maintained well and has high tollerances, maybe around 2 to 4 horse power and dimensions a 12X40 engine lathe. These lathes tend to weigh around 1000 pounds and does anyone here know how to lift and move such a weight and get it into the lower floor of our basement?
    Thank you.
    David Williams
    dwilliams1128@earthlink.net
    Bye

  2. #2
    jkilroy is offline Diamond
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    Jul 2004
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    Vicksburg, MS
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    I is *always* time to think about getting a better lathe.

  3. #3
    Michael Moore is offline Titanium
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    Jun 2004
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    San Francisco, CA
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    I just did that - now the time is to think about lathe tooling! And a better mill. And mill tooling!

    David, great photographers can take great photos with an old Brownie or a disposable Instamatic. Great machinists can take a crappy old machine and make great parts.

    The rest of us want a machine (or camera, or whatever) that will be friendly and helpful, and let us look good in spite of our lack of skills.

    That little lathe could probably be your friend, but by the time you fix it up to be friendly your money and time will probably be better spent on a lathe that starts off friendly.

    My guess is those rocker toolposts have probably made more wannabe machinists give up in disgust than anything else. An Aloris style QCTP on my 10x24 (which though not sounding much bigger than yours was quite a bit heavier machine - more like the 12x36 bench lathes) made it something that was waaaaaay less of a PITA to use.

    Also, parting off with the rocker post pretty much ensures a lot of overhang and flexibility. I found that if it catches really hard the cross slide would snap (with a very loud bang) in half right down the lead screw channel. Parting off is a lot less exciting with a good solid tool post, and being able to part things off is a nice thing to be able to do with your lathe (if nothing else it reduces the scarring from slamming your knuckles into the chuck jaws when hacksawing something off).

    ANY lathe is going to be better than no lathe. I know guys that have chucked things up in an electric drill and scraped away at them because they didn't have a lathe. But if you think you are going to want to stick it out and do machining try and get something that 1) fits into your budget with money left over for tooling and 2) doesn't make you dread using it because your skill level doesn't allow you to compensate for the machine's shortcomings.

    cheers,
    Michael
    (hobby machinist-wannabe)

  4. #4
    Lee3 Guest

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    You can use that 9x20, but you should tune it up. You need to make a 4 bolt tool post to stiffen it up. Go to this yahoo group to get info.
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/9x20Lathe
    I have a 7x14 lathe and I am making additions and tweaking it. Part of the fun. Just made a carriage lock and now making the tailstock cam lock.
    You can download the manual at harborfreight,com 9x20 lathes are the same.
    Make some chips.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    suburbs of Ann Arbor, MI, USA
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    12,486

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    Over all I'm in the market for a used lathe that has been maintained well and has high tolerances, maybe around 2 to 4 horse power and dimensions a 12X40 engine lathe. These lathes tend to weigh around 1000 pounds and does anyone here know how to lift and move such a weight and get it into the lower floor of our basement?
    David

    I can put out my usual suggestion of a Clausing 5914.

    -12x36 capacity
    -hardened bedway (minimizes the possibility of gross wear)
    -5C capable spindle (1-3/8)
    -2hp
    -1200# conservatively
    -quick clamp tailstock
    -true powerfeed (that doesn't use the precision leadscrew surfaces as a powerfeed)
    -spindle clutch (allows motor to run)

    The hydraulic variable speed drive is a little bit of a weak spot in the machine. Some have used VFDs others have used DC drives others have just rebuilt what is there.

    Solving the second part of the question as to how to rig and move any lathe of that weight is probably more important than actually finding and buying the machine. Unless you can afford to hire riggers, it is completely up to you to preserve your personal safety and the precision condition of the machine. Moving downstairs is one of the most difficult moves IMHO and I don't want to discourage you here but it's not something to be taken lightly.

    Taking the lathe apart into large pieces, the bedway being the largest is an option that reduces the sheer bulk and top-heavy nature of the complete machine. You have to be very careful to get everything back correctly upon reassembly, especially the alignment of headstock and bed.

    Good luck on this, bounce as many questions here on the board as you need to be comfortable before proceeding.

    -Matt

  6. #6
    Rafael is offline Junior Member
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    Jul 2004
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    Virginia Beach, Va. ,USA
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    I gave him a link to it, but one of his posts showed he was waiting for it.
    I sent him the Grizzly manual via E-mail.

    He has started 4 threads on this lathe, and replied to NONE. Strange.

    Cheers

    $
    RAF

  7. #7
    dennh is offline Stainless
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    Sep 2002
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    Probably a busy guy or maybe he doesn't have a "reply" button on his page

  8. #8
    dennh is offline Stainless
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    deleted duplicate - gotta quit hitting that refresh button at the wrong time !

    [This message has been edited by dennh (edited 07-31-2004).]

  9. #9
    Rafael is offline Junior Member
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    Virginia Beach, Va. ,USA
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    Yeah Dennh, must be.

    $
    RAF

  10. #10
    dsergison is offline Diamond
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    East Peoria, IL, USA
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    what the heck?

    you need to learn how to run that 9x20 untill you can thread, make press fits, taper, etc... use it for a whole year.

    and when you have a stack of projects that you can't possibly work around because it's too small then think about bigger.

    you'll be surprised what you can do with that 9x20. and while youre at it, fix all the things you find crappy about it. when youre done you'll have learned what to look for when you go shopping for the next.


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