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Thread: TOS lathe?

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by justsayno View Post
    If I am not mistaken , Modern has recently aquired the new import rights for TOS..

    ,,

    If your electric motor is reveresed? how was the oil pump pumping oil to the uppers?


    AS far as adjusting.. I"T s a feel thing.. you have to run it to see if' it's slipping ie, cut heavy.. then re adjust.. primitive. but it works... Also make sure you use the right oil...

    I discoversd an arrow on the pulley on the clutch shaft that I overlooked the first time. Based on that arrow, I have the correct rotation, and yes, carrige lever down does, indeed engage foward.

    Also, the service tech at Modern told me that 32 weight hydraulic oil was perfect for all lube on that machine, including the ways. His theory about the lighter, less tacky oil for the ways was the tacky oil will hold abrasive contaiminets in the ways and grind them down( which I do know for a fact that abrasives in the air from grinding/deburrring or just a lot of dirty dust will cause lots of problems on machines).He said just oil the ways more often with the 32, both to help flush the dirt and to counter the lack of tack agents in hydraulic oil. Now I'd be interested to head what kind of response THAT elects from some people. I would say for a general shop environment he's propably right. If you have a clean machine shop with no fab/grinding/cutting operations going on way oil would be good.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by peterve View Post
    Set your carriage at the far right Then adjust the clutch by tightening the split nut so tight you can just engage the clutch with the lever on the carriage. You have to feel a click doing so Then set the spindle for max rpm Run the motor Engage the clutch The spindel has to get to full speed in a certain time Don`t remember exactly but I expect about 4 sec Perhaps exact time is stated in the manual
    And if you have to drain the oil to set the clutch you have to much oil in the gearbox The oillevel is below the lower side of the hole behind the cover
    Peter
    The manual states that the oil level should be half-way into the sight glass on the lower rear cover and that the oil level" must reach high enough for gears of the clutch shaft to be dipped in oil and, by splashing, to form an oil mist which serves to lubricate all elements of the gearbox." (page 45 of my manual)

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    Quote Originally Posted by DJFAB View Post
    The manual states that the oil level should be half-way into the sight glass on the lower rear cover and that the oil level" must reach high enough for gears of the clutch shaft to be dipped in oil and, by splashing, to form an oil mist which serves to lubricate all elements of the gearbox." (page 45 of my manual)
    That is correct That way the oil is just below the lower side of the opening
    Or am I missing something???
    I have adusted the clutch several times on a SN40 SN45 SN50 SN71
    Never had to drain the oil
    Does the manual say to drain the oil ???

    Peter

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    Quote Originally Posted by peterve View Post
    That is correct That way the oil is just below the lower side of the opening
    Or am I missing something???
    I have adusted the clutch several times on a SN40 SN45 SN50 SN71
    Never had to drain the oil
    Does the manual say to drain the oil ???

    Peter
    Well, on mine, the sight glass is IN the lower rear cover, app 1" from the bottom edge of the cover-so the oil level is above the lower edge of the cover. Unless I have greately mis-understood something somewhere, this all seems correct. You obviously have much more experience with these than I, so this appearant difference puzzles me. Perhaps later I can post a pic of mine and you can tell me if it is different.

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    Here's the back covers. You can see the sight glass. The long tube sticking out below is the drain.

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    DJFAB

    You are completly right
    I must have mistaken with another lathe
    Perhaps PBR I have had several of them to
    But adjusting like I explained is right
    Peter

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    Hi guys!!

    I'm from Portugal, and I just bought a tos sn 50b.

    So before i start working with it, I would like to do a little maintenance like changing oils.
    But I have two problems and I hope you can help me.
    1- I do not know what kind of oils I should buy.
    2- I do not know where the drainage points and the filling points are.

    Sorry for my bad English, and sorry to post here but I'm new here and I do not know where i should post.

    Best regards
    Daniel Oliveira

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    Quote Originally Posted by dani_gt View Post
    Hi guys!!

    I'm from Portugal, and I just bought a tos sn 50b.

    So before i start working with it, I would like to do a little maintenance like changing oils.
    But I have two problems and I hope you can help me.
    1- I do not know what kind of oils I should buy.
    2- I do not know where the drainage points and the filling points are.

    Sorry for my bad English, and sorry to post here but I'm new here and I do not know where i should post.

    Best regards
    Daniel Oliveira
    That's an old post and I don't have any experience with a TOS lathe but someone here likely will step up and help you out.
    Your english seems to be as good as mine, welcome to the forum.
    Dan

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    Quote Originally Posted by Danny VanVoorn View Post
    That's an old post and I don't have any experience with a TOS lathe but someone here likely will step up and help you out.
    Your english seems to be as good as mine, welcome to the forum.
    Dan
    Thanks for the answer.
    I think I found the drain point, but I need to know the oil I should use.
    I hope someone can help me.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dani_gt View Post
    Thanks for the answer.
    I think I found the drain point, but I need to know the oil I should use.
    I hope someone can help me.
    40 weight engine oil should do just fine. 220 way oil for the apron. It was recommended to warm up the lathe for 15-30 minutes at the beginning of a shift. Memory fails me but I believe that lathe had a cover for the ways ahead of the apron, similar to some Grazzianos. I wouldn't run it without one.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DJFAB View Post
    Also, the service tech at Modern told me that 32 weight hydraulic oil was perfect for all lube on that machine, including the ways. His theory about the lighter, less tacky oil for the ways was the tacky oil will hold abrasive contaiminets in the ways and grind them down( which I do know for a fact that abrasives in the air from grinding/deburrring or just a lot of dirty dust will cause lots of problems on machines).He said just oil the ways more often with the 32, both to help flush the dirt and to counter the lack of tack agents in hydraulic oil. Now I'd be interested to head what kind of response THAT elects from some people. I would say for a general shop environment he's propably right. If you have a clean machine shop with no fab/grinding/cutting operations going on way oil would be good.
    In makes sense "in theory" but in practice, it's a very bad idea. Problem is lathes, mills etc have vibrations. Thin oils do not like vibrations at all. Without question, the thicker the oil the better the shock/vibration protection.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dani_gt View Post
    Hi guys!!

    I'm from Portugal, and I just bought a tos sn 50b.

    So before i start working with it, I would like to do a little maintenance like changing oils.
    But I have two problems and I hope you can help me.
    1- I do not know what kind of oils I should buy.
    2- I do not know where the drainage points and the filling points are.

    Sorry for my bad English, and sorry to post here but I'm new here and I do not know where i should post.

    Best regards
    Daniel Oliveira
    These are sweet lathes. ISO 68 WAY oil for the ways, and ISO 68 GEAR OIL for the headstock. I've ran and maintained many TOS lathes- the ISO 68 is even specified in the manual on the newer ones (as of mid 90's). No way cover on the carriage on this machine from the factory, and I've yet to see a TOS with one.

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    Quote Originally Posted by RC Mech View Post
    These are sweet lathes. ISO 68 WAY oil for the ways, and ISO 68 GEAR OIL for the headstock. I've ran and maintained many TOS lathes- the ISO 68 is even specified in the manual on the newer ones (as of mid 90's). No way cover on the carriage on this machine from the factory, and I've yet to see a TOS with one.
    ISO 68 is as far as I know way too thin for a less than new headstock/bearings on that lathe. By the time it reaches 100C which can easily happen during hard cutting or drilling ( in the bearing region ) it's viscosity would've dropped to under 8cst though given the rubbishy quality of 68 oils, that might end up around 4 or so. That will toast the bearings particularly at low speed.
    Thank you for the way cover comment - I double checked and you are right. They never had one. That was on Grazianos.

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    Thanks guys for all the help.
    I was able to get the manual of the lathe and it recommend iso 68, so that is the oil I use.
    After a few hours working with the lathe, I noticed that the temperature is quite high, and when I chek the oil gauge I see that the level increases.
    This is normal?
    It could be because the oil is to thin?

    Thank you all
    Beast regards
    Daniel

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    Sounds pretty much normal.

    Headstock should be warm to touch after extended use. Typically oils are expected to work at around 70 to 90°C even though they are specified at 40°C. Viscosity will drop off considerably when the oil warms up but the designers will have taken that into account. Actual running viscosity isn't that different for a reasonable range of specified viscosity. The major issue is thickening when cold as the viscosity can become so great that the oil doesn't flow properly before damage is done. High viscosity index oils, synthetic or part synthetic change rather less with temperature and can be worth the extra cost. The short report is readable :- http://www2.eng.cam.ac.uk/~mpfs/pape...2005-64229.pdf and shows the effect for Iso 46, 68 and high VI oils.

    Are you sure you have the right type of ISO 68 oil? Most major brands carry several types that might loosely be termed machine oil with rather different characteristics.

    Clive

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    Quote Originally Posted by dani_gt View Post
    Thanks guys for all the help.
    I was able to get the manual of the lathe and it recommend iso 68, so that is the oil I use.
    After a few hours working with the lathe, I noticed that the temperature is quite high, and when I chek the oil gauge I see that the level increases.
    This is normal?
    It could be because the oil is to thin?

    Thank you all
    Beast regards
    Daniel
    Couple more details would help. How hot it got ? Can you measure ? What sort of work was done, which speed ? Basically, they shouldn't get ( near the front bearing ) so hot you can't touch it but they can get so hot you won't want to touch it for long.

    Machine tool manufacturers recommend oils based on what's most probable for the majority of clients to have at hand. ISO 68 is MOST probable. Manuf. do NOT recommend or test for some "optimal" oil. That would be expensive and chances are the client will not have it and not replace it. In general, provided a film is formed and maintained, the thicker the oil the better the protection.


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